Almost half of women mistakenly believe that they will not catch HPV if they have a long-term relationship

Nearly half of women mistakenly believe they will not catch HPV if they have a long-term relationship, reveals & # 39; disturbing & # 39; poll

  • About 1500 British women were questioned about their knowledge of the infection
  • Jo & # 39; s Cervical Cancer Trust, behind the research, said the findings & # 39; disturbing & # 39; goods
  • HPV is known to cause 3,100 cases of cervical cancer every year
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Hundreds of thousands of women mistakenly believe that they will not catch HPV if they have a long-term relationship, a poll suggests.

About 1,500 British women were questioned about their knowledge of the infection, which is thought to cause 99 percent of cervical cancer cases.

The results showed that almost half (48 percent) do not think they are at risk for the disease if they have had a monogamous relationship for some time.

Jo & # 39; s Cervical Cancer Trust described the findings as & # 39; alarming & # 39; as it is known that this causes 3,100 cases of the disease every year in the UK.

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About 1,500 women were questioned about their thoughts about the infection, which is thought to cause 99 percent of cervical cancer cases

About 1,500 women were questioned about their thoughts about the infection, which is thought to cause 99 percent of cervical cancer cases

The charity, which together with Roche, a pharmaceutical company, conducted the survey said it & # 39; essential & # 39; is to break through myths about HPV.

Having a long-term relationship does not take away the risk of getting HPV, which will get up to eight in 10 people at some point in their lives.

Symptoms can be dormant for many years and both men and women can be reinfected several times during their lifetime.

However, the study also found that about seven percent think that if their partner receives an HPV diagnosis, they have been unfaithful.

While 17 percent – and a quarter of the over-55s – said that sexual promiscuity is the most important risk factor for cervical cancer.

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Just over a fifth said they have no idea how HPV is transmitted and 52 percent said they did not know that both men and women can be infected.

& # 39; It is worrying to see so many myths and stigma related to HPV, & # 39; said Robert Music, CEO of Jo & # 39; s Cervical Cancer Trust.

& # 39; More insight into HPV, including what having the virus means, how it gets contracted and how long it stays in the body, is essential. & # 39;

Vicki Bokor Ingram, head of cervical cancer at Roche, described the misunderstandings that emerged in the study as & # 39; dangerous & # 39 ;.

All schoolgirls in Great Britain receive the vaccine against HPV at the age of 12 or 13 years since 2008.

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However, from September the government will roll out vaccinations for boys, following an important decision last summer.

HPV is thought to cause around 2500 cases of cancer in men each year and around 650 deaths, mainly from throat and cancer.

The study also found that 42 percent of women believe they do not need to be screened for cervical cancer if they have already been vaccinated.

About 44 percent admitted that they had delayed or chose not to make an appointment for cervical cancer screening after receiving an invitation.

And about a quarter (26 percent) of people over 55 said it was unlikely to book an appointment after an invitation in the future.

WHAT IS HPV? THE INFECTION ASSOCIATED WITH 99% OF CERVIC CANCER CASES

Up to eight out of 10 people are infected with HPV in their lives
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Up to eight out of 10 people are infected with HPV in their lives

Up to eight out of 10 people are infected with HPV in their lives

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the name for a group of viruses that affect your skin and the moist membranes along your body.

Spread through vaginal, anal and oral sex and skin-to-skin contact between genitals, it is very common.

Up to eight in ten people will be infected with the virus at some point in their lives.

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There are more than 100 types of HPV. About 30 of them can affect the genital area. Genital HPV infections are common and highly contagious.

Many people never show symptoms because they can occur years after infection and most cases disappear without treatment.

It can lead to genital warts and it is also known to create cervical cancer caused by abnormal tissue growth.

Annually, an average of 38,000 cases of HPV-related cancers are diagnosed in the US, 3,100 cases of cervical cancer in the UK and about 2,000 other cancers in men.

HPV can also cause cancer of the throat, neck, tongue, tonsils, vulva, vagina, penis or anus. It can take years for cancer to develop.

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