Home Australia An Australian woman’s beach swim turns into her worst nightmare as she issues an urgent warning to anyone entering the water this summer.

An Australian woman’s beach swim turns into her worst nightmare as she issues an urgent warning to anyone entering the water this summer.

by Elijah
0 comment
Celeste Stirrup, 52, went swimming at Bulcock Beach on the Sunshine Coast with her granddaughter last month with a scratch on her leg from a mosquito bite.

<!–

<!–

<!– <!–

<!–

<!–

<!–

An Australian grandmother almost lost her leg after a morning swim when a bacterial infection from the beach entered her body through a mosquito bite.

Celeste Stirrup, 52, went swimming at Bulcock Beach on the Sunshine Coast with her granddaughter last month.

A few days after swimming, she noticed a 20cm lump on her thigh that became incredibly painful.

“I had a fever and started to feel sick, so I grabbed a cold washing machine, turned on the air conditioning and went to bed early.” he told the Courier Mail.

Celeste Stirrup, 52, went swimming at Bulcock Beach on the Sunshine Coast with her granddaughter last month with a scratch on her leg from a mosquito bite.

Celeste Stirrup, 52, went swimming at Bulcock Beach on the Sunshine Coast with her granddaughter last month with a scratch on her leg from a mosquito bite.

A few days after swimming, she noticed a 20cm lump on her thigh that became incredibly painful.

A few days after swimming, she noticed a 20cm lump on her thigh that became incredibly painful.

A few days after swimming, she noticed a 20cm lump on her thigh that became incredibly painful.

Stirrup woke up around 2 a.m. and couldn’t shake his fever.

‚ÄúThat’s when the blisters started. It almost felt like a volcano was erupting under my leg,” she said.

The first large blister burst, causing a large gash on her leg, and she rushed to Sunshine Coast University Hospital to have it bandaged.

Stirrup was all alone when the surgeon sent her for a CT scan and told her they would “take her for immediate amputation” if they found a particular type of bacteria.

Stirrup warned Australians not to swim with open wounds

Stirrup warned Australians not to swim with open wounds

Stirrup warned Australians not to swim with open wounds

Fortunately, the bacteria causing the infection was identified as cellulitis and soon after, medical staff assured him that amputation was not necessary.

She remained in the hospital until February 6 and ten days later she underwent surgery to remove the dead tissue. In a few weeks, she will undergo skin graft surgery.

A nurse told him it was the fourth case they had seen on the Sunshine Coast in the last two weeks.

Stirrup hasn’t been able to work for five weeks and said it felt like living in a “crazy nightmare.”

‘This shouldn’t happen to anyone. If you have a bite or a cut, you shouldn’t go swimming.’

You may also like