Almost 40% of Americans think they can do all their work four days a week

This chart illustrates the main reasons why American workers have referred to burnout in the workplace

Nearly 40 percent of Americans believe they can achieve five days of work in a four-day work week, according to a new survey.

If given the option to make the same amount of money but change the hours to a different number of days, 39.7 percent say that four days a week is the ideal place, while 27.1 percent prefer to stay five days a week, according to a report by Future Workplace, a research advisory firm based in New York.

Another 21.1 percent said they would only need to work three days a week, while the remaining 12 percent would prefer to work two days or less per week, all while doing the regular amount of work.

This chart illustrates the main reasons why American workers have referred to burnout in the workplace

This chart illustrates the main reasons why American workers have referred to burnout in the workplace

"Americans want a little more balance between work and personal time because 61 percent say that work interferes with their personal lives," said Dan Schawbel, research director of Future Workplace. "Especially in the United States, where the average working week is 47 hours a week and not having your phone is the new vacation."

If given the option to receive a pay cut of 20 percent in exchange for a four-day work week, 24 percent of Americans would take the opportunity, 61 percent would reject it and 15 percent would still not be insurance.

More than 27 percent of Americans say that work interferes with their personal life always or very often, while 34.1 percent say it is a problem at times and 38.6 percent say it rarely or never happens.

The majority of US workers UU They believe that the 8-hour workday is longer than necessary, assuming they are allowed to work without interruptions.

If it was possible to work uninterruptedly, 31 percent of them said they could complete their daily responsibilities in 3-5 hours, while 28.8 percent said it would take between 5 and 7 hours.

The main interruption that cost them the time was to solve a problem caused by another person: 28.8 percent said that was the reason why they ended up losing productive time at work. Another 11.8 percent said that meetings were a waste of time, while 12.6 percent blamed administrative tasks.

"They want to stop doing a job that does not have a big impact: more administrative material than they want eliminated," Schawbel said. "Artificial intelligence could be a way to help them carry out a job that has a great impact on their company and gives them meaning in their lives."

This table illustrates what percentage of Americans believe that they have enough flexibility in their work schedule to maintain a balance between work and health.

This table illustrates what percentage of Americans believe that they have enough flexibility in their work schedule to maintain a balance between work and health.

This table illustrates what percentage of Americans believe that they have enough flexibility in their work schedule to maintain a balance between work and health.

Nearly 57 percent of Americans agree or strongly agree that they have enough flexibility in their professional agenda to have a healthy work-life balance, while 18 percent disagree or disagree and 25.5 percent disagree. One hundred is not sure.

Many have flexibility in where they work, with almost 22 percent saying they work remotely very often or always, and 18.2 percent reporting that they sometimes work outside the office. Another 45 percent say they never work remotely and 14.9 percent do so infrequently.

The majority (56.5 percent) of Americans said they do not feel pressured to work more hours or take extra shifts, but another 13.3 percent reported feeling that their manager was waiting for additional time at work and 23.3 percent said they were pressured to themselves. Another 6.9 percent said they felt pressure internally and from managers.

The main reason Americans felt burned in the workplace was the lack of trained co-workers, and 29 percent of respondents cited it as a source of stress. Other causes were unfair compensations and unreasonable workloads, with each of them identified as a problem by 26 percent of the workers.

"New alerts and emails always arrive, so we feel we are always working," said Schawbel. "It might look good for the companies on the surface, but then the workers run out … and end up leaving."

This chart shows the main work activities that US employees see as a waste of time

This chart shows the main work activities that US employees see as a waste of time

This chart shows the main work activities that US employees see as a waste of time

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