Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Adam Goodes condemns Scott Morrison for saying that there has never been slavery in Australia

Adam Goodes satirizes Scott Morrison for saying there was never slavery in Australia and that the AFL’s ‘toxic environment’ took such a heavy toll on his mental health that he had to stop

  • AFL star Adam Goodes hit back at Scott Morrison for false claims of slavery
  • The prime minister said on the radio last month that there was no slavery in Australia
  • The prominent Aboriginal athlete gave a candid interview on the BBC’s HARDtalk
  • Goodes also talks about the “toxic” culture that forced him out of the AFL

AFL star Adam Goodes was slapped at Scott Morrison for alleging that Australia had never been enslaved and opened up about the ‘toxic environment’ that forced him out of the game.

The Sydney Swans major walked away from the sport at the peak of his career in 2015, after being constantly booed by fans for over a year.

In a candid interview with the BBC’s HARDtalk program, Goodes revealed that he chose to retire because his treatment put a strain on his mental health.

Scroll down for video.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison (pictured) falsely claimed that Australia never had slavery in a radio interview last month

AFL superstar Adam Goodes (pictured) beat Scott Morrison (left) for claiming Australia never had slavery

AFL superstar Adam Goodes (pictured) beat Scott Morrison (left) for claiming Australia never had slavery

AFL superstar Adam Goodes (right) beat Scott Morrison (left) for claiming Australia had never been slavery

“I had to get out of this toxic environment that had previously been a safe place for me to just be an incredible player that I wanted to be and to be the leader I was,” Goodes said.

“But here I had the choice of submitting to or distancing myself from this toxic environment and really reassessing my priorities.”

The drama started when the two-time Brownlow medalist asked security to remove a child from the stadium in a game that had racially abused him.

From then on, opposition fans mercilessly objected to Goodes.

Adam Goodes is pictured with wife Natalie Crocker when they arrive at the 2019 GQ Men of The Year Awards

Adam Goodes is pictured with wife Natalie Crocker when they arrive at the 2019 GQ Men of The Year Awards

Adam Goodes is pictured with wife Natalie Crocker when they arrive at the 2019 GQ Men of The Year Awards

Goodes is shown asking security to remove a child from the stadium in a game that has racially abused him

Goodes is shown asking security to remove a child from the stadium in a game that has racially abused him

Goodes is shown asking security to remove a child from the stadium in a game that has racially abused him

The controversy over the boo is now the subject of an award-winning Stan Grant documentary entitled The Australian Dream, and has gained international acclaim after George Floyd’s death in the United States and the worldwide rise of the Black Lives Matter movement.

Five years after the traumatic ordeal and now 40 years old, Goodes said more and more people in Australia and around the world are “waking up to racism, especially casual racism.”

But when asked about Mr. Morrion’s false claim last month that “there was no slavery in Australia,” Goodes took a veiled swipe at the prime minister and other politicians.

“I don’t know if they listen or not,” said Australian of the year 2014.

“There are other things in our country that they think need more attention.

“We are 2.8 percent of the population here in Australia, so not much time and effort is put into working with us as indigenous peoples.

“And when I say” work with “us, it’s to listen to us, follow our advice and create good governance and policies behind it.”

This shocking black and white photo shows how indigenous people in 19th century Australia were treated

This shocking black and white photo shows how indigenous people in 19th century Australia were treated

This shocking black and white photo shows how indigenous people in 19th century Australia were treated

Groups of Aboriginal men and boys are chained together, standing or sitting, with only a cloth around their waist, while white police officers and 'Aboriginal trackers' are standing next to them with four guns

Groups of Aboriginal men and boys are chained together, standing or sitting, with only a cloth around their waist, while white police officers and 'Aboriginal trackers' are standing next to them with four guns

Groups of Aboriginal men and boys are chained together, standing or sitting, with only a cloth around their waist, while white police officers and ‘Aboriginal trackers’ are standing next to them with four guns

Goodes said he was keen to work with the Australian government to help them achieve their KPIs when it comes to indigenous results, but urged Aboriginals not to “wait” for better leadership.

“I don’t have time to wait for them and the indigenous people don’t have time to wait for the government to do this right,” he said.

“So we work with companies here in Australia who understand, who see the value here in Australia of working with indigenous people, be it education, work or philanthropic work.”

Goodes is pictured at the Caulfield Cup horse race in Melbourne, 2018 wearing a white jacket

Goodes is pictured at the Caulfield Cup horse race in Melbourne, 2018 wearing a white jacket

Goodes is pictured at the Caulfield Cup horse race in Melbourne, 2018 wearing a white jacket

A cyclist rides past a giant mural by Adam Goodes, one of Australia's most talked-about indigenous athletes, in Sydney 2020

A cyclist rides past a giant mural by Adam Goodes, one of Australia's most talked-about indigenous athletes, in Sydney 2020

A cyclist rides past a giant mural by Adam Goodes, one of Australia’s most talked-about indigenous athletes, in Sydney 2020

Advertisement

.