Actors advocate that movies DO NOT use digital body doubles to make sex scenes more explicit

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Stars like Naomie Harris and Ruth Wilson have backed the call not to use digital body doubles in movies and TV shows to make sex scenes even more explicit than actors originally agreed.

New industry guidelines, drawn up by Time is up campaign group, have included additional rules about using CGI nudity to make sure actors feel comfortable filming intimate scenes.

The recommendations, also backed by the BFI (British Film Institute), also encourage performers to negotiate a contract called a simulated sex rider, or a nude ‘rider’ that emphasizes in writing what they do and don’t want to do during sex scenes.

Support: Stars, including Naomie Harris and Ruth Wilson, have backed the call not to use digital body doubles in movies and TV shows to make sex scenes even more explicit than actors originally agreed

Support: Stars, including Naomie Harris and Ruth Wilson, have backed the call not to use digital body doubles in movies and TV shows to make sex scenes even more explicit than actors originally agreed

Regarding the use of body doubles while filming intimate moments in a movie or TV show, the Time’s Up group has suggested restrictions on the use of both real and virtual doubles.

The guidelines state that an actor can ‘negotiate’ to give his ‘approval’ of a body double if one is used for the scene.

It adds, ‘The nudity, simulated sexual content and agreed upon choreography of the intimate scene portrayed by duplication will be limited to what was originally agreed upon by the actor. This applies to digital or body doubling. ‘

Skyfall star Naomie, 44, supported Time’s Up’s guidelines, saying, ‘I am absolutely delighted with these guides created by my sisters at Time’s Up. They show that regardless of your situation, you have options. These guides help arm people with the resources and information needed to determine the best way forward. ‘

Guidelines: New industry guidelines, drawn up by the Time's Up campaign group, include additional rules about using CGI nudity to ensure actors feel comfortable filming intimate scenes (photo Paul Mescal and Daisy Edgar-Jones in Normal people)

Guidelines: New industry guidelines, drawn up by the Time's Up campaign group, include additional rules about using CGI nudity to ensure actors feel comfortable filming intimate scenes (photo Paul Mescal and Daisy Edgar-Jones in Normal people)

Guidelines: New industry guidelines, drawn up by the Time’s Up campaign group, include additional rules about using CGI nudity to ensure actors feel comfortable filming intimate scenes (photo Paul Mescal and Daisy Edgar-Jones in Normal people)

While Dark River actress Ruth Wilson agreed, 39, agreed: “ Our industry is a really great one, but one that has existed without the necessary safeguards.

Whatever the experience, whether you’re negotiating a sex scene for the first time or witnessing abusive behavior on set, these guidelines come as an essential resource. Everyone deserves to feel safe at work, and that’s a huge step to make that happen. ‘

The advisory further states that CGI technology should not be used to ‘sex-up’ without the consent of the actors involved, noting: ‘No computer-generated imagery, prosthetics or digitization of your image or body related to the nude and simulated sex scenes may be performed without your written permission. ‘

Agreement: The recommendations, backed by Ruth Wilson (pictured), also encourage performers to negotiate a contract called a simulated sex rider, or a nude 'rider' that emphasizes in writing what they're willing to do during sex scenes.

Agreement: The recommendations, backed by Ruth Wilson (pictured), also encourage performers to negotiate a contract called a simulated sex rider, or a nude 'rider' that emphasizes in writing what they're willing to do during sex scenes.

Agreement: The recommendations, backed by Ruth Wilson (pictured), also encourage performers to negotiate a contract called a simulated sex rider, or a nude ‘rider’ that emphasizes in writing what they’re willing to do during sex scenes.

Limit: Regarding the use of body doubles while filming intimate moments in a movie or TV show, the Time's Up group has suggested restrictions on the use of both real and virtual doubles (pictured, a Bridgerton sex scene from Netflix)

Limit: Regarding the use of body doubles while filming intimate moments in a movie or TV show, the Time's Up group has suggested restrictions on the use of both real and virtual doubles (pictured, a Bridgerton sex scene from Netflix)

Limit: Regarding the use of body doubles while filming intimate moments in a movie or TV show, the Time’s Up group has suggested restrictions on the use of both real and virtual doubles (pictured, a Bridgerton sex scene from Netflix)

It emphasizes that performers must give their prior consent to the use of ‘digital duplication or digitization’, including CGI used to superimpose one performer’s body parts on another.

In terms of the nudist, Time’s Up’s guidelines suggest that contracts should specify levels of nudity and specific acts that the actor is willing to do.

These details could include things like closed-mouth kissing or nudity just above the waist.

Time’s Up UK chairwoman Dame Heather Rabbatts said: “The entertainment industry is not a typical workplace, so it can be confusing to find out your rights and options around workplace harassment, discrimination and misconduct.

Rules: 'The nudity, simulated sexual content and agreed upon choreography of the intimate scene portrayed by duplication will be limited to what was originally agreed upon by the actor.  This applies to digital or body doubling '(pictured, an intimate moment in Amazon Prime's Ammonite)

Rules: 'The nudity, simulated sexual content and agreed upon choreography of the intimate scene portrayed by duplication will be limited to what was originally agreed upon by the actor.  This applies to digital or body doubling '(pictured, an intimate moment in Amazon Prime's Ammonite)

Rules: ‘The nudity, simulated sexual content and agreed upon choreography of the intimate scene portrayed by duplication will be limited to what was originally agreed upon by the actor. This applies to digital or body doubling ‘(pictured, an intimate moment in Amazon Prime’s Ammonite)

“We developed these tools with our sisters in the US, for people in the entertainment industry who find themselves in situations that are at best uncomfortable or at worst dangerous.”

The newly published guidelines would try to keep up with advancements in special effects used in the Hollywood film industry, where the actors’ figures were realistically reproduced on screen.

Examples include Lena Headey’s Game Of Thrones character Cersei Lannister walking naked through a town in series five, in which Lena wasn’t naked at all.

Making Her Say: Naomie Said: These guides help arm people with the resources and information needed to determine the best way forward '(pictured in 2019)

Making Her Say: Naomie Said: These guides help arm people with the resources and information needed to determine the best way forward '(pictured in 2019)

Making Her Say: Naomie Said: These guides help arm people with the resources and information needed to determine the best way forward ‘(pictured in 2019)

Instead, a naked body double was mixed with her clothed body in post-production, giving the illusion that the actress had, in fact, undressed for the scene.

While in the 2010 movie Machete, star Jessica Alba’s underwear was digitally removed, making it look like she was naked.

The Time’s Up organization was created to combat workplace sexual harassment in the wake of the #MeToo movement, which emerged in the wake of the Harvey Weinstein scandal in 2017.

Advice: Advice further states that CGI technology should not be used for 'sexing' without the consent of the actors involved (photo, a sex scene from BBC's Normal People)

Advice: Advice further states that CGI technology should not be used for 'sexing' without the consent of the actors involved (photo, a sex scene from BBC's Normal People)

Advice: Advice further states that CGI technology should not be used for ‘sexing’ without the consent of the actors involved (photo, a sex scene from BBC’s Normal People)