According to the survey, almost two-thirds of older Americans have seen age discrimination in the workplace

Most older American workers say that age discrimination is something or very common

According to a new national survey, almost two-thirds of US workers aged 45 and older say they have been exposed to age discrimination at work.

Sixty-one percent reported having experienced or witnessed such prejudice, and 59 percent strongly believed that legislators should strengthen the age discrimination laws of the United States, according to the AARP survey of 3,900 older Americans who are employed or looking for a job.

Approximately a quarter of respondents said that discrimination was manifested through negative comments about a person's age or supervisor, and 16 percent reported being overlooked by a job because of their age.

"They feel very undervalued," said Susan Weinstock, vice president of AARP, in an interview with DailyMail.com. "What we hear from people is:" I have worked a whole life, I have a lot of experience and valuable resources, but they do not hire me because of my age ".

Most older American workers say that age discrimination is something or very common

Most older American workers say that age discrimination is something or very common

Only 3 percent of respondents have formally complained about age discrimination, which according to authorities could indicate that the problem is more widespread than previously believed.

Despite the frequency of this type of behavior, more Americans are working later in their lives or even returning to work after formally retiring. By 2022, almost 35 percent of the nation's workforce will be 50 or older, according to the report.

"The notion of retirement is changing," said Kathleen Christensen, director of the Sloan Foundation's Working Longer program. & # 39; Now there are all kinds of variations. Some older workers may be doing it to earn survival income, while others work to pay for travel and vacations. "

While many (42 percent) older Americans continue to work in their golden years for financial reasons, they still want to get a sense of satisfaction and respect for their careers, the survey found. Staying mentally active was a factor for 91 percent of older workers who decided to stay at their jobs.

"Older workers are of great value to employers," said Weinstock. "Employers look for people with soft skills, such as being good at teamwork or collaboration or being able to write well, these are skills that older workers have developed through their years of experience."

Other reasons why they tried to continue working include: the need to support family members (12 percent); you need to save for retirement (10 percent) and have extra money to buy what you want (87 percent).

Not being hired because of his age was the most common form of age discrimination in the workplace reported by older Americans

Not being hired because of his age was the most common form of age discrimination in the workplace reported by older Americans

Not being hired because of his age was the most common form of age discrimination in the workplace reported by older Americans

And 27 percent of older workers said they never expected to leave the work force altogether.

Older Americans also tend to stay in a job for a long time, and more than a third say they have been in the same company for more than 15 years.

Only 4 percent of older workers said it was likely. they would lose their job next year, while 14 percent said something likely, 42 percent said it was not very likely, and 40 percent said it was not likely.

If they lost their current job, 38 percent of employed workers said they were confident they could find another one within three months, while 25 percent were very safe.

Among those who were not optimistic about their job prospects, 45 percent attributed that sentiment to age discrimination.

(function() {
var _fbq = window._fbq || (window._fbq = []);
if (!_fbq.loaded) {
var fbds = document.createElement(‘script’);
fbds.async = true;
fbds.src = “http://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbds.js”;
var s = document.getElementsByTagName(‘script’)[0];
s.parentNode.insertBefore(fbds, s);
_fbq.loaded = true;
}
_fbq.push([‘addPixelId’, ‘1401367413466420’]);
})();
window._fbq = window._fbq || [];
window._fbq.push([“track”, “PixelInitialized”, {}]);
.