African Americans believe that politicians care more about white people, the rich and campaign donors

African Americans feel that they are not a priority for American politicians – who could influence the outcome of the 2020 election if candidates recognize and tap into the collective power of the black vote, according to a massive new survey.

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The 2019 Black Census Project questioned more than 31,000 African-Americans about what they think of their politicians and what – and who – they think those legislators really care about.

A majority believe that politicians & # 39; many & # 39; care about rich people (84 percent), big business (82 percent), white people (77 percent) and campaign donors (74 percent).

African Americans do not feel that they are a priority for politicians, while only 4 percent say that legislators & # 39; many & # 39; worries about black people. An additional 35 percent said lawmakers & # 39; a little, & # 39; while more than half (52 percent) said politicians don't care about black people at all.

This graph illustrates how many African-Americans think that politicians worry about different groups. Source: Black Census Project

This graph illustrates how many African-Americans think that politicians worry about different groups. Source: Black Census Project

Immigrants scored even lower, with 58 percent of African Americans saying that politicians don't care about that population at all.

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Similarly, 65 percent of black people do not think that politicians care about the poor at all.

The survey noted that one of the biggest problems was that African-Americans think that politicians consider them all as one, single population, with no nuance derived from different geography, values, socio-economic backgrounds, and other cultural factors.

& # 39; Not everyone is affected in the same way by the problems we all face & # 39 ;, wrote Alicia Garza, who created the Black Census Project in 2018, in a New York Times opinion piece. & # 39; For example, the need for adequate healthcare is increasing the urgency of black people in Alabama, where Republican lawmakers are blocking the expansion of Medicaid. & # 39;

This graph illustrates the proportion of African-Americans with favorable versus unfavorable views of every major political party, with a significant preference for Democrats over Republicans. Source: Black Census Project

This graph illustrates the proportion of African-Americans with favorable versus unfavorable views of every major political party, with a significant preference for Democrats over Republicans. Source: Black Census Project

This graph illustrates the proportion of African-Americans with favorable versus unfavorable views of every major political party, with a significant preference for Democrats over Republicans. Source: Black Census Project

Despite the fact that nobody had the feeling, nearly three of the four respondents said they had voted in the 2016 presidential election – and 40 percent helped register voters, drove people to the polls, or were otherwise politically engaged.

Moreover, the rise of African-Americans in the 2018 mid-term elections increased by nearly 11 percentage points compared to the 2014 mid-term periods.

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While the 2019 research report entitled & # 39; More Black than Blue & # 39; is, the survey shows a preference among African-Americans for the Democratic Party.

About 62 percent of black people see the Democratic Party favorably (20 percent thought it was negative), while only 6 percent had positive feelings about the Republican Party.

Nevertheless, almost a quarter of African-Americans consider themselves independent.

In addition, the study suggests that black women will play an important role in deciding on the next president, with women making up nearly 60 percent of those surveyed and nearly half of those living in the south.

When it comes to what African Americans want from their politicians, the answer was overwhelmingly an increase in wages (85 percent), coupled with lower healthcare costs (77 percent), university (77 percent) and housing (76 percent).

This graph illustrates how many African-Americans say they trust different institutions and people. Source: Black Census Project
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This graph illustrates how many African-Americans say they trust different institutions and people. Source: Black Census Project

This graph illustrates how many African-Americans say they trust different institutions and people. Source: Black Census Project

A majority (71 percent) supports raising the minimum wage to $ 15 per hour, and 76 percent are in favor of making college affordable for anyone who wants to participate.

Black Americans also see a greater role in the government in providing a socio-economic safety net for the most vulnerable: 87 percent believe that the government should provide adequate housing for people who do not have access to it; 90 percent think the government should provide affordable health care to all Americans; and 86 percent think the government should work to close the gap between rich and poor.

More than three-quarters of African Americans prefer to pay for those changes with an increase in taxes for people who earn $ 250,000 or more – including 55 percent who & # 39; strong & # 39; be in favor of such a policy change.

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In addition, 58 percent of black Americans are against corporate tax cuts – with the main opposition coming from high-income respondents: 76 percent of respondents in the survey with incomes in excess of $ 100,000 are opposed to reducing corporate taxes.

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