<pre><pre>Aboriginals had no problems with tourists climbing Uluru

The oldest Aboriginal keeper of Uluru believed that as tourists & # 39; stupid enough & # 39; to climb the giant red rock, they should be able to do this.

Paddy Uluru once said that climbing the monolith previously known as Ayers Rock & # 39; no cultural interest & # 39; had for his people.

The local Anangu parent believed there was simply no practical reason to climb Uluru because it was not good for hunting or gathering food.

& # 39; If tourists are stupid enough to climb the rock, they are welcome & # 39 ;, he says.

Uluru told a reporter that it was the secret story of the rock that was sacred, rather than the actual sandstone formation 335 kilometers southwest of Alice Springs.

Footage made as early as 1946 shows two initiate Anangu men scaling the orientation on the Northern Territory as tour guides and splashing around in rock pools.

Scroll down for video

The oldest Aboriginal keeper of Uluru believed that as tourists & # 39; stupid enough & # 39; were to climb the rock, they should be able to. Paddy Uluru, a local Anangu elder, said that climbing the monolith previously known as Ayers Rock & # 39; of no cultural interest & # 39; was for his people

Tiger Tjalkalyirri and fellow Anangu male guide Mitjenkeri Mick on top of the rock in 1946

Tiger Tjalkalyirri and fellow Anangu male guide Mitjenkeri Mick on top of the rock in 1946

Tiger Tjalkalyirri and fellow Anangu male guide Mitjenkeri Mick on top of the rock in 1946

The traditional owners of the Anangu have asked tourists not to climb on the rock for years and the board of the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park announced in 2017 that climbing Uluru will be prohibited from October 26. Many tourists climb the rock, which means that they show no respect for the Aboriginals

The traditional owners of the Anangu have asked tourists not to climb on the rock for years and the board of the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park announced in 2017 that climbing Uluru will be prohibited from October 26. Many tourists climb the rock, which means that they show no respect for the Aboriginals

The traditional owners of the Anangu have asked tourists not to climb on the rock for years and the board of the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park announced in 2017 that climbing Uluru will be prohibited from October 26. Many tourists climb the rock, which means that they show no respect for the Aboriginals

poll

SHOULD TOURISTS CLIMB ULTRU?

As a ban on climbing the Uluru approaches, thousands of tourists are in a hurry to make the controversial journey to the top of the rock.

The traditional owners of the Anangu have asked tourists not to climb on the rock for years and the board of the Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park announced in 2017 that the scaling of Uluru is prohibited from October 26.

The board and Parks Australia said that climbing had to be stopped for cultural and safety reasons.

The 800-meter journey to the top, aided by a chain handle, installed in 1964 and extended in 1976, takes about an hour.

Since the 1940s, more than 35 people have died climbing the rock and rescues are risky and expensive.

But there is evidence that the general Aboriginal objection to rock climbing is relatively recent.

Geologist and writer Marc Hendrickx has been campaigning for years for the right to climb the monolith.

As a ban on climbing the Uluru approaches, thousands of tourists are in a hurry to make the controversial journey to the top of the rock. Aboriginal people have wanted the ban for years

As a ban on climbing the Uluru approaches, thousands of tourists are in a hurry to make the controversial journey to the top of the rock. Aboriginal people have wanted the ban for years

As a ban on climbing the Uluru approaches, thousands of tourists are in a hurry to make the controversial journey to the top of the rock. Aboriginal people have wanted the ban for years

& # 39; Under supervision, the reasons for the closure cannot be substantiated & # 39 ;, he wrote Quadrant last year.

& # 39; In 1973, as part of land rights negotiations, the federal government recognized Paddy Uluru as the legitimate, main owner of Uluru.

& # 39; Paddy Uluru was a fully initiated Anangu man who was familiar with all local laws and customs.

& # 39; His views on tourists climbing the Rock were summarized in an interview with Erwin Chlanda of the Alice Springs News. & # 39;

Paddy Uluru quoted: & # 39; If tourists are stupid enough to climb the rock, they are welcome & # 39; and & # 39; the physical climb was not a cultural concern & # 39 ;.

Tiger Tjalkalyirri and Mitjenkeri Mick accompanied the white Cliff Thompson to climb Uluru

Tiger Tjalkalyirri and Mitjenkeri Mick accompanied the white Cliff Thompson to climb Uluru

Tiger Tjalkalyirri and Mitjenkeri Mick accompanied the white Cliff Thompson to climb Uluru

Two unnamed Aboriginal men stand near the cairn at the top of Uluru in 1947, when Ayers Rock

Two unnamed Aboriginal men stand near the cairn at the top of Uluru in 1947, when Ayers Rock

Two unnamed Aboriginal men stand near the cairn at the top of Uluru in 1947, when Ayers Rock

Chlanda has repeatedly written about his conversation with Paddy Uluru, which took place next to the rock in the 1970s.

