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Aldi: Greengrocer declares war on supermarkets with a very brutal act

A foul-mouthed fruit grower has challenged ALDI to match its low prices for fresh fruit and vegetables as Aussies continue to be hit by rising supermarket bills.

Johnny Kapiris, the proud owner of St Bernards Fruit and Veg in Rostrevor in eastern Adelaide, revealed what he really thought of the chain’s prices in a cheeky photo taken outside the front doors of his local shop.

In the not-so-subtle snap, the greengrocer has dropped his jeans and turned his bum at the camera while declaring war on the supermarket giant.

Kapiris told Facebook users they could buy broccoli for $1.99 per pound and strawberries for $3.99 per tray from his store this week and invited ALDI to match the low prices for fresh produce.

“Come on you imported f****, I’m your master,” he captioned the photo.

“Karen’s comments will be deleted and blocked.”

Johnny Kapiris, the proud owner of St Bernards Fruit and Veg in Rostrevor in eastern Adelaide, revealed in the cheeky snap what he really thought of the German supermarket chain

Johnny Kapiris, the proud owner of St Bernards Fruit and Veg in Rostrevor in eastern Adelaide, revealed in the cheeky snap what he really thought of the German supermarket chain

Kapiris told Facebook users they could buy broccoli for $1.99 a kilo and strawberries for $3.99 a tray at his grocer, challenging ALDI to match its low prices.

Kapiris told Facebook users they could buy broccoli for $1.99 a kilo and strawberries for $3.99 a tray at his grocer, challenging ALDI to match its low prices.

Kapiris told Facebook users they could buy broccoli for $1.99 a kilo and strawberries for $3.99 a tray at his grocer, challenging ALDI to match its low prices.

The outspoken fruit grower has become known for his lavish rants about the rising cost of fruit and vegetables across Australia.

In June, he denounced companies for using inflation as an excuse to overcharge for fresh produce, labeling them “money-hungry f***s.”

Kapiris told the Daily Mail Australia that he had taken the photo to encourage residents to buy their groceries from local independents rather than large companies.

“I chatted with ALDI for a long time,” he explained.

“When I do my chatter, I go full steam ahead. I don’t have millions of dollars to spend on advertising, but I have a bunch of balls and I can tell the truth.”

The grocer explained that his friction with the German supermarket started more than five years ago when he owned a greengrocer in south Adelaide.

The store was eventually forced to close, with Mr Kapiris putting some of the blame on an ALDI store that opened in the same area.

When asked why he had a particular complaint about ALDI, he said the chain was the last supermarket to “get on board” and have entered an already saturated market.

Mr Kapiris (pictured) told Daily Mail Australia he had taken the photo to encourage residents to buy their groceries from local independents rather than large companies

Mr Kapiris (pictured) told Daily Mail Australia he had taken the photo to encourage residents to buy their groceries from local independents rather than large companies

Mr Kapiris (pictured) told Daily Mail Australia he had taken the photo to encourage residents to buy their groceries from local independents rather than large companies

‘Coles and Woolworths have been around since I was born,’ explained Mr Kapiris.

“ALDI was the last one here and it’s a foreign company.”

The grocer hopes his social media stunts will encourage people to shop locally and said locals have flocked to St Bernard’s in recent weeks.

“My shop is flat, it’s always been a busy shop,” said the grocer. “Aldi has inspired me to go full steam ahead.

‘The whole idea is to get some attention and independence for local businesses.

“We need to grow some balls and not let ourselves go bankrupt. People should take a look around before we’re all gone.’

ALDI has not directly commented on the image and Daily Mail Australia. instead, be on the lookout for the supermarket’s most recent price report.

The report found that buying groceries at ALDI is at least 15.6% cheaper than other supermarkets, saving an average family $1,555 a year — even if they already buy the cheapest products from a competitor.

1660109495 432 Aldi Greengrocer declares war on supermarkets with a very brutal

1660109495 432 Aldi Greengrocer declares war on supermarkets with a very brutal

Facebook users were divided over the attack on ALDI, some wondered why Kapiris didn’t fall for other supermarkets and others called him a “legend”

“The price gap widens significantly to 24.7% when comparing ALDI prices to similar branded products, saving the average family $2,468 a year if they usually buy branded groceries,” the report states.

