Alex Scott Reveals Being Pressured To Freeze Her Eggs As She Makes The Cover Of Women’s Health

BBC presenter Alex Scott, 36, reveals she is being pressured by friends to freeze her eggs and asked why she is single ‘all the time’


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Since joining Strictly Come Dancing in 2019, her career has skyrocketed.

And football player and TV host Alex Scott, 36, has now revealed that she’s been pressured by friends to freeze her eggs, and is constantly “back and forth” with the idea, explaining that therapy is helping her.

As he graces the October cover of Women’s Health, the former footballer also confessed that she is asked why she is single ‘all the time’.

Candid: Alex Scott, 36, has now revealed that she is being pressured by friends to freeze her eggs, and constantly goes 'back and forth' with the idea, explaining that therapy is helping her

Candid: Alex Scott, 36, has now revealed that she is being pressured by friends to freeze her eggs, and constantly goes ‘back and forth’ with the idea, explaining that therapy is helping her

About freezing her eggs, Alex told the publication, “It’s still something I go back and forth to.

“Sometimes my friends pressure me, ‘Alex, you’re not getting any younger, you have to do this.’

“But right now I love life – so why pressure myself because other people say now is the time to freeze your eggs?”

Discussing the positive impact of therapy, Alex gushed, “Going to therapy was definitely the most enlightening thing I’ve ever done in my life. I love it. I will never stop.

Cover star: While graced the cover of Women's Health in October, the former footballer also confessed to being asked why she's single 'all the time'

Cover star: While graced the cover of Women's Health in October, the former footballer also confessed to being asked why she's single 'all the time'

Cover star: While graced the cover of Women’s Health in October, the former footballer also confessed to being asked why she’s single ‘all the time’

Pressure: ‘Sometimes my friends pressure me: ‘Alex, you’re not getting any younger, you have to do this,’ the star revealed

Love life! “But right now I love life – so why pressure myself because other people say now is the time to freeze your eggs?” asked Alex

“Therapy is helping me, so why don’t I talk about it?” [freezing her eggs]? With a woman’s decision to freeze her eggs – you do it for you, progressive, why be ashamed of that?

‘To be [about] removing the stigmas that other people impose on you. I get that all the time, “Why are you single?” Like, sorry, do I have to be with someone?! [laughs].

‘On my days off, I just want to hang out with my girlfriends, go to a theater performance, listen to music or drink a few wines. I’m not going to apologize for being single.’

Take ownership! “With a woman’s decision to freeze her eggs – you’re doing it for you, progressive, why be ashamed of it?” the former football player asked

Only! “I get that all the time, ‘Why are you single?’ Like, sorry, do I have to be with someone?! [laughs]… I’m not going to apologize for being single’

Alex will soon appear in a new series of Who Do You Think You Are? when the show returns to BBC One in October.

The broadcaster investigates her mother’s Jewish ancestry and discovers that her great-grandfather fought fascism in 1936 in the East End of London.

She travels to Jamaica to discover the history on the other side of the family and learns of immense hardship and suffering, as well as an uneasy and disturbing history.

Read the full interview with Alex Scott in the October issue of Women’s Health UK, on ​​sale September 14, 2021, also available as a digital edition.

Looking back: Alex learns about her Jewish and Jamaican heritage and ancestors who endured tremendous hardship in a new series of Who Do You Think You Are?

Looking back: Alex learns about her Jewish and Jamaican heritage and ancestors who endured tremendous hardship in a new series of Who Do You Think You Are?

Looking back: Alex learns about her Jewish and Jamaican heritage and ancestors who endured tremendous hardship in a new series of Who Do You Think You Are?

To freeze eggs or not? All the pros and cons for women in their 30s

A rising number of women have frozen their eggs in recent years as part of a decision to suspend motherhood and pursue a career.

Some women choose to freeze their eggs to preserve their fertility, increasing their chances of having a child in their late 30s or 40s.

Others do this because they are receiving treatment, such as chemotherapy, which can be toxic to their ovaries or eggs, or have underlying conditions that can harm their fertility.

Here MailOnline discusses the pros and cons of freezing your eggs.

cons

The cost of egg freezing is one of its main drawbacks.

On average, women have to pay £3,350 to have their eggs collected and frozen. Medication needed to conceive costs up to £1,500 while storage is up to £350 a year.

And thawing eggs and transferring them to the uterus costs an average of £2,500.

The expensive procedure is also not a guaranteed success.

The birth rate from using frozen eggs is on the rise, but stands at one in five, according to the Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority.

This is compared to a 30 percent success rate when using “fresh” eggs during IVF, which are harvested during the procedure.

Pros

The main advantage of egg freezing is that it relieves women’s biological clocks and gives them flexibility during motherhood.

‘Standard’ IVF, which uses a woman’s own eggs harvested for use, does not resolve age-related decline in fertility over time, as it cannot reverse the egg degeneration associated with aging.

It also gives women more options compared to freezing an embryo — an egg fertilized before freezing — as a woman who doesn’t yet know who she would like to have a child with.

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