Amelia Earhart crashed on the desert island of the Pacific

Amelia Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan tried to circumnavigate the globe by plane when they disappeared on July 2, 1937. Their remains were never positively identified, but a research group is convinced that they crashed on a remote Pacific island.

More than 80 years after the famous pilot disappeared with his navigator somewhere in the Pacific Ocean, a comprehensive study revealed the details of the last days of Amelia Earhart.

In the week after the disappearance of his plane on July 2, 1937, there were 120 reports from around the world that claimed to have picked up radio signals and distress calls from Earhart, of which 57 were deemed credible.

An effort led by Richard Gillespie, executive director of The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery, analyzed these final transmissions, painting a disturbing picture of their increasingly desperate situation over the course of seven days.

Defying one of the widely accepted theories, which states that his Lockheed Electra crashed and sank in the ocean, calls for help suggest that Earhart and a seriously wounded Fred Noonan were stranded on a reef, at the mercy of the tides.

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Amelia Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan tried to circumnavigate the globe by plane when they disappeared on July 2, 1937. Their remains were never positively identified, but a research group is convinced that they crashed on a remote Pacific island.

Amelia Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan tried to circumnavigate the globe by plane when they disappeared on July 2, 1937. Their remains were never positively identified, but a research group is convinced that they crashed on a remote Pacific island.

The researchers analyzed 120 reported distress signals from Earhart after he disappeared, and found that 57 are credible. They say that all the signs point to Gardner Island as a source, because the clarity of the received messages increases the closer the listeners are to the island.

The researchers analyzed 120 reported distress signals from Earhart after he disappeared, and found that 57 are credible. They say that all the signs point to Gardner Island as a source, because the clarity of the received messages increases the closer the listeners are to the island.

The researchers analyzed 120 reported distress signals from Earhart after he disappeared, and found that 57 are credible. They say that all the signs point to Gardner Island as a source, because the clarity of the received messages increases the closer the listeners are to the island.

Seven people who received credible distress calls managed to take directional bearings, and five of those bearings cross in the vicinity of Gardner Island, the study showed.

Seven people who received credible distress calls managed to take directional bearings, and five of those bearings cross in the vicinity of Gardner Island, the study showed.

Seven people who received credible distress calls managed to take directional bearings, and five of those bearings cross in the vicinity of Gardner Island, the study showed.

The new full study of the Earhart Project of TIGHAR collects every distress call received in the week after the pilot's disappearance, revealing a chronology of each hour of the events that occurred.

These harrowing messages were picked up all over the world by naval stations that actively participate in the search, and casual listeners in their homes.

On Friday, July 2, hours after his disappearance was known, a station that was leading the search heard a voice that is believed to be heard. And, when they were asked to confirm with a series of scripts, three stations heard the answer and one understood the word & # 39; Earhart & # 39 ;.

Later that night in the second "active period" of signaling, a housewife in Amarillo, Texas, heard Earhart say he was "down on an unknown, small, uninhabited island."

The broadcast went on to say that the plane was "part on land, part in water" and that navigator Fred Noonan was seriously injured and needed immediate medical attention.

That same night, a woman from Ashland, Kentucky, heard Earhart say that the plane was in the ocean & # 39; and on or near a small island & # 39;

Researchers are working on the theory that Earhart managed to land his Lockheed Electra on a reef that surrounds the islands, where he stayed for at least a week (mockup image)

Researchers are working on the theory that Earhart managed to land his Lockheed Electra on a reef that surrounds the islands, where he stayed for at least a week (mockup image)

Researchers are working on the theory that Earhart managed to land his Lockheed Electra on a reef that surrounds the islands, where he stayed for at least a week (mockup image)

The timing of the distress signals, which arrived at night, coincides with the low tide patterns on the reef. Researchers say this is the only time that Earhart could have been able to run the plane's engine without the propeller hitting the water, to power its radio

The timing of the distress signals, which arrived at night, coincides with the low tide patterns on the reef. Researchers say this is the only time that Earhart could have been able to run the plane's engine without the propeller hitting the water, to power its radio

