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An Australian girl can lose fingers to freeze while struggling to survive in the Syrian refugee camp

The Australian girl, three, can lose her fingers to freeze while struggling to survive freezing the Syrian refugee camp for ISIS brides and their children – as they plead to go home

  • Amirah, three, is the daughter of the Melbourne woman who traveled to Syria in 2014
  • The girl’s father, Nabil Kadmiry, was stripped of Australian citizenship in October
  • Amirah’s fingers have turned black while fighting the harsh winter conditions
  • Just like her five-month-old brother Yayha, she too is supposed to be malnourished

Three-year-old Australian girl Amirah may lose her fingers to freeze in a Syrian refugee camp for the family of ISIS hunters, doctors have warned

Three-year-old Australian girl Amirah may lose her fingers to freeze in a Syrian refugee camp for the family of ISIS hunters, doctors have warned

A three-year-old Australian girl can lose her fingers to freeze while fighting through an ice-cold winter in a refugee camp for the families of ISIS hunters.

The child, Amirah, is the daughter of Kirsty Rosse-Emile – a Melbourne woman who traveled to Syria with her husband Nabil Kadmiry in 2014.

Kadmiry, an ex-ISIS hunter, was stripped of his Australian citizenship in October after being imprisoned by Kurdish forces – while his family is being held in the al-Hawl camp in northeastern Syria.

Amirah’s fingers on her left hand have turned black as she fights the harsh winter conditions, with doctors fearing that they might have to be amputated.

She has pain in her kneecaps and, like her brother Yahya, who is only five months old, is believed to be malnourished. The Guardian reported.

With falling temperatures, cases of rickets, developmental disorders and a lack of portable clothing in the camp have also been reported.

The tents in which the stranded families are staying are allegedly soaked under the heavy snowfall that has fallen on the camp.

No fewer than 70,000 women and children are being held in the Syrian camp, including 66 Australians – although none of the Australians have been charged with involvement of a family member in ISIS.

The young child named Amirah is the daughter of Kirsty Rosse-Emile (photo) - a woman from Melbourne who traveled to Syria in 2014 with her husband Nabil Kadmiry, an ex-ISIS hunter

The young child named Amirah is the daughter of Kirsty Rosse-Emile (photo) - a woman from Melbourne who traveled to Syria in 2014 with her husband Nabil Kadmiry, an ex-ISIS hunter

The young child named Amirah is the daughter of Kirsty Rosse-Emile (photo) – a woman from Melbourne who traveled to Syria in 2014 with her husband Nabil Kadmiry, an ex-ISIS hunter

With the falling temperatures, cases of rickets, developmental disorders and a shortage of wearable clothing have also been reported in the Al-Hawl camp (photo)

With the falling temperatures, cases of rickets, developmental disorders and a shortage of wearable clothing have also been reported in the Al-Hawl camp (photo)

With falling temperatures, cases of rickets, developmental disorders and a shortage of wearable clothing in the Al-Hawl camp have also been reported (photo)

A woman is depicted with a child in the al-Hawl camp in northeastern Syria in March 2019

A woman is depicted with a child in the al-Hawl camp in northeastern Syria in March 2019

A woman is depicted with a child in the al-Hawl camp in northeastern Syria in March 2019

One row of tents in the camp has been given the name ‘Australia Street’, whose residents yearn for Vegemite and plead with Home Secretary Peter Dutton to take them home.

Last year it appeared that the women had left their homes in Sydney and Melbourne to travel to the Middle East and marry ISIS hunters – but then they were stranded and desperate to return.

Save the Children Director of International Programs and Policy Mat Tinkler said there is “no practical barrier” to the repatriation of families in al-Hawl.

Save the Children director of international programs and policies Mat Tinkler said there is “no practical barrier” to the repatriation of the families in al-Hawl (photo)

“It’s really drastic, there is a moment, it comes down to -3C in that part of Syria,” he said.

“We have seen a little girl who is likely to lose her fingers due to freezing, we see grenade wounds, we see mental health problems

“It is our real concern that an Australian child will die in that camp.”

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