It also found that more than three-quarters (78%) of Aussie shoppers had reduced their purchases in the past 12 months to save money, with plans to do the same next year.

Facebook users were divided over the attack on ALDI, with some wondering why he didn’t attack other supermarkets and others labeling him a “legend”.

‘Mate you are a serious legend, wish you were here in NSW, it would be an honor to buy from you. Keep up your great work!’ a man wrote.

‘Why are you only picking on ALDI? Have you seen the prices at Coles and Woollies?’ another asked the grocer.

“Australia currently exports more than it imports and the fresh vegetables sold by Aldi are ALL locally sourced. Just say to keep it REAL,” said another.

“But your attacks on ALDI are so funny.”

Kapiris told Facebook users they could buy broccoli for $1.99 a kilo (pictured) and strawberries for $3.99 a tray this week from his store and invited ALDI to match its low prices.

Kapiris told Facebook users they could buy broccoli for $1.99 a kilo (pictured) and strawberries for $3.99 a tray this week from his store and invited ALDI to match its low prices.

Kapiris told Facebook users they could buy broccoli for $1.99 a kilo (pictured) and strawberries for $3.99 a tray this week from his store and invited ALDI to match its low prices.

An eccentric Australian greengrocer has complained that other stores are using inflation as an excuse to inflate prices and has explained how he keeps prices so low in a viral video (pictured, Johnny Kapiris, left with his wife and business partner Leannda)

An eccentric Australian greengrocer has complained that other stores are using inflation as an excuse to inflate prices and has explained how he keeps prices so low in a viral video (pictured, Johnny Kapiris, left with his wife and business partner Leannda)

An eccentric Australian greengrocer has complained that other stores are using inflation as an excuse to inflate prices and has explained how he keeps prices so low in a viral video (pictured, Johnny Kapiris, left with his wife and business partner Leannda)

The greengrocer has previously called on politicians and companies to lower the cost of living for families and combatants.

“Every f***er in Australia and the world is using inflation as an excuse to drive up their damn prices so they can fuck anyone,” Mr Kapiris said in the now viral video.

He was also flooded with praise for his brutal honesty on social media.

“I suppose they say that because I’m passionate, and I’m real. I’m not spoiling anything, mate,” he previously told the Daily Mail Australia.

“I think my first policy would be to abolish the fuel tax to lower the fuel price for consumers and businesses.

‘Government aid must start with the energy bill. Water, gas and electricity bills all need to be capped or discounted.

“I would also like to save on electricity costs, but the idiots have sold everything to foreign companies so they can’t tell them what the prices should be.”

Mr Kapiris explained that by cutting utility costs, hard-working Australians would have more money to spend on the economy.

“The more people have in their pockets at the end of the week, the more they put back into the economy,” he said. “The government just tells us inflation is rising, but they don’t do anything to really help us.”

The grocer tries to isolate customers from extra costs and as soon as he can buy fruit and vegetables at lower prices, he charges the prices.

“So if we pay $14.99 a pound of broccoli and we get a $4.99 load, we automatically pass that along, we don’t milk it for a few weeks and try to get away with it like some stores do. ‘

Mr Kapiris claims that retail companies have a completely different view of business than family businesses.

Mr Kapiris says it is the consumer's responsibility to check that they are getting value when they go shopping

Mr Kapiris says it is the consumer's responsibility to check that they are getting value when they go shopping

Mr Kapiris says it is the consumer’s responsibility to check that they are getting value when they go shopping

“They are driven by shareholders, they have to show big profits to shareholders so that more people invest in their company. With self-employed people you are a family business and you are literally part of the community.’

Mr Kapiris said retailers can still prevent prices from rising exorbitantly – if they put their customers first.

Because the role of major retailers is different from that of family businesses, Kapiris says it’s the consumer’s responsibility to check that they’re getting value when they shop.

“The most important thing is that consumers open their eyes and know what they are going to spend their money on before taking it out of their wallets,” he explains.

“So open your eyes and be smarter instead of going somewhere just because it suits you.”

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