American armored warship was destroyed by the sea mine of a German U-boat

3D images (photo & # 39; s) collected by an autonomous underwater vehicle allowed researchers to find the location of the explosion and to determine the cause of the destruction of the ship. Six people lost their lives when the ship perished, but the rest of the 1,177 strong crew survived the ordeal

For centuries mystery about how an American armored warship was destroyed by a German U-boat is SOLVED when experts find a sea mine who has sunk the ship and killed six men

  • USS San Diego sunk on July 18, 1918 when it was attacked by a German U-boat
  • Six of the 1117 crew members on board were killed by the attack while it was sunk in 28 minutes
  • 3D images have revealed the cause of the ship's demise as a sea mine
  • The 500-meter-long armored ship remains intact and upside-down off the New York coast, even after a century under 110 feet of water

Joe Pinkstone for Mailonline

The sea mine of a German U-boat was responsible for the sinking of the USS San Diego that died in the First World War.

The ship was long suspected of being destroyed by the German submarine and new evidence has now supported this theory.

Six people lost their lives when the ship perished, but the rest of the 1,177 strong crew survived the ordeal.

The 500-meter long armored ship was destroyed in just 28 minutes and remains intact under 110 feet of water off the coast of Fife Island, New York.

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3D images (photo & # 39; s) collected by an autonomous underwater vehicle allowed researchers to find the location of the explosion and to determine the cause of the destruction of the ship. Six people lost their lives when the ship perished, but the rest of the 1,177 strong crew survived the ordeal

3D images (photo & # 39; s) collected by an autonomous underwater vehicle allowed researchers to find the location of the explosion and to determine the cause of the destruction of the ship. Six people lost their lives when the ship perished, but the rest of the 1,177 strong crew survived the ordeal

Dr. Alexis Catsambis, a maritime archaeologist from the Archaeological Institute of America, presented his findings at a research stop in Washington.

The German submarine U-156 has long been suspected as the responsible party, but the method of destruction has been a mystery for more than a century.

3D images collected by an autonomous underwater vehicle allowed researchers to find the location of the explosion to determine the cause.

Analysis revealed that the gaping hole was too large to be caused by an internal explosion – such as deliberate sabotage or an explosion in coal powder.

It is also claimed that the diaphragm of the explosion is not large enough to have been a torpedo strike and that the counting bubbles that follow the projectile were not seen by 17 registered eyewitnesses.

The researchers concluded that the most likely explanation was a T1 or a T2 torpedo tube mine.

Simulations re-established how the mine affected life on the ship and discovered that it took only two minutes for the impact area to come under water.

Ten minutes after the explosion, the ship saw its side and water flowed over the gun deck.

The USS San Diego (photo) was used as an escort for military and supply ships and was intended to protect them during the first part of their trip to Europe. It was hit by a mine of the German U-boat U-156 and sank off the coast of New York in just 28 minutes

The USS San Diego (photo) was used as an escort for military and supply ships and was intended to protect them during the first part of their trip to Europe. It was hit by a mine of the German U-boat U-156 and sank off the coast of New York in just 28 minutes

The USS San Diego (photo) was used as an escort for military and supply ships and was intended to protect them during the first part of their trip to Europe. It was hit by a mine of the German U-boat U-156 and sank off the coast of New York in just 28 minutes

The ship was used as an escort for military and supply ships and was intended to protect them during the first part of their trip to Europe.

Het The format of the 3D modeling data makes analysis easy to compare, "says Ken Nahshon, PhD, of the Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division in a statement.

& # 39; Before we started this, I was not familiar with the ability to do this under water; above water we always do it, but collecting 3D data under water is a challenge.

"I have learned that the vast amount of expertise needed to interpret it is an asset to technological progress in charting the seabed."

It is assumed that the armored shell of the ship behaves like a "belt" & # 39; and the decaying carcass of the ship.

WHAT WAS THE USS SAN DIEGO?

The USS San Diego was a 500 foot long armored vessel that was built in 1904.

It was originally called the USS California (ACR-6) and renamed the San Diego in 1914 for the First World War.

It sank on 18 July 1918 when it was attacked off the coast of New York by a German U-boat.

A mine hit the hull of the ship and it was only fully submerged 28 minutes later.

It is now largely intact, but upside down under 110 feet of water.

Six people lost their lives when the ship perished, but the rest of the 1,177 strong crew survived the ordeal.

The USS San Diego was a 500 foot long armored vessel that was built in 1904. Originally it was called the USS California (photo)

The USS San Diego was a 500 foot long armored vessel that was built in 1904. Originally it was called the USS California (photo)

The USS San Diego was a 500 foot long armored vessel that was built in 1904. Originally it was called the USS California (photo)

& # 39; The legacy of the incident is that six men were killed on July 18, 1918 & # 39 ;, said Catsambis in a statement from Fox News.

With this project we had the chance to set the story straight and thus honor their memory and also validate that the men on board did everything right in the run-up to the attack and in the reaction.

"The fact that we lost six men over 1100 is proof of how well they responded to the attack."

U-156 is believed to be the responsible party as the records place it near the USS San Diego at that time.

On July 22, 1918, a few days after the demise of USS San Diego, it was the only attack on the American mainland of the war when it attacked a number of Massachusetts-based tugboats.

The submarine struck a U-minefield in the North Atlantic and sank before the war ended and has never been found.

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