Alabama man who applied for & # 39; work from home & # 39; job online was misled to ship weapons to Russia

Alabama man, 37, who applied for a & # 39; work from home & # 39; job online, was misled to ship weapons to Russia – and now he is jailed

  • Douglas Glover, 37, from Birmingham, Alabama, pleaded guilty in April of an attempted illicit export of firearms and was sentenced to 16 months
  • He told the authorities in December 2016 that he accidentally started sending illegal goods after he responded to a job posting on Monster.com
  • Someone named & # 39; Ginger M. Towers & # 39; used from a company that self & # 39; North Star Freight & # 39; mentioned, offered to pay Glover $ 25 for each package he sent
  • Postal inspectors intercepted a package with an iPad purchased with a stolen credit card that was sent to Glover's home
  • They told him that he would file a complaint if he sent more packages to the company
  • But the scammers told Glover that the FBI were fraudsters trying to steal the packages he was assigned to send & # 39;
  • Glover fell for it and sent four more packages with the label & # 39; toy parts & # 39; with a total of 168 high-capacity magazines for AK-47 & glock pistols
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An Alabama man who posted his resume online managed to send weapons to Russia after he fell for a & # 39; work from home & # 39; scam.

Douglas Glover, 37, from Birmingham has now been imprisoned for 16 months after unknowingly attempting to send articles, including 50 high-capacity AK-47 magazines.

He reported to the federal prison on May 14 after agreeing to plead guilty against a count of an attempted illicit export of firearms in exchange for dropping other federal charges.

The Daily Beast broke the story about the arrest of Glover on Thursday.

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High-capacity magazines for an AK-47 rifle

AK-47 guns

AK-47 guns

Douglas Glover, 37, from Birmingham, Alabama, pleaded guilty in April of an attempted illicit export of firearms and was sentenced to 16 months for sending packages labeled & # 39; toy parts & # 39; which contain a total of 108 high-capacity magazines for AK-47 semi-automatic guns

Glover told the authorities in December 2016 that he started sending illegal goods unintentionally after responding to a job posting on Monster.com

Glover told the authorities in December 2016 that he started sending illegal goods unintentionally after responding to a job posting on Monster.com

Glover told the authorities in December 2016 that he started sending illegal goods unintentionally after responding to a job posting on Monster.com

His ordeal began in December 2016 when the US Postal Service intercepted a package that was sent to Glover's home with an iPad purchased with a stolen credit card.

Postal inspectors went to Glover's house and asked him why he received packages under someone else's name.

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Glover told them he had taken on a job he had seen on Monster.com from a company called North Star Freight.

His boss, who named & # 39; Ginger M. Powers & # 39; ordered him to receive packages before sending them back to a Russian address.

Glover received $ 25 for every package he sent.

The researchers told Glover that he was used as a & # 39; donkey & # 39; in a & # 39; shipping arrangement & # 39 ;.

& # 39; In such arrangements, illegal companies engage in various criminal acts to move fraudulently purchased goods from the United States to foreign countries & # 39 ;, the investigators explained, the court said.

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& # 39; These illegal companies complete this scheme by advertising to hire people to work at home and to receive packages from different couriers. The companies then instruct the "employees" to repackage or re-label the packages and send them to different addresses, often abroad. The illegal companies pay these & # 39; employees & # 39; often for the acceptance, repackaging and return of these packages. & # 39;

Glover accepted a plea in April at the US Northern District Court in Alabama in Birmingham (photo) in exchange for a reduced sentence

Glover accepted a plea in April at the US Northern District Court in Alabama in Birmingham (photo) in exchange for a reduced sentence

Glover accepted a plea in April at the US Northern District Court in Alabama in Birmingham (photo) in exchange for a reduced sentence

The FBI informed Glover that it would no longer send packages and that he would receive federal charges if he did.

The 37-year-old told by email & # 39; Ginger & # 39; about what happened and said that his & # 39; job & # 39; stopped.

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& # 39; I don't like to inform you, but I can no longer receive packages. So I quit this function. Please stop the sending of other packages, ”he wrote, according to the Daily Beast.

But & # 39; Ginger & # 39; responded with a lot of & # 39; urgent & # 39; e-mails and finally Glover convinced that the federal agents with whom he spoke were actually & # 39; fraudsters & # 39; were those & # 39; potentially fake email messages & # 39; sent to steal the packages he was assigned to & # 39 ;.

A week later Glover told the post inspectors, he should talk to his Russian supervisors about the ordeal. In the meantime, he continued sending packages on December 16, 2016, but this time he did not send innocent iPads.

The authorities said that Glover also illegally sent a box with 60 extended clips for glock guns

The authorities said that Glover also illegally sent a box with 60 extended clips for glock guns

The authorities said that Glover also illegally sent a box with 60 extended clips for glock guns

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A post inspector told researchers a high-capacity magazine for an AK-47 military rifle that fell from the bottom of one of Glovers' packages after part of the band had collapsed.

& # 39; Because the tape used to seal the first package had detached itself from the box, the post office could look into the box and find that it seemed to be full of AK-47 sheets without ammunition & # 39; , prosecutors wrote in Glover & # 39; s plea agreement.

A total of 108 AK-47 magazines with a capacity of 30 laps were sent to Glover's address, along with another box with 60 extended clips for Glock pistols and a number of car parts.

The boxes were labeled as & # 39; toy parts & # 39; but federal investigators said that Glover later admitted knowing that the packages actually contained gun parts.

He was interviewed again by post detectives in July 2017 before a complaint was filed four months later.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news (t) birmingham (t) Russia

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