Airplanes can be brought DOWN by a single superheated laptop stored inside a registered bag

A single overheated laptop can shoot down a full commercial airplane. That's according to a new and surprising study by the US government. UU., Which found that a battery fire in checked baggage is enough to dominate an aircraft's firefighting system (stock image)

A single overheated laptop can shoot down a full commercial airplane.

That's according to a shocking new study by the US government. UU., Which found that a battery fire in checked baggage is enough to dominate an aircraft's firefighting system.

A plane could be swiftly engulfed in flames if the fire of a laptop is combined with other flammable materials, such as gas in a deodorant can or cosmetics commonly carried by passengers, experts at the Federal Aviation Administration warned.

The research highlights the dangers of lithium batteries, which are increasingly used to power everything from portable gaming devices to smartphones.

The Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA), the largest pilot union in North America, is currently debating whether it should recommend that battery-powered items, such as laptops or tablets, be banned from baggage stored in the aircraft hold .

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A single overheated laptop can shoot down a full commercial airplane. That's according to a new and surprising study by the US government. UU., Which found that a battery fire in checked baggage is enough to dominate an aircraft's firefighting system (stock image)

A single overheated laptop can shoot down a full commercial airplane. That's according to a new and surprising study by the US government. UU., Which found that a battery fire in checked baggage is enough to dominate an aircraft's firefighting system (stock image)

The FAA study found that the fire-resistant halon gas ejected from the cargo areas of the aircraft in case of fire was not enough to extinguish a lithium battery fire.

While the system prevented the fire from spreading to some nearby flammable materials, such as cardboard, it could not prevent the aerosol cans from exploding.

The tests showed that even when they are bathed in gaseous halon, the cans adjacent to the fire of a laptop are still capable of detonating.

"That could cause a problem that could compromise the aircraft," said Duane Pfund, an official with the US Hazardous Materials and Pipeline Safety Administration. UU., Speaking this week at an air safety forum in Washington.

The study, conducted in June 2017, was discussed on Wednesday at an annual conference led by the Airline Pilots Association (ALPA).

The experts highlighted the increasing risk that lithium batteries represent for flights.

A plane could be swiftly engulfed in flames if the fire of a laptop is combined with other flammable materials, such as gas in a deodorant can or cosmetics commonly carried by passengers, warned the experts of the Federal Aviation Administration. of stock)

A plane could be swiftly engulfed in flames if the fire of a laptop is combined with other flammable materials, such as gas in a deodorant can or cosmetics commonly carried by passengers, warned the experts of the Federal Aviation Administration. of stock)

A plane could be swiftly engulfed in flames if the fire of a laptop is combined with other flammable materials, such as gas in a deodorant can or cosmetics commonly carried by passengers, warned the experts of the Federal Aviation Administration. of stock)

WHY DO SMARTPHONE AND LAPTOP BATTERIES EXPLODE?

Lithium batteries power most modern and portable devices, from smartphones to laptops and portable gaming devices.

The batteries are incredibly safe, but they are known to explode if they are defective or overheated.

Rechargeable batteries store an incredible amount of energy in a small space and are designed to release that power slowly over time.

A defective battery can lose its ability to supply power in a controlled manner, causing it to release this energy all at once, which can cause an explosion.

Defective batteries are generally divided into three categories.

Some, like the infamous Galaxy Note 7 battery, come with a design flaw that means they can not store the load correctly.

Faults can also be detected during normal use, for example, if a device is splashed with water or left exposed to the sun too long.

Counterfeit products are also a common source of battery explosions, as they are designed and built at low cost, often ignoring safety regulations.

"One way or another, we have to deal with these dangers," said Scott Schwartz, director of ALPA's hazardous products program.

Based on the results of the FAA study, the US government UU He supported a call for a United Nations ban on devices larger than a smart phone in checked bags.

The effort ultimately fell short, and the FAA has not imposed new restrictions on what passengers can store in the warehouse, Pfund said.

Lithium batteries are relatively safe, but they are known to explode if they are defective or poorly designed.

In April, a laptop exploded spontaneously and burned parts of an office in Letchworth, Hertfordshire.

The contraption of worker Steve Paffett was lit while he was in charge during the night when he was at home sleeping.

The intrusion alarm on Mr. Paffett's phone, which is connected to a sensor in his office that was shot by fire, woke him up and quickly opened his CCTV application.

The images of the application show Mr. Paffett's desk in flames as the flames spread through the room.

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