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An Irish woman reveals that her colleague googled how she pronounced her name just before a conference call

Irish woman is left hysterical after seeing her British colleague Googling ‘how to speak Fionnula’ when they shared their screen during a video call

  • The UK-based Irish woman named Fionnuala sent Twitter with an accident
  • Revealed that her colleague was googling how to pronounce her name before the conference
  • The colleague shared his screen without realizing that he had left his tab open
  • Others with an Irish name said that people never knew how to pronounce their name

An Irish woman left Twitter by revealing that her UK-based colleague had looked up how to pronounce her name before a conference.

The woman, named Fionnuala, based in London, shared a screenshot of her colleague’s screen on the social platform, pointing to a search tab at the top of the page.

The unnamed colleague had looked up how to pronounce her name, but unfortunately forgot their search before sharing their screen with the rest of the team during a video conference.

Other Fionnualas (pronounced ‘Fin-oo-la’) and people with Irish and Gaelic names sympathized, sharing how people often struggle to pronounce their name and come up with bizarre variations.

An Irish woman named Fionnuala, based in London, sent Twitter down by revealing that her UK-based colleague had looked up how to pronounce her name before a conference

An Irish woman named Fionnuala, based in London, sent Twitter down by revealing that her UK-based colleague had looked up how to pronounce her name before a conference

She explained that the colleague had looked up her name, but forgot to close the search tab before sharing his screen with the team during a video conference call

She explained that the colleague had looked up her name, but forgot to close the search tab before sharing his screen with the team during a video conference call

She explained that the colleague had looked up her name, but forgot to close the search tab before sharing his screen with the team during a video conference call

The tweet quickly went viral, with Fionnuala collecting over 21,200 likes and nearly 800 in two days.

“When your colleague shares his screen and they still have this tab open,” she wrote, after sharing a snapshot of her colleague’s screen and drawing an arrow to the search.

She added the hashtag #irishnameproblems to the tweet.

Commeters asked Fionnuala if she would be offended if her colleague didn’t know how to pronounce her name correctly.

Fionnuala, pictured - pronounced 'Fi-noo-la' said she didn't mind telling people how to pronounce her name directly because she was very proud of it

Fionnuala, pictured - pronounced 'Fi-noo-la' said she didn't mind telling people how to pronounce her name directly because she was very proud of it

Fionnuala, pictured – pronounced ‘Fi-noo-la’ said she didn’t mind telling people how to pronounce her name directly because she was very proud of it

“No, not at all,” she replied. “I usually let them guess at first how close they are, but it’s such a great conversation starter.

“I’m so proud of my name that I love to tell people how to say it.

Other Fionnualas agreed to say that people had struggled to pronounce their names several times.

Other Fionnualas and people with Irish and Gaelic names said they had a healthy problem with many people mispronouncing their names

Other Fionnualas and people with Irish and Gaelic names said they had a healthy problem with many people mispronouncing their names

Other Fionnualas and people with Irish and Gaelic names said they had a healthy problem with many people mispronouncing their names

“I’ve often been called vanilla,” said one of them.

“Aww I would be glad they bothered, instead of just calling me Fiona-wala,” said a Fionnuala McCully

“When I graduated, they spoke the Fi-on-wala. My brother said afterwards that he didn’t think it was possible to rhyme my name with koala … but they did, “another quipped.

Other carriers of Irish and Gaelic names shared their own experiences.

A woman named Niamh (pronounced Neev) said that people had no idea what to make of her name.

Many said that the colleague had meant well by looking up her name, and preferred that people try their best to look up rather than slaughter their names

Many said that the colleague had meant well by looking up her name, and preferred that people try their best to look up rather than slaughter their names

Many said that the colleague had meant well by looking up her name, and preferred that people try their best to look up rather than slaughter their names

“I’ve had phone calls with customers who spent the first five minutes asking to speak to nee-am and when I say” yes that’s me “they say” no no-am please, “she said.

The name Fionnuala comes from Irish mythology and means ‘white shoulder’.

According to Irish legends, Fionnuala was one of the four children of Lir, a sea god, turned into swans for 900 years by their jealous stepmother Aoife (pronounced EE-fa).

People noted that the colleague meant well by looking up the pronunciation of the name.

“Nice that they try to get it right the first time,” wrote a woman named Brede. They may think they offended you. I have this problem with my name, but people just change my name to Bred-a without even asking and keep calling me that even when corrected, ”said someone.

“Aww it’s great that they wanted to try to do it right,” said another.

“Oh that’s nice that they bothered to find out! I wish more people would do the same with my name. Guesses are never, never right, “said one.

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