The timing of the distress signals, which arrived at night, coincides with the low tide patterns on the reef. Researchers say this is the only time that Earhart could have been able to run the plane's engine without the propeller hitting the water, to power its radio

The tide patterns also show an unusually high tide on July 7, the day of the last credible transmission, which probably would have flooded the Electra and ruined the radio. It could even have been enough to sweep the plane in the surf, where it would have been broken (in the photo)

The tide patterns also show an unusually high tide on July 7, the day of the last credible transmission, which probably would have flooded the Electra and ruined the radio. It could even have been enough to sweep the plane in the surf, where it would have been broken (in the photo)

The tide patterns also show an unusually high tide on July 7, the day of the last credible transmission, which probably would have flooded the Electra and ruined the radio. It could even have been enough to sweep the plane in the surf, where it would have been broken (in the photo)

She continued: "Our plane is about to run out, water everywhere, very dark," before continuing to mention a storm and winds.

"You'll have to leave here," he said. "We can not stay here long."

Almost all the signals considered credible can be traced back to Gardner Island, where Earhart and Noonan were probably left on a reef.

But, Gillespie explains in the new document, the transmission from this place presents a dilemma.

"The radios depended on the batteries of the aircraft, but battery power was needed to start the starboard engine equipped with a generator to recharge the batteries," the researcher writes.

& # 39; If the lost steering wheels unloaded the batteries sending distress calls, they could not start the engine.

"The only sensible thing was to send only radio calls when the engine was running and charging the batteries, but on the reef, the tide rises and the tide goes down."

According to Gillespie, based on a previous investigation with his colleague Bob Brandenburg, the signals could only be sent when the water was below 26 inches, leaving the tip of the propeller clear.

As suspected, Gillespie discovered that the timing of the emergency calls is aligned with the periods when the water on the reef would have been low.

Most were shipped at night, probably because the darkness offered cooler temperatures after long days in the harsh sun of the island.

Each period of active transmission lasted approximately one hour, with a period of silence lasting approximately one and a half hours.

This, according to Gillespie, is repeated every day until high tide or daylight.

In the week after the disappearance of his plane on July 2, 1937, there were 120 reports from around the world that claimed to have picked up radio signals and distress calls from Earhart, of which 57 were deemed credible.

In the week after the disappearance of his plane on July 2, 1937, there were 120 reports from around the world that claimed to have picked up radio signals and distress calls from Earhart, of which 57 were deemed credible.

In the week after the disappearance of his plane on July 2, 1937, there were 120 reports from around the world that claimed to have picked up radio signals and distress calls from Earhart, of which 57 were deemed credible.

Heartbreaking distress calls were picked up around the world by naval stations actively participating in the search, and casual listeners in their homes. Above, Earhart looks at the wing of his plane before his last flight in 1937

Heartbreaking distress calls were picked up around the world by naval stations actively participating in the search, and casual listeners in their homes. Above, Earhart looks at the wing of his plane before his last flight in 1937

Heartbreaking distress calls were picked up around the world by naval stations actively participating in the search, and casual listeners in their homes. Above, Earhart looks at the wing of his plane before his last flight in 1937

WHAT ARE THE THEORIES OF THE FINAL DAYS OF AMELIA EARHART?

Theory one: Amelia Earhart and Fred Noonan crash into the Pacific a few kilometers from their intended destination due to visibility and gas problems, and they die instantly.

Theory Two: Earhart and Noonan land on the island of Nikumaroro, where they then die at the hands of coconut crabs, which hunt during the night and grow up to three feet long. The name comes from its ability to open the hardened shells of coconuts.

Theory Three: Earhart and Noonan drastically deviate from their course and crash near the Mili Atoll in the Marshall Islands. They are rescued but then taken as prisoners of war by the Japanese and sent to a camp in Saipan. Noonan is beheaded and Earhart dies in 1939 for malaria or dysentery.

Theory Four: Earhart and Noonan arrive on Howland Island as planned and the cannibals eat them.

