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Electric scooters (pictured above) are a source of disagreement in San Francisco.

After kicking back on electric scooters, San Francisco is considering opening a new technology office to regulate experimental new start-up proposals

  • The new office would consider proposals from technical startups
  • Proposed by Norman Yee, who felt that & # 39; companies were just entering and operating & # 39; with little supervision or social responsibility
  • The new office can start as early as January 2020 if it is approved by the city council
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San Francisco has served as an incubator for all sorts of untested technologies.

Airbnb started there in 2008, Uber followed in 2010, and more recently a whole range of electric scooter companies have crammed the city's sidewalks and cycle paths with buzzing two-wheelers.

This week, Norman Yee, president of the Board of Supervisors of San Francisco, introduced a new new idea this week that would give additional control to technology companies wanting to launch experimental and potentially disruptive new pilot programs & # 39; s in the city.

Electric scooters (pictured above) are a source of disagreement in San Francisco.

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Electric scooters (pictured above) are a source of disagreement in San Francisco.

Yee suggested getting one Office of emerging technology as a place for new and experimental technology companies to submit proposals for new projects and negotiate conditions for their implementation without harming the local population.

& # 39; It's almost as if we are co-creating with some of these new technologies, saying: & # 39; This is more beneficial if you went a certain way with your technology than in another way, & Yee told KQED.

Norman Yee (pictured above) is an advocate of public transportation and other community services.

Norman Yee (pictured above) is an advocate of public transportation and other community services.

Norman Yee (pictured above) is an advocate of public transportation and other community services.

WHO ARE THE MAIN E-SCOOTER PLAYERS?

Bird started the craze of the electric scooter in 2017 and spread to 120 cities in the first 14 months

Lime was launched in 2017 and has a current market valuation of $ 1.1 billion

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Uber entered the market for electric scooters by acquiring Jump in 2018

Lyft launched its own brand of electric scooters in 2018

Ford bought Spin for $ 40 million in 2017

The old scooter manufacturer Razor switched to electric scooters in 2018

For Yee, the Office of Emerging Technology could actually reduce & part of the recklessness we saw in the past where companies just came in and operated and didn't ask the city if they needed a permit & # 39 ;.

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If the rest of the council approves the idea of ​​Yee, the office can be opened from January 2020.

In a notorious episode of 2018, many San Francisco residents were upset when they discovered that Lime's electric scooters were designed to send a loud warning message if someone insisted or tried to move them before paying via a smartphone. app.

Aaron Peskin, a San Francisco supervisor, said: “I have received many complaints from residents and retailers who are aware of the noise and intimidation tactics of the police.

& # 39; It is quite ironic that they are thrusting them in the middle of the sidewalk and then these things start to abuse people.

Many people have labeled the scooters, which do not have to be classified as a number of ride-sharing bike programs, a threat and have questioned their legality.

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The start-up culture in the city is inextricably linked to the rapidly rising levels of prosperity in the city.

Earlier this year, real estate agents predicted that the city would become the home of more than 10,000 new millionaires after IPOs of some of the largest technology companies headquartered in the city.

A property developer estimated that within five years the value of a single-family home in the city could rise from an already astronomical $ 3 million to $ 5 million.

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