Amanda Keller accuses Ben Fordham and Alan Jones of ‘stirring up’ anti-lockdown riots

Radio personality Amanda Keller has accused her breakfast rival Ben Fordham and conservative commentator Alan Jones of “whipping up” the anti-lockdown riots that resulted in clashes with police in Australia.

Sydney’s city center was a scene of chaos on Saturday afternoon as 3,500 protesters stormed the streets to denounce the restrictions.

Riot control horses were needed to contain the crowd and 5,500 reports were made to the police, with 63 people arrested so far for violating a public health order.

Keller, the breakfast co-host on WSFM, suggested that Fordham, her 2GB rival, and his predecessor Alan Jones, now on Sky News, were responsible for making people angry enough to revolt.

“There are a lot of people who are frustrated with this lockdown, of course they are, but there are a lot of people responsible for the whipping up: people from other radio stations,” she said.

Daily Mail Australia does not suggest that Fordham or Jones have sparked anti-lockdown protests, with the rally being staged mainly on social media by conspiracy theorists and anti-vaxxers even disputing the existence of Covid-19.

Both media personalities have questioned lockdown policies but have not denied the danger of the disease itself or told anyone not to follow public health regulations.

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Radio personality Amanda Keller has accused her breakfast rival Ben Fordham and conservative commentator Alan Jones of ‘stimulating’ anti-lockdown riots

Keller’s co-host Brendan Jones asked, “What other radio stations?”

Keller replied, “I think Ben Fordham said, ‘This closing is ridiculous.’

‘The Sky hosts, Alan Jones, etc., ‘Why are we having this lockdown?’

“It’s counterproductive. It whips all this up.’

Keller compared the anti-lockdown protesters in Sydney to Americans rioting in front of Donald Trump in January 2021 in the Washington DC Capitol in an attempt to stop the electoral college from certifying Joe Biden as the winner of November’s presidential election.

“It’s like watching Trump rallies,” she said.

Jones then went on to bring up Alan Jones’ controversial comments ahead of the December 2005 Cronulla riots in southern Sydney.

“It’s not like Alan Jones to cause some sort of riot, not like Cronulla 2005,” he said.

Sydney's city center was a scene of chaos on Saturday afternoon as hundreds of protesters stormed the streets to denounce the restrictions.  Riot control horses were needed to contain the crowd and 5,500 reports were made to police, with 63 people arrested so far (including this man, pictured) for violating a public health order

Sydney’s city center was a scene of chaos on Saturday afternoon as hundreds of protesters stormed the streets to denounce the restrictions. Riot control horses were needed to contain the crowd and 5,500 reports were made to police, with 63 people arrested so far (including this man, pictured) for violating a public health order

The Australian Communications and Media Authority discovered in 2007 that Alan Jones had vilified and encouraged violence of people of Middle Eastern ethnicity.

Last week, two days before Saturday’s riots, Fordham labeled the lockdowns an “easy option” for bureaucrats.

“And work damn hard for everyone else,” he said on July 22.

‘Sydney is a difficult city. It’s the Australian version of New York: If you can make it here, you can make it anywhere, but that doesn’t mean we’ll be sheep-treated and hypnotized by the mythical health advice forever.

“We want to know the facts: what justified each decision? What are the goals to get out of this?

Amanda Keller, the breakfast co-host on WSFM, suggested that Ben Fordham (pictured), her 2GB rival, and his predecessor Alan Jones, now on Sky News, were responsible for making people angry enough to riot. to come

Amanda Keller, the breakfast co-host on WSFM, suggested that Ben Fordham (pictured), her 2GB rival, and his predecessor Alan Jones, now on Sky News, were responsible for making people angry enough to riot. to come

If plan A fails, what is plan B? We have to get to a point where we have to learn to live with the virus because it’s not going anywhere.

“That doesn’t mean we let it pass through the community. It means gradually increasing freedoms where it is safe to do so.’

In GfK breakfast radio ratings for early July, Fordham was second behind Kyle Sandilands and Jackie ‘O’ Henderson with a 13.3 percent share of listeners, with Keller and Brendan Jones at 8 percent.

In his Sky News program, Jones was much more critical of the stricter lockdowns imposed by New South Wales Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian.

In his Sky News programme, Alan Jones (pictured) was much more critical of the stricter lockdowns imposed by New South Wales Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian

In his Sky News programme, Alan Jones (pictured) was much more critical of the stricter lockdowns imposed by New South Wales Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian

“The anger out there is white-hot. Maybe we can have a compendium of some of the nonsense that has been touted to us, because it’s clear that workers, businesses, families and teenage children are all stupid,” he said.

“Think Gladys Berejiklian in May – “I fear for Victoria and I worry about what their government can do. We’ve shown other states that it’s possible to contain an outbreak and not shut down a city.”

“Not a word of apology from Berejiklian for being hopelessly wrong.”

During the 13-minute segment on July 22, Alan Jones criticized the lockdown and mask rules, but did not suggest that people should demonstrate in the street in violation of a public health order.

Rami Ykmour, the co-founder of the restaurant chain Rashays, said the closures had reduced revenues at its 21 Sydney stores by 70 percent, 11 of which were in the hardest-hit areas of southwestern and western Sydney.

Rami Ykmour, co-founder of Rashays restaurant (pictured with his wife and business partner Shannon) said the lockdowns had caused revenues at his 21 stores in Sydney to fall by 70 percent, 11 of which were in the hardest-hit areas. from southwest and western Sydney

Rami Ykmour, co-founder of Rashays restaurant (pictured with his wife and business partner Shannon) said the lockdowns had caused revenues at his 21 stores in Sydney to fall by 70 percent, 11 of which were in the hardest-hit areas. from southwest and western Sydney

The entrepreneur, who works out of Chester Hill with his wife Shannon, said he was against people rising up during a pandemic but understood why many were frustrated by the lockdown.

“I am absolutely against the riots, that’s 100 percent,” he told the Daily Mail Australia on Monday.

‘I could understand people’s frustration: people are desperate when they have their backs against a wall, they tend to do things they probably wouldn’t do under normal circumstances.

“That’s what I fear is happening out there.”

Mr Ykmour is calling for a revival of JobKeeper’s wage subsidies rather than an immediate end to lockdowns as restrictions prevent service workers in western Sydney from affording takeaway food in restaurants.

Daily Mail Australia has reached out to both Fordham and Alan Jones for comment.

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