Americans sleep worse every year, research finds

Americans find it HARDER to sleep every year: Five million adults throw and spin more and have trouble staying asleep – and our smartphone use may be to blame, the study says

  • Researchers looked at data from 165,000 Americans between 2013 and 2017
  • At that time, the number of adults who had problems falling asleep increased by 1.43%
  • Adults who said they had trouble staying asleep rose 2.7%
  • The team says they look at smartphones before they go to bed
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Americans have a harder time falling asleep and staying asleep every year, a new study shows.

Researchers discovered that no fewer than five million American adults struggle to sleep peacefully all night.

Surprisingly, falling and falling asleep problems were most common among those who slept seven to nine hours the most nights.

The team, from Iowa State University, assumes – based on previous research showing that teenagers have trouble falling asleep looking at their phones before going to bed – that the behavior may be passed on to adults.

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A new study from Iowa State University has shown that the proportion of adults who reported falling asleep at least one day a week increased by 1.43% between 2013 and 2017 (file image)

A new study from Iowa State University has shown that the proportion of adults who reported falling asleep at least one day a week increased by 1.43% between 2013 and 2017 (file image)

The National Sleep Foundation recommends that adults get between seven and nine hours of sleep every night.

However, a 2015 study of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention discovered that about 50 percent of American adults sleep less than the recommended hours.

Inadequate sleep has been shown to increase the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and even cancer.

For the new study, published in the Sleep Health journal, the team looked at data from around 165,000 people from the National Health Interview Survey.

Between 2013 and 2017, the number of adults who reported falling asleep at least one day a week increased by 1.43 percent.

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And the number of adults who said they had trouble staying asleep at least one day a week increased by 2.7 percent.

The percentages may not seem significant, but the researchers say this means that as many as five million Americans are struggling to get a good night's sleep.

& # 39; Indeed, how long we sleep is important, but how well we sleep and how we feel about our sleep is important in itself, & # 39; said Dr. Zlatan Krizan, a professor of psychology at Iowa State University.

& # 39; Sleep health is a multidimensional phenomenon, so investigating all aspects of sleep is crucial for future research. & # 39;

The team could not say definitively what caused the quality of sleep to deteriorate, but they suggest that technology may be to blame.

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& # 39; We know from our previous research that there is a connection between smartphone use and insufficient sleep in teenagers & # 39 ;, said lead author Garrett Hisler, a former student at Iowa State and now a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Pittsburgh.

& # 39; If we sit on our phone before bedtime or receive notifications in the middle of the night, it may be more difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep all night. & # 39;

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