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Emergency call counselor Laura Pilling, in the photo, revealed that she is going to train as a paramedic after being inspired to help others after her mother died when she was twelve

Emergency response worker reveals that she was inspired to become a paramedic after her nurse mother died when she was 12 – for the dramatic new Ambulance series

  • Laura Pilling works as a 999 handling company for the North West Ambulance Service
  • She has revealed that she is going to train as a paramedic and is inspired by her mother
  • Mother was a nurse and died when Laura, who is in the BBC Ambulance series, was 12
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A 999 practitioner has revealed that she was inspired to become a paramedic after her mother died when she was just 12 years old.

Laura Pilling, who works for the North West Ambulance Service, appeared on This Morning today for the BBC Ambulance series that is starting again tonight.

The mother-of-two appears in the hit show as an emergency service operator and is seen for a difficult call where she helps someone word of mouth.

She also revealed how she now plans to go to college to train as a paramedic, something she has wanted since she lost her mother.

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Emergency call counselor Laura Pilling, in the photo, revealed that she is going to train as a paramedic after being inspired to help others after her mother died when she was twelve

Emergency call counselor Laura Pilling, in the photo, revealed that she is going to train as a paramedic after being inspired to help others after her mother died when she was twelve

Laura, left, appears on the new Ambulances series on BBC1 and is seen during a difficult call to become emotional when she has to instruct someone about word of mouth

Laura, left, appears on the new Ambulances series on BBC1 and is seen during a difficult call to become emotional when she has to instruct someone about word of mouth

Laura, left, appears on the new Ambulances series on BBC1 and is seen during a difficult call to become emotional when she has to instruct someone about word of mouth

Laura said: & I and my sister lost our mother when I was 12, it was a very traumatic experience. She had an external bleeding for us and died.

& # 39; After I had gone through it at a young age and had known the relief when paramedics came, I now want to go into someone's house to help them. & # 39;

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Laura, who has two young children, explained: & # 39; My mother was a nurse and would come home and say she had done something that made a difference.

& # 39; When she died, I also wanted to do something to help. I was determined and never gave up and now I will start a three-year paramedical training in September. & # 39;

Another staff member, to the right, has to step in and support Laura, on the left, during the high pressure call on Ambulance, which will be broadcast tonight

Another staff member, to the right, has to step in and support Laura, on the left, during the high pressure call on Ambulance, which will be broadcast tonight

Another staff member, to the right, has to step in and support Laura, on the left, during the high pressure call on Ambulance, which will be broadcast tonight

This morning hosts Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford asked Laura if the call she had seen during Ambulance took her back to the moment her mother died and if the job affected her.

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In a clip from the BBC One show, which is being broadcast tonight, Laura is seen with her headphones on instructing a caller on how to do first aid.

As she helps the person on the other end of the phone count between breaths during word of mouth, Laura becomes emotional and starts crying.

Another call handler from 999 comes to her desk to support Laura until paramedics arrive.

Eamonn and Ruth, on the left, immediately asked Laura if she was struck by her work and the practitioner said she would be & # 39; not human & # 39; if she didn't take what she heard with her every day

Eamonn and Ruth, on the left, immediately asked Laura if she was struck by her work and the practitioner said she would be & # 39; not human & # 39; if she didn't take what she heard with her every day

Eamonn and Ruth, on the left, immediately asked Laura if she was struck by her work and the practitioner said she would be & # 39; not human & # 39; if she didn't take what she heard with her every day

The mother of the two, in the photo, said she was & # 39; determined and never gave up & & # 39; and now a three-year university course is starting to train as a paramedic
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The mother of the two, in the photo, said she was & # 39; determined and never gave up & & # 39; and now a three-year university course is starting to train as a paramedic

The mother of the two, in the photo, said she was & # 39; determined and never gave up & & # 39; and now a three-year university course is starting to train as a paramedic

Laura admitted: & # 39; You just have to keep going and give the advice that you can.

& # 39; If you become a 999 call handler, you get six weeks of training in which you learn the procedures and then you have a mentor to help with calls, but then you fly alone.

& # 39; It can be difficult to separate yourself from work, but we wouldn't be human if we didn't go home and think about what we've heard. & # 39;

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During Laura & # 39; s appearance on This Morning, Eamonn revealed how, according to the NHS, one third of the paramedics experienced violence in the past year.

The presenter born in Belfast also hit & # 39; eegits & # 39; who complained about parked ambulances and had to avoid a bit when someone's life might be at stake.

Ruth also revealed that she once saw a friend have a heart attack and & # 39; had never been relieved to see two people in green & # 39; when the ambulance arrived.

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