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A helicopter pilot who was told that he would never walk again has surpassed the odds and learned to use his legs. Alex Lawrie (photo) worked his dream job as a helicopter pilot flying around tourists in Uluru, Australia

& # 39; It was unbearable & # 39 ;: Certain pilot, 33, describes the moment he crashed his helicopter and was left paralyzed – before defying the chance to run again just 18 months later

  • Alex Lawrie worked his dream job as a helicopter pilot flying Uluru tourists
  • Until one afternoon the helicopter lost power and crashed and crushed its vertebrae
  • Alex, 33, was told he would never walk again, but started using his legs in 18 months
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A helicopter pilot who was told that he would never walk again exceeded the odds and learned to use his legs again.

Alex Lawrie, 33, worked his dream job of flying tourists around Uluru in January 2018.

One afternoon his helicopter lost power seconds after taking off and dropped to the ground.

Miraculously, all three people on board survived, but Alex was left seriously injured.

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A helicopter pilot who was told that he would never walk again has surpassed the odds and learned to use his legs. Alex Lawrie (photo) worked his dream job as a helicopter pilot flying around tourists in Uluru, Australia

A helicopter pilot who was told that he would never walk again has surpassed the odds and learned to use his legs. Alex Lawrie (photo) worked his dream job as a helicopter pilot flying around tourists in Uluru, Australia

& # 39; I did not realize the extent of my injuries. I was in unbearable pain – I never realized or thought I was paraplegic, & he said An ongoing case.

After the operation, doctors told the once active young man that his 13th vertebrae had been crushed and that he would never walk again.

& # 39; I said to them: "No, I will walk again", & # 39; Alex revealed.

And he did everything to prove them wrong.

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The helicopter lost the power seconds after taking off one afternoon in January last year and dropped to the ground (photo)

& # 39; I did not realize the extent of my injuries. I was in unbearable pain - I didn't realize at any time or thought I was paraplegic, & said the 33-year-old (pictured in the stretcher)

& # 39; I did not realize the extent of my injuries. I was in unbearable pain - I didn't realize at any time or thought I was paraplegic, & said the 33-year-old (pictured in the stretcher)

After the operation, doctors told the once active young man that his 13th vertebrae had been crushed (photo) and that he would never walk again

After the operation, doctors told the once active young man that his 13th vertebrae had been crushed (photo) and that he would never walk again

& # 39; I did not realize the extent of my injuries. I was in quite unbearable pain – I didn't realize at any time or thought that I was paraplegic, & said the 33-year-old (photo left in the stretcher). After the operation, doctors told the once active young man that his 13th vertebrae had been crushed (photo on the right), and he would never walk again

Over the next 18 months, Alex underwent Neurophysics – a treatment designed to rewire neural pathways to help his legs function.

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Alex could barely get out of his chair when he first started therapy.

Now he can stand and move with the help of calipers – something doctors said he could never do.

His WorkCover insurer Allianz said the $ 4,000 per month therapy is no longer worth it, but Alex is determined to continue and will fight to keep trying.

The helicopter, which carried the pilot and three passengers, landed on January 17 at a remote location near Yulara, close to Uluru in the Northern Territory.

Alex was transferred to Royal Adelaide Hospital, and another passenger on board suffered fractures and chest injuries and was treated at Alice Springs Hospital.

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The third passenger walked away largely unscathed.

Over the next 18 months, Alex underwent Neurophysics - a treatment designed to rewire neural pathways to help his legs function. Alex could barely get out of his chair when he first started therapy. Now he can stand and move with the help of calipers - something doctors said he could never do (photo)

Over the next 18 months, Alex underwent Neurophysics - a treatment designed to rewire neural pathways to help his legs function. Alex could barely get out of his chair when he first started therapy. Now he can stand and move with the help of calipers - something doctors said he could never do (photo)

Over the next 18 months, Alex underwent Neurophysics – a treatment designed to rewire neural pathways to help his legs function. Alex could barely get out of his chair when he first started therapy. Now he can stand and move with the help of calipers – something doctors said he could never do (photo)

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