Amazing war posters, designed by the British artist, are revealed in a new book

He had a huge impact on Britain during the Second World War without the public knowing his name or face.

Now the iconic war poster-graphic artist Abram Games, produced for the Winston Churchill government, has been merged into a new book by his daughter Naomi.

Mr Games was enlisted in the British army at the start of World War II, but his artistic talents led him to create recruitment posters for the War Office, including the famous and controversial & # 39; blonde bombshell & # 39; design of the Auxiliary Territorial Service (ATS).

Their success led him to produce a number of other propaganda, including warnings to spread war secrets, beware of discarded ammunition, and even guard against the spread of sexual diseases.

Mr Games started making posters for the army in 1941 and was given the official role of war artists a year later, producing 100 striking designs throughout the conflict.

One of his most recognizable posters was the ATS recruitment poster with a glamorous woman with red lipstick who became known as the & # 39; blonde bomb & # 39 ;.

It was released in 1941 and immediately caused controversies, when Conservative MP Thelma Cazalet claimed that it was the hardship of life in the army & # 39; misrepresented & # 39 ;. The Parliament finally decided to pull the poster out of circulation over the line and most copies were marred, although some still survive today.

In addition to the war, he also earned considerable success as a freelance designer and made graphic designs for Shell, Guinness, The Royal Shakespeare Company, London Zoo and The Metropolitan Police, among others.

Games died in 1996 at the age of 82 and in 2013 the National Army Museum in London acquired a collection of his posters. They will be on display during an exhibition in the museum that starts on April 5.

His war work, which was equally inspired and shocked, is commemorated in Naomi Games & Abram Games: His Wartime Work.

The controversial & # 39; Blonde Bombshell & # 39; ATS poster, pictured, was designed by Abram Games in 1941 but was quickly withdrawn after criticism in Parliament that it was the & # 39; wrong message & # 39; sent to women because it was too glamorous

Graphic designer Mr Games, who was the official British poster designer from 1942 to 1945, had his work commemorated in a new book, depicted, by his daughter Naomi

Graphic designer Mr Games, who was the official British poster designer from 1942 to 1945, had his work commemorated in a new book, depicted, by his daughter Naomi

A new book about the war works of graphic artist Abram Games, pictured on the right, has been released by his daughter Naomi with 100 of his striking designs. They include the controversial recruiting & # 39; Blonde Bombshell & # 39; poster for the Auxiliary Territorial Service, where women gave the army a number of supporting roles, including military police work, manning radar stations and anti-aircraft guns, inspecting ammunition, and driving troops. Released in 1941, it was quickly withdrawn after Parliament decided it was too glamorous and sent the & # 39; wrong message & # 39; to women who wanted to join the service, with most copies being bullied

This recruitment poster from 1940 is for the Women's Auxiliary Air Force, which in its peak in 1943 had 180,000 members. Recruits could serve as civilian pilots, but were never used in battle. Women's tasks include wrapping parachutes, manning barrage balloons, catering, codebreaking and working in radar stations

This recruitment poster from 1940 is for the Women's Auxiliary Air Force, which in its peak in 1943 had 180,000 members. Recruits could serve as civilian pilots, but were never used in battle. Women's tasks include wrapping parachutes, manning barrage balloons, catering, codebreaking and working in radar stations

Pictured is Mr Games' poster recruiting volunteers to employ the Royal Armored Corps, established in 1939 by incorporating units from the Line Cavalry. Recruits drove tanks and reconnaissance vehicles into battle

Pictured is Mr Games' poster recruiting volunteers to employ the Royal Armored Corps, established in 1939 by incorporating units from the Line Cavalry. Recruits drove tanks and reconnaissance vehicles into battle

Mr Games created recruitment posters for various regiments and units, including a 1940 advertisement for the Women's Auxiliary Air Force, pictured left, and the Royal Armored Corps, right. The WAAF had 180,000 members at its peak in 1943, with 2000 members a week. The members would never perform combat operations, but could work as civilian pilots, while also performing tasks such as catering, parachuting, breaking code and working in radar stations. The Royal Armored Corp. was established in 1939 after tank and cavalry regiments were brought together and recruits were used to drive tanks and reconnaissance vehicles into combat

