AG Merrick Garland ‘breaks pledge to be non-political’ with statement that overturns election laws

Attorney General Merrick Garland has been accused of breaking his promise to be “non-political” by sharing a statement that lifts election laws in Republican-led Georgia as he celebrates the anniversary of the death of civil rights legend Rep. John Lewis honored.

Garland and the Department of Justice have gone after the state of Georgia over its voting law, which it says violates federal law by banning race-based voting.

The Justice Department sued the state in June after Republican Governor Brian Kemp signed a 98-page electoral law in March that made numerous changes to the way elections are administered, including a new requirement for photo ID for voting absentees by post.

Garland and the DOJ have gone after Georgia over its voting laws, which it says violate federal law by banning voting rights based on race

On Saturday, Garland remembered the late Congressman John Lewis, (pictured) whose advocacy led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act, which increased registration of black voters in the US

On Saturday, Garland remembered the late Congressman John Lewis, (pictured) whose advocacy led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act, which increased registration of black voters in the US

Republican supporters say the law is needed to restore confidence in Georgia’s election, while Democrats believe it will limit access to vote, especially for voters of color.

On Saturday, Garland remembered the late Congressman Lewis, whose advocacy led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act, which increased registration of black voters in the US.

In a statement he said since the Supreme Court decision in Shelby County “there has been a dramatic increase across the country in legislative efforts that are making it more difficult for millions of citizens to vote.” This increase accelerated after the 2020 elections,’

“The recent further tightening of voting protection only underscores the need for legislative action,” Garland added. The Department of Justice is using all means to protect the voting rights of all citizens, but that is not enough. We need Congress to pass the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, which would give the Department important tools to protect voting rights and make sure every vote is counted.”

Garland and the Department of Justice have gone after the state of Georgia over its voting law, which it says violates federal law by banning race-based voting.

Garland and the Department of Justice have gone after the state of Georgia over its voting law, which it says violates federal law by banning race-based voting.

His stance appears to contradict previous statements at his hearing when he told Ted Cruz (pictured) that he would keep politics out of the DOJ

His stance appears to contradict previous statements at his hearing when he told Ted Cruz (pictured) that he would keep politics out of the DOJ

This strong stance seems to run counter to Garland’s previous statements.

During his Senate hearing, Garland told Republican Senator Ted Cruz that he would keep politics out of the DOJ, Fox news reported.

“I’m telling you what I think an attorney general should do — look at the facts before making a decision,” Garland told the Texas senator. “I also tell you that in the department I will never make a decision based on politics or partisanship.”

Critics have argued that the DOJ’s recent decision to sue Georgia over its controversial new voting law has “politicized” the ministry and Georgia officials said the lawsuit is “blatantly political” and that the Georgian law actually strengthens security , increases access and improves transparency in elections, Fox reported.

Jonathan Turley, a law professor at George Washington University, told Fox News that the DOJ lawsuit would backfire against the Biden administration and fail in court.

“I am very skeptical and I think they will eventually regret this move. Indeed, it could clarify this issue in a way that the Biden administration doesn’t want,” Turley said.

Turley also pointed out that the provisions in Georgian law differ little from those in many other states, including President Joe Biden’s home state of Delaware, which requires ID to vote in the polls.

‘In my view, this is a very dubious case. Because Georgian law has a lot of overlap with other states like Delaware. For example, voter identification is extremely popular with voters,” he said.

Turley added that the lawsuit could also raise issues with sweeping election laws Democrats are trying to get through Congress, leading to universal mail voting and Election Day registration.

“One of the things that the court can ultimately strengthen is that elections in the constitution are left to the state,” Turley said.

“Alexander Hamilton actually wrote in the Federalist Papers, imagine the federal government would take over the running of the election and he basically said we would all object,” he added.

“Well, that’s what’s happening in Congress right now. They’re essentially trying to federalize the election, and I think they’re going to get some serious backlash on this lawsuit.”

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