An alarming number of children have seen their parents drive dangerously

Most teenagers have seen their parents driving illegally, according to a survey conducted by a road safety charity.

Eighty percent of teenagers have seen their parents driving illegally, according to a survey conducted by a charity road safety organization.

The Blue Datto Foundation asked the Year 11 students at a school in West Sydney if they had seen their parents break the law while behind the wheel.

Under the protection of anonymity, students were encouraged to draw the misdemeanors they had witnessed.

Most teenagers have seen their parents driving illegally, according to a survey conducted by a road safety charity.

Most teenagers have seen their parents driving illegally, according to a survey conducted by a road safety charity.

One revealed that his parents drive drunk, while another said that his mother was driving with her knees

One revealed that her parents drive drunk, while another said that her mother was driving with her knees.

In another drawing, a boy begged his father to stop talking on the phone while driving.

The Blue Datto Foundation was created in 2014 by Colleen Vassallo after her 17-year-old son Philip was killed when his car collided with a speedy unit in the western suburbs of Sydney.

The survey was conducted by the charity road safety The Blue Datto, created in 2014 in memory of Philip Vassallo by his mother Colleen after he died in a traffic accident.

The survey was conducted by the charity road safety The Blue Datto, created in 2014 in memory of Philip Vassallo by his mother Colleen after he died in a traffic accident.

The survey was conducted by the charity road safety The Blue Datto, created in 2014 in memory of Philip Vassallo by his mother Colleen after he died in a traffic accident.

Colleen Vassallo said parents underestimate the role they play in the lives of their children, adding that she was trying to change the opinions of those who say "my father does drink, but he is a good driver."

Colleen Vassallo said parents underestimate the role they play in the lives of their children, adding that she was trying to change the opinions of those who say "my father does drink, but he is a good driver."

Colleen Vassallo said parents underestimate the role they play in the lives of their children, adding that she was trying to change the opinions of those who say "my father does drink, but he is a good driver."

Both drivers were provisional license holders red.

Ms. Vassallo said: "Parents underestimate the role they play, they (children) look at everything we do and some students have said" my dad does drink, but he is a good driver ", so we make them question that" .

In a separate survey, organized by Road Safety Education on behalf of The Daily Telegraph, a student revealed that his father drove home early in the morning while he drank all night & # 39;

Brooke O & # 39; Donnell, Director General of Education for CSR, said: "It tells us that our children are watching everything.

"Every wrong move a parent makes undermines the positive messages they are trying to teach when the time comes to lead lessons."

A study by the University of New South Wales also showed in a study of 20,882 drivers between the ages of 17 and 24 that young, newly licensed drivers were 30 percent more likely to crash if their parents had recent traffic offenses .

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