Home Entertainment ABC under fire after one of the network’s biggest shows received a staggering 2,100 complaints.

ABC under fire after one of the network’s biggest shows received a staggering 2,100 complaints.

by Merry
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ABC's flagship current affairs program Q+A received a staggering 2,100 complaints from viewers last year. Ombudsman Fiona Cameron said most of the issues raised by fans focused on the show's coverage of the war in Gaza. In the photo: current presenter Patricia Karvalas

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ABC’s flagship current affairs program Q+A received a staggering 2,100 complaints from viewers last year.

Ombudsman Fiona Cameron said most of the issues raised by fans focused on the show’s coverage of the war in Gaza.

Industry Blog TV tonight reports that the complaints appear to have been a targeted campaign accusing Q+A of being “pro-Israel” and alleging Islamophobia and racism.

Of the complaints made against Q+A, 1,974 arose from a single episode.

The complaints accused the show of lacking impartiality and creating “harm and offence” over the way it handled discussion of the Gaza conflict.

ABC's flagship current affairs program Q+A received a staggering 2,100 complaints from viewers last year. Ombudsman Fiona Cameron said most of the issues raised by fans focused on the show's coverage of the war in Gaza. In the photo: current presenter Patricia Karvalas

ABC’s flagship current affairs program Q+A received a staggering 2,100 complaints from viewers last year. Ombudsman Fiona Cameron said most of the issues raised by fans focused on the show’s coverage of the war in Gaza. In the photo: current presenter Patricia Karvalas

According to the report, many of the complaints were “worded identically.” Meanwhile, TV Tonight reports that people were urged to contact ABC and advised how to “file a complaint.”

Cameron later commented that, overall, the ABC’s coverage of the war in Gaza was “professional, wide-ranging and reflected newsworthy events,” the publication reported.

It comes after Q+A managed to escape the ax last year, despite falling ratings.

Industry blog TV Tonight reports that the complaints appear to have been a targeted campaign accusing Q+A of being “pro-Israel” and alleging Islamophobia and racism stemming from comments made by a panelist on the show.

The once-hit show returned this year with a shortened season of just 24 episodes, instead of 40.

A staff email leaked to the Financial Review in December revealed the national broadcaster’s intention to air the controversial talk show in four six-week slots.

National Radio presenter Patricia Karvalas was announced as host of the new season which began on Monday, February 19.

The program will go on hiatus after March 25, before returning for three more six-week slots: April 29 to June 3, then August 12 to September 16, and finally October 21 to November 25.

According to the report, many of the complaints were “worded identically.” Meanwhile, TV Tonight reports that people were urged to contact ABC and advised how to “file a complaint.” Pictured: Former Q&A Stan Grant

Karvelas will take over the top job after a tumultuous year for the show, which included the resignation of Stan Grant and a drop in ratings.

Once considered the one that set the news agenda with its hard-hitting discussions of current affairs, over the past two years the show has struggled to stay afloat amid a revolving door of hosts and changing schedules.

A 2023 episode garnered 194,000 viewers in the top five cities, according to OzTam’s overnight ratings.

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