Depicted is a woman who left at an ATS recruitment agency in Streatham, London, with posters made by Mr Games behind her. Despite the initial controversy over his Blonde Bombshell poster, he actually got a lot of creative freedom because his superiors liked to use his eye-catching style that combined several eye-catching images to stand out. He started making posters for the government in 1941 and in 1942 he was the official war artist

Depicted is a woman who left at an ATS recruitment agency in Streatham, London, with posters made by Mr Games behind her. Despite the initial controversy over his Blonde Bombshell poster, he actually got a lot of creative freedom because his superiors liked to use his eye-catching style that combined several eye-catching images to stand out. He started making posters for the government in 1941 and in 1942 he was the official war artist

Depicted is a woman who left at an ATS recruitment agency in Streatham, London, with posters made by Mr Games behind her. Despite the initial controversy over his Blonde Bombshell poster, he actually got a lot of creative freedom because his superiors liked to use his eye-catching style that combined several eye-catching images to stand out. He started making posters for the government in 1941 and in 1942 he was the official war artist

Another unit, Mr. Games, produced a recruitment poster for 1944 when the Royal Army Medical Corps Parachute Regiment, pictured, served as field workers during the Second World War, saw action in North Africa, Italy and Germany

Another unit, Mr. Games, produced a recruitment poster for 1944 when the Royal Army Medical Corps Parachute Regiment, pictured, served as field workers during the Second World War, saw action in North Africa, Italy and Germany

Mr Games not only produced recruitment posters and also created a series with other purposes, such as this public call of 1942 for civilians to knit socks needed for soldiers fighting in the jungles in Burma and Malaya.

Mr Games not only produced recruitment posters and also created a series with other purposes, such as this public call of 1942 for civilians to knit socks needed for soldiers fighting in the jungles in Burma and Malaya.

Among the 100 posters mentioned in the book about Mr. Games, one is from 1944 for the parachute unit of the Royal Army Medical Corps, pictured on the left, which in all war campaigns started the battle to set up field hospitals to support advancing troops. . The artist, who studied for only two terms at the St. Martin & # 39; s School of Art in London in 1930 before continuing his education with night classes in drawing, also produced a series of posters for public calls, including asking citizens to knit socks for soldiers fighting in the jungle. campaigns such as in Burma and Malaya in 1942, pictured on the right

This poster from 1942, made by Mr Games, was used as government propaganda to warn soldiers not to discuss battle plans and other military intelligence or to let the enemy learn from their movements, possibly resulting in the death of friends

This poster from 1942, made by Mr Games, was used as government propaganda to warn soldiers not to discuss battle plans and other military intelligence or to let the enemy learn from their movements, possibly resulting in the death of friends

Mr Games with striking posters was used to bring home the message that talking about troop and ship movements can be fatal for others. This poster was produced in 1944

Mr Games with striking posters was used to bring home the message that talking about troop and ship movements can be fatal for others. This poster was produced in 1944

Pictured left and right are posters of Mr. Games warning troops to prevent battle plans from being discussed or running the risk of having their friends killed. As the war continued and plans were made for the invasion of France and subsequent progress in Germany, the government became concerned about the leakage of information and ordered these posters to remind soldiers what was at stake as essential information got into the wrong hands. The concerns continued for years, with the poster on the left produced in 1942 and the poster on the right released in 1944. Mr Games used striking images such as dying soldiers and red markings on the poster on the right to bring the message home . The artist himself served in the Hertfordshire Regiment for two years after being conscripted in 1939, but was subsequently recruited by the government for his artistic skills.

This 1943 poster from Mr Games shows a child in a coffin after playing with a & # 39; blind & # 39; - live ammunition left behind by soldiers on training exercises in Great Britain. It serves as a warning for civilians to never touch ammunition and to report this to the military to ensure that it is safely removed

This 1943 poster from Mr Games shows a child in a coffin after playing with a & # 39; blind & # 39; - live ammunition left behind by soldiers on training exercises in Great Britain. It serves as a warning for civilians to never touch ammunition and to report this to the military to ensure that it is safely removed

Another poster from Mr Games warned soldiers walking around with their weapons for fear that they would hurt each other or even kill each other and harm the war

Another poster from Mr Games warned soldiers walking around with their weapons for fear that they would hurt each other or even kill each other and harm the war

Mr Games also produced posters to alert civilians and soldiers to the daily dangers of war. The poster on the left, from 1943, shows a child in a coffin after playing with a & # 39; blind & # 39; – live ammunition accidentally left behind during a training exercise in Great Britain. The image is designed to shock civilians to never come close to the ammunition they find and to report it to the army immediately. In the same way, the poster on the right was instructed to remind soldiers not to play with their weapons or to risk being responsible for the death or injury of their friends.

