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Bruce Shillingsworth (photo), a man from Muruwari and Budjiti, was invited to speak about the impact of the paralyzing drought of Australia on the indigenous community during Monday night's segment.

& # 39; We need to wake up! & # 39; Aboriginal activist unleashes a furious anger while selling water for profit as & # 39; a second wave of genocide & # 39; during the debate about the drought in Australia

  • Bruce Shillingsworth was invited to speak during the Q&A drought segment
  • He threw & # 39; business desire & # 39; because he took water from indigenous communities
  • Mr. Shillingsworth said the lack of water affected the health of the community
  • The activist was praised by the Q&A audience and by viewers on Twitter
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An indigenous activist says water is being stolen from the First Nation population in what he described as a & # 39; second wave of genocide & # 39; during a furious debate about the drought in Australia on questions and answers.

Bruce Shillingsworth, a man from Muruwari and Budjiti, was invited to speak about the impact of the paralyzing drought of Australia on the indigenous community during Monday night's segment.

Mr. Shillingsworth – a self-proclaimed water warrior – said he spoke on behalf of drought-stricken indigenous communities left voiceless.

& # 39; Water mismanagement and the corruption and greed of companies and capitalism in this country have killed our rivers & # 39 ;, he said.

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Bruce Shillingsworth (photo), a man from Muruwari and Budjiti, was invited to speak about the impact of the paralyzing drought of Australia on the indigenous community during Monday night's segment.

Bruce Shillingsworth (photo), a man from Muruwari and Budjiti, was invited to speak about the impact of the paralyzing drought of Australia on the indigenous community during Monday night's segment.

Mr. Shillingsworth then received & # 39; hear, hear & # 39; and loud blows before continuing his speech.

& # 39; They have killed our communities … health has deteriorated in our communities, our old people are dying now, our young people with a higher level of mental health, suicide, dialysis, & # 39; he said.

& # 39; Many people from the First Nation are leaving their tribe, their country where they have lived for thousands of years. & # 39;

Mr. Shillingsworth referred to the declining population of aquatic life and suggested that the problems were too far away.

& # 39; How do we return the 50-year-old cod, how do we bring back the freshwater mussels and aquatic life, the ecosystem and the animals that were dependent on the river and the water? & # 39; he said.

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& # 39; They are completely dead now. They are extinct. & # 39;

Mr. Shillingsworth - a self-proclaimed water warrior - said he spoke on behalf of indigenous communities affected by drought without voice

Mr. Shillingsworth - a self-proclaimed water warrior - said he spoke on behalf of indigenous communities affected by drought without voice

Mr. Shillingsworth – a self-proclaimed water warrior – said he spoke on behalf of indigenous communities affected by drought without voice

Mr. Shillingsworth said that this has happened in the last century and & # 39; Australia must wake up & # 39 ;.

When he listened to the panel, Mr. Shillingsworth said he heard two things; water and profit.

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& # 39; Why do we sell water to make a profit? "My people who had been dependent on animals for thousands of years and are now dying," he said.

& # 39; This is the second wave of genocide. It happens in my community. & # 39;

Mr. Shillingsworth concluded that he wanted to speak for his community who & # 39; had no vote in the last 230 years & # 39 ;.

& # 39; Why do our people die young? Why do our people suffer? Because of the greed. Taking our water. Where are our rights to water? First nation rights on water? & # 39; he said.

The activist & # 39; Water for Rivers & # 39 ;, who is also a painter, received applause from the public

The activist & # 39; Water for Rivers & # 39 ;, who is also a painter, received applause from the public

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The activist & # 39; Water for Rivers & # 39 ;, who is also a painter, received applause from the public

The activist was praised for his moving speech on Twitter

The activist was praised for his moving speech on Twitter

The activist was praised for his moving speech on Twitter

Mr. Shillingsworth urged leaders to return water to rivers for both indigenous communities and the environment.

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The activist & # 39; Water for Rivers & # 39 ;, who is also a painter, received even more blows from the audience.

Mr. Shillingsworth's family is & # 39; painters, dancers, and rain makers & # 39; and he is a cultural educator in Sydney.

He launched the Corroboree project this year, where dance groups from the river communities and around Australia performed riverbed corroborees in the evening.

The activist was praised for his moving speech on Twitter.

Mike Cannon-Brookes, CEO of software company Atlassian, tweeted: & Bruce Shillingsworth you are a fantastic legend champion! Fire up. I understand your pain. Your passion. We all did that. Thanks for the blunt emotion. & # 39;

Another viewer said: & # 39; Bruce spoke TRUTH to Power tonight. He said it the way it is. He is right, there is no room for profit above water. It is the fault of capitalism. & # 39;

Mike Cannon-Brookes, CEO of software company Atlassian, tweeted: "Bruce Shillingsworth you are a fantastic legend champion!

Mike Cannon-Brookes, CEO of software company Atlassian, tweeted: "Bruce Shillingsworth you are a fantastic legend champion!

Mike Cannon-Brookes, CEO of software company Atlassian, tweeted: & Bruce Shillingsworth you are a fantastic legend champion!

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