& # 39; He said words to the effect: "If you are stupid enough to climb it, go for it."

Badges with the title & # 39; I Climbed Ayers Rock & # 39; were once popular souvenirs for tourists

Badges with the title & # 39; I Climbed Ayers Rock & # 39; were once popular souvenirs for tourists

Badges with the title & # 39; I Climbed Ayers Rock & # 39; were once popular souvenirs for tourists

& # 39; He certainly wouldn't. He said there is not much water up there; almost no plants and no game.

& # 39; But he would never tell me the full story about The Rock … It's the story that is sacred and secret, not the shape of the land. & # 39;

Mr. Hendrickx wrote that there was other evidence that Paddy Uluru had no problems climbing the rock and that he had done this himself.

& # 39; Paddy Uluru & # 39; s feelings toward the climb were also documented by Derek Roff, the park ranger between 1968 and 1985 and close friend of Paddy & # 39 ;, he wrote.

& # 39; In interviews for an Oral History project in the Northern Area in 1997, Roff stated that the problem of climbing by tourists has never arisen and has told Paddy Uluru that he himself would climb the Rock. & # 39;

Senior Anangu-man and another traditional rock owner, Tiger Tjalkalyirri, acted as an early guide and climbing partner for visitors and his name appeared on a log at the top.

Ayers Rock guides and Anangu men Tiger Tjalkalyirri and Mitjenkeri Mick splash around in rock pools as they guide two white men to climb to what is now known as Uluru in 1946

Ayers Rock guides and Anangu men Tiger Tjalkalyirri and Mitjenkeri Mick splash around in rock pools as they guide two white men to climb to what is now known as Uluru in 1946

Ayers Rock guides and Anangu men Tiger Tjalkalyirri and Mitjenkeri Mick splash around in rock pools as they guide two white men to climb to what is now known as Uluru in 1946

Paddy Uluru & # 39; s grandson Sammy Wilson welcomed the climbing ban when it was announced in 2017. & # 39; It is an extremely important place, not a playground or theme park like Disneyland & # 39;

Paddy Uluru & # 39; s grandson Sammy Wilson welcomed the climbing ban when it was announced in 2017. & # 39; It is an extremely important place, not a playground or theme park like Disneyland & # 39;

Paddy Uluru & # 39; s grandson Sammy Wilson welcomed the climbing ban when it was announced in 2017. & # 39; It is an extremely important place, not a playground or theme park like Disneyland & # 39;

There are images of Tiger Tjalkalyirri and fellow Anangu-man Mitjenkeri Mick on the top of the rock in 1946.

& # 39; It is clear that current claims that & # 39; Anangu will never climb & # 39; be incorrect and that the very sacred nature of the climbing route is a very recent invention & # 39 ;, Hendrickx wrote.

& # 39; The cultural heritage interest of the climb to both Anangu and millions of non-Aboriginal visitors is something that deserves to be celebrated and maintained, not discouraged or prohibited. & # 39;

Paddy Uluru died in 1979.

His grandson Sammy Wilson, now the president of the Central Land Council, welcomed the climbing ban when it was announced two years ago.

& # 39; It's a very important place, not a playground or theme park like Disneyland, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; We want you to come, hear us and learn. We have been thinking about this for a long time. & # 39;

WHY did ABORIGINAL TEACHERS ask for a prohibition on KLURMEN ULURU?

In November 2017, it was announced that climbing Uluru, considered a holy place by the local Anangu population, would be prohibited from October 26, 2019.

The management of Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park, consisting of a majority of the original Aboriginal owners, unanimously decided to close the climb.

The traditional owner and CEO Sammy Wilson said on behalf of the Anangu people that it was time to do that.

& # 39; We've been talking about it for so long and now we can finish the climb & # 39 ;, Wilson said. & # 39; It's about protection by combining two systems, the government and Anangu.

& # 39; This decision is for both Anangu and non-Anangu to be proud of together; to realize, it is of course the right thing to close it.

& # 39; The country has law and culture. We welcome tourists here. Closing the climb is not something to feel angry about, but a reason to celebrate. Let's come together, let's close it together.

& # 39; If I travel to another country and there is a holy place, an area with limited access, I do not enter or climb to it, I respect it. It is the same here for Anangu. We welcome tourists here. We do not stop tourism, only this activity. & # 39;

Uluru and Kata Tjuta – formerly known as the Olgas – were returned to the Anangu people on October 26, 1985.

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail