ABC TV show Bluey is under attack for not having “ disabled, queer, or single-parent families. ”

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The popular children’s cartoon series Bluey has been attacked for lacking disabled, queer, poor or ‘gender diverse’ characters.

Journalist Beverley Wang condemned the ABC’s lack of diversity in a piece for the national broadcaster Every day website, where she opened up about her ‘struggles’ with the Emmy award-winning show.

She asked why Brisbane-based Bluey was not ‘more representative’ of the city in which it is based, while acknowledging that her comments ‘may ask too much of a show already so tender, nuanced and upbeat’.

“ Where are disabled, gay, poor, gender-diverse dogs, dogs of color and one-parent families in Brisbane in Bluey? ” Wrote Ms. Wang, describing herself on her Twitter profile as an “ Asian female broadcaster. ”

Hit children’s animated series Bluey has come under fire for lack of diversity, with a journalist asking why the ABC program didn’t feature characters who were disabled or strange

Journalist Beverley Wang (pictured) wrote a piece for ABC's Everyday Life website where she asked, 'Where are the handicapped, gay, poor, gender diversity, dogs of color and one-parent families in Brisbane in Bluey'

Journalist Beverley Wang (pictured) wrote a piece for ABC’s Everyday Life website where she asked, ‘Where are the handicapped, gay, poor, gender diversity, dogs of color and one-parent families in Brisbane in Bluey’

If they’re in the background, let them come forward. (Maynard, voiced by Sean Choolburra, I’m looking at you.) ‘

Mr Choolburra is a Girramay, Kalkadoon, Pitta Pitta and Gugu Yalanji man who portrays Maynard’s character, who is described as having a ‘minor role’ on the series.

Ms. Wang said that as a parent of color, she was “aware of the presence – or absence – of diverse representations in pop culture of children.

“We live in a world where most of the main characters on children’s television are white; where more animals than people with colored protagonists populate the pages of children’s books, ‘she said.

Poll

Is Bluey diverse enough?

  • Yes 492 votes
  • No 12 votes

Dubbed Australia’s most popular children’s television show, Bluey follows the adventures of “ a sweet, inexhaustible six-year-old Blue Heeler dog ” along with her family, including her mom, dad, and younger sister, and her friends.

Responding to criticism of her comments on Twitter, Ms. Wang said she wrote the piece, “I learned a lot from Bluey, but could the show be more representative?” – because she believed the show could do better with the choice of character.

This piece is essentially a love letter to Bluey, plus a really softly worded desire to see if a great show can push itself to do it even better. I know I’m not alone in my questions (and love) for Bluey, ”Mrs. Wang said.

One person who hit Ms. Wang’s piece said, ‘These people are obsessed with forcing their out-of-control ideology on two-year-old kids who have literally no idea about sexism, racism, etc.’.

Ms. Wang asks if Blue, an Emmy-awarded show, could 'be more representative' with his character choice

Ms. Wang asks if Blue, an Emmy-awarded show, could ‘be more representative’ with his character choice

Ms. Wang took to Twitter to defend the comments she made in the article after being on the receiving end of harsh criticism

Ms. Wang took to Twitter to defend the comments she made in the article after being on the receiving end of harsh criticism

Ms. Wang replied, “Apparently I have an” unstable mind “,” I am obsessed “and” out of control “because I politely wonder if Bluey’s Brisbane can be more like the real Brisbane.

It just goes to show that politics is everywhere, and representation is important. Thanks for proving my point. ‘

Created by Brisbane-based Ludo Studio and based in Queensland’s capital, Bluey is ABC iView’s most watched program.

The animated series won the Kids: Preschool Award at the 2019 International Emmys.

Daley Pearson, Bluey’s executive producer and director of Ludo Studio, said at the time of the award that the series was a “beautiful show honoring one of the most important things: imagination and gameplay.”

Libbie Doherty, ABC Head of Children’s Content, said, “ABC Children’s is proud to broadcast Bluey to our young viewers and help them laugh, dance and play every day.”

Daily Mail Australia reached out to Ludo Studio for comment.