Amazon is trying to make the warehouse even more fun by turning real tasks into video games

Amazon has been accused of dehumanizing its personnel & # 39; to deliver products to customers.

Employees at the online shopping giant's distribution centers are faced with disciplinary action if they lose a stiff race against the clock to find items ordered by online shoppers.

The staff paints a picture of a stressful environment ruled by the beeps of handheld devices – nicknamed & # 39; the gun & # 39; – and instructs them which items must be collected.

Bosses are said to push staff so far beyond the breaking point that they & # 39; practically & # 39; ignite, while regular layoffs to keep employees sharp were described by one HR manager as & # 39; targeted Darwinism & # 39 ;.

According to an exhibition last year, the best employees of the company are known as & # 39; Amabots & # 39; – because they are so & # 39; one with the system & # 39; that they are almost cyborgs.

In November, shocking statements were made about the online store's latest warehouse – which the company refers to as a & # 39; fulfillment center & # 39; – in Tilbury, Essex.

The packaging factory is the largest in Europe, the size of 11 football pitches, and will ship 1.2 million items this year.

In November, shocking statements were made about the online store's latest warehouse - which the company refers to as a & # 39; fulfillment center & # 39; - in Tilbury, Essex

In November, shocking statements were made about the online store's latest warehouse – which the company refers to as a & # 39; fulfillment center & # 39; – in Tilbury, Essex

The research, by an undercover reporter for the Sunday Mirror who spent five weeks there, suggested that employees would suffer mentally and physically if they tried to meet demand.

He said that some of his colleagues felt so tired of working 55 hours a week that they would sleep on their legs.

& # 39; Those who could not keep up with the disturbed goals stood in front of the bags – and some who had nestled under pressure had to be accompanied by ambulance personnel & # 39 ;, he added.

The following month it turned out that Amazon deliverers are being asked to deliver 200 packages per day, earn less than the minimum wage and urinate in bottles because there is no time to take a break

The Leigh Day law firm, which led a case against taxi giant Uber, represents seven drivers who say that the agencies that Amazon uses are abusing them.

Although Amazon doesn't use the & # 39; s drivers directly, the drivers recruited through agencies work through an Amazon app and follow delivery routes made by the company.

But drivers who have to deliver up to 200 packages per day say that traffic jams, weather and speed restrictions make it almost impossible to deliver all packages on time.

An Amazon spokesperson said: & # 39; Amazon offers a safe and positive workplace. The safety and well-being of our permanent and temporary employees is our main priority. & # 39;

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