Mr Games also produced posters for the health department, including this call from 1943 for blood donors to help wounded soldiers in the front line

Mr Games also produced posters for the health department, including this call from 1943 for blood donors to help wounded soldiers in the front line

Another health service poster by Mr Games argued that British soldiers and civilians should not be promiscuous and run the risk of losing troops for sexually transmitted diseases. It was produced in 1941

Another health service poster by Mr Games argued that British soldiers and civilians should not be promiscuous and run the risk of losing troops for sexually transmitted diseases. It was produced in 1941

Through his work in the government, Mr. Games also produced posters for the health services, again for purposes of calls and warnings. The poster on the left, from 1943, is part of a blood drive to help physicians at the front line of wounded soldiers, while the poster on the right, from 1941, shows how the government was trying to avoid soldiers during the war promiscuous. Using the slogan & # 39; Stay straight, stay sober & # 39; and the image of a soldier in the spotlight, Mr. Games tried to convince both the army and the public at home to prevent fraternization and spread of sexual diseases

One of the most striking posters produced by Mr Games was this call for clothing for victims of the Holocaust from 1946. The artist himself came from a Jewish background and was not shocked by the use of the image of an emaciated prisoner who reflected the horrific circumstances of the Jews in concentration camps

One of the most striking posters produced by Mr Games was this call for clothing for victims of the Holocaust from 1946. The artist himself came from a Jewish background and was not shocked by the use of the image of an emaciated prisoner who reflected the horrific circumstances of the Jews in concentration camps

Mr Games also designed this 1942 poster that encouraged Britons to grow their own food during the war in order to cope with rationing and reduce dependence on imports, with merchant shipping severely disrupted by German attacks

Mr Games also designed this 1942 poster that encouraged Britons to grow their own food during the war in order to cope with rationing and reduce dependence on imports, with merchant shipping severely disrupted by German attacks

One of Mr Games' most striking posters was a call for clothing for victims of the Holocaust in 1946, pictured left. The artist himself came from a Jewish background and did not shy away from using the image of an emaciated prisoner who reflected the horrific conditions that many Jews endure in concentration camps. He also designed the 1942 poster on the right that encouraged Britons to grow their own food during the war in order to cope with rationing and reduce dependence on imports, severely disrupting merchant shipping due to German attacks. After leaving the civil service in 1946, his Whitehall superiors paid a tribute to him and said: & # 39; His work had to be subtly persuasive, or immediately & # 39; propagandistic & # 39; but it was always effective, convincing and of excellent quality. & # 39;

Another warning poster from 1943, designed by Mr. Games, said the public should avoid dropping almost unexploded or half buried bombs during the Blitz to prevent civilian casualties. This poster seems to be aimed primarily at children by telling them not to throw stones at the explosives

Another warning poster from 1943, designed by Mr. Games, said the public should avoid dropping almost unexploded or half buried bombs during the Blitz to prevent civilian casualties. This poster seems to be aimed primarily at children by telling them not to throw stones at the explosives

This poster from 1942 by Mr Games looks like something from a horror film, in which the shadowy hand and the red font convey the message that warfare with war material can only harm society

This poster from 1942 by Mr Games looks like something from a horror film, in which the shadowy hand and the red font convey the message that warfare with war material can only harm society

Some of Mr Games's posters used fairly simplistic images, others had to be incredibly detailed, such as the poster on the left, from 1943, with specific drawings of bombs and explosives in a warning to the public to never touch them and report them found for the police. It also seems to be aimed at children, because the text warns them not to throw stones at bombs and runs the risk of turning it off. Meanwhile, the poster on the right, from 1942, discourages people from stealing war material and looks like something from a horror movie with a shadowy hand and a red font to emphasize the warning

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