Theory Five: Earhart was an American spy sent to gather information about the Japanese before the Second World War.

Theory Six: Earhart and Noonan can not locate Howland Island, and they are heading towards their "contingency plan". After a ten-hour trip back to where they came from, they crash into the jungle of East New Britain Island, in what is now known as Papua New Guinea.

The alleged details of Earhart's last flight, and where it is believed he ended up based on different theories over the years

The alleged details of Earhart's last flight, and where it is believed he ended up based on different theories over the years

There are several contradictory theories about the disappearance of Earhart. The alleged details of Earhart's last flight, and where it is believed he ended up based on different theories over the years

On Saturday, July 3, during the sixth active period, a male voice was heard for the first time, suggesting that Noonan, although wounded, was still alive and "functioning rationally".

The next day, a 16-year-old boy from Wyoming heard the pilot say that the boat was on a reef. And, the station in Howland Island listened to both the voice of a man and a woman, with the message "tell your husband well".

On only one occasion, the crew sent Morse code, since none of them was an expert in the technique.

A "bad password" message received by the installation of the US Navy. UU In Wailupe, near Honolulu, on July 5 he declared: & # 39; 281 North Howland Call KHAQQ Beyond North will not stay much longer suspended over the water. & # 39;

Among the most famous are the fragments heard by Betty Klenck, 15, in St. Petersburg, Florida, that same day.

Using his family's radio, Klenck heard exchanges between Earhart and Noonan indicating that the injured boarder had become irrational.

In 1940, bones were discovered on Gardner Island, now called Nikumaroro (pictured), 400 miles south of Earhart's planned scale on Howland Island. An expert in skeletal biology now believes that bones are "99% likely" to be from Earhart

In 1940, bones were discovered on Gardner Island, now called Nikumaroro (pictured), 400 miles south of Earhart's planned scale on Howland Island. An expert in skeletal biology now believes that bones are "99% likely" to be from Earhart

In 1940, bones were discovered on Gardner Island, now called Nikumaroro (pictured), 400 miles south of Earhart's planned scale on Howland Island. An expert in skeletal biology now believes that bones are "99% likely" to be from Earhart

The two could be heard asking for help and discussing the surge of water urgently.

According to Klenck, Noonan could also be heard screaming and complaining about his head.

In his notes, Klenck wrote that Earheart said a few swear words and it seems he was having trouble getting water so high that the plane would glide.

The transmission ended shortly after.

According to Gillespie, the last active period occurred on Wednesday, July 7, from 12:25 a.m. at 1:30 a.m. The researcher's estimates indicate that the water level would have reached the cabin and the transmitter before 6 the next morning.

The photo shows how the high tide submerged the reef on Gardner Island

The photo shows how the high tide submerged the reef on Gardner Island

The photo shows how the high tide submerged the reef on Gardner Island

In one of the last messages of concern, Thelma Lovelace of St Johns, New Brunswick heard: "Can you read me? Can you read me? This is Amelia Earhart, this is Amelia Earhart, please come in."

She went on to give the latitude and longitude, which Lovelace wrote and then lost.

Then, Earhart continued: "We have taken water, my navigator is seriously injured. My browser is very hurt. We need medical attention and we must have help; We can not stand much longer.

After Wednesday, July 7, there were no more credible signs, leaving the last moments of Earhart and Noonan a mystery.

& # 39; At some point between 1:30 a.m. on Wednesday, July 7, when the last Credible Beyond transmission was sent to Reasonable Doubt, and on the morning of Friday, July 9, the Electra was dragged across the reef to the ocean where it separated and sank, "Gillespie wrote.

"When three US Navy search planes from the battleship USS Colorado flew over Gardner Island on the morning of Friday, July 9, no planes were seen."

A set of bones discovered on Gardner Island in 1940, now known as Nikumaroro, provided what is considered one of the best tests of the final resting place of the convicted pilot.

According to Richard Jantz, an expert in skeletal biology at the University of Tennessee who analyzed the skeleton, the remains are "99% likely" to be hers.

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