Advertisements
From left to right: American anti-age campaigner Ashton Applewhite, Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy, businesswoman Hana Assafiri, host Fran Kelly, native writer and activist Nayuka Gorrie, journalist and author Jess Hill

The ABC has announced that it will investigate whether the Q&A program of last week & # 39; meets editorial standards & # 39; was sufficient after panel members encouraged the murder of rapists.

Advertisements

In an extraordinary program with five hardline feminists and no men in the panel, the outspoken Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy said that women should kill rapists.

Former ABC journalist Jess Hill supported her before screenwriter Nayuka Gorrie said: & # 39; I think violence is ok & # 39 ;.

The program was moderated by host Fran Kelly and caused indignation when foul language and uncontrolled opinions flew over the desk and into the living rooms of the Australians.

Kelly made no attempt to denounce the shocking remarks, instead she boldly asked Elekawy if she was promoting violence, calling on women to kill rapists.

A furious reaction from viewers called for firing Kelly and reducing ABC funding.

From left to right: American anti-age campaigner Ashton Applewhite, Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy, businesswoman Hana Assafiri, host Fran Kelly, native writer and activist Nayuka Gorrie, journalist and author Jess Hill

Advertisements

From left to right: American anti-age campaigner Ashton Applewhite, Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy, businesswoman Hana Assafiri, host Fran Kelly, native writer and activist Nayuka Gorrie, journalist and author Jess Hill

A statement released by the ABC on Thursday afternoon said the program was presented in conjunction with festival feminist ideas, & # 39; Broadside & # 39 ;.

& # 39; The aim of the program was to present challenging ideas from high-profile feminists whose expertise extends to age, disability, indigenous issues and domestic violence, & # 39; according to the statement.

The broadcaster acknowledged that the program was & # 39; provocative with regard to the language used and some of the views presented & # 39 ;.

& # 39; Q&A has always tried to tackle difficult problems and present challenging and thought-provoking content. However, I do understand why some viewers found elements of this episode confrontational or offensive.

& # 39; We have received complaints from the public about the program, assess the concerns raised and will investigate whether the program meets the editorial standards of the ABC. & # 39;

Paul Fletcher, Secretary of Communications, said the episode & # 39; major social concern & # 39; delivered and declared determined to & # 39; fit & # 39; to investigate.

Advertisements

Dozens of viewers called on Kelly to resign and said she was perfectly at ease with violence.

Media analyst Julian Evans has complained about the show at the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).

He told Daily Mail Australia: & # 39; Violence against women, children, and men is repugnant and should be condemned on any occasion, not encouraged, discussed with joy, or presented in a way that approves and encourages the community. & # 39 ;

He also claimed that the comments broke the NSW Crimes Act prohibiting incitement to violence based on race, religion, or sexual orientation – but the New South Wales police said no complaints had been filed.

The ACMA said it had received more than 20 complaints about the delivery of Q&A.

Writer John Ruddick said the section was the & # 39; worst five minutes in the history of the ABC & # 39; used to be
Advertisements

Writer John Ruddick said the section was the & # 39; worst five minutes in the history of the ABC & # 39; used to be

Writer John Ruddick said the section was the & # 39; worst five minutes in the history of the ABC & # 39; used to be

The controversy came when a member of the public asked whether aggression and violence were the best ways for feminists to achieve equality.

Mrs. Eltahawy responded by supporting violence and saying that women should kill rapists.

She said, "I want patriarchy to fear feminism … how long do we have to wait for men and boys to stop killing us, stop beating us and stopping raping?" How many rapists should we kill until men stop raping? & # 39;

Advertisements

Host Fran Kelly then referred to a Spectator Australia tweet asking: & # 39; Why does the ABC justify violence? & # 39;

She said: & # 39; So Mona … Spectator Australia already says that Mona promotes violence. Is that what you do? & # 39;

Mrs. Eltawahy replied, "What I am doing is saying that violence is state property … exactly how long do I have to wait to be safe?"

The person who asked the question challenged the panel by suggesting that violence was not the best approach and said, "Bullying leads to bullying and violence produces violence."

The reactions immediately sparked anger on social media, as hundreds of viewers remained shocked by such brutal support for violence

The reactions immediately sparked anger on social media, as hundreds of viewers remained shocked by such brutal support for violence

Advertisements

The reactions immediately sparked anger on social media, as hundreds of viewers remained shocked by such brutal support for violence

Although the majority of responses to the show were negative, some praised the outspoken panel members

Although the majority of responses to the show were negative, some praised the outspoken panel members

Although the majority of responses to the show were negative, some praised the outspoken panel members

A viewer praised Nayuka Gorrie for the appearance of & # 39; real and true & # 39; in the show

A viewer praised Nayuka Gorrie for the appearance of & # 39; real and true & # 39; in the show

A viewer praised Nayuka Gorrie for the appearance of & # 39; real and true & # 39; in the show

Journalist and author Jess Hill then agreed to support Mrs Eltawahy's argument that violence is necessary.

& # 39; If someone is shocked by what Mona suggests, you just have to look back at the history and a certain faction of the suffragettes … they used violence, & # 39; she said. & # 39; They thought what they were fighting was a civil war between the sexes. & # 39;

The native writer and activist Nayuka Gorrie also turned out to advocate violence and said: & # 39; If you say that violence produces violence, it almost sounds as if it is a level playing field, which it is not. & # 39;

Absoluut It is absolutely not … I wonder what our tipping point in Australia will be when people start burning things up? I'm looking forward to it. & # 39;

In a commentary on Australia's colonial history, she added: & # 39; We have tried to appeal to the morality of the settlers for more than 230 years, which just doesn't seem to exist.

Advertisements

& # 39; I think violence is okay, because if someone tries to kill you, there is no question of: & # 39; But I'm really smart. I am really articulated & # 39 ;. No amount of them will save you. Let's burn things. & # 39;

The reactions immediately sparked anger on social media, as hundreds of viewers remained shocked by such brutal support for violence.

A viewer wrote: & # 39; Violence is never an option and if the ABC insists on the use of violent rhetoric, I must insist that Scott Morrison attract funding

A viewer wrote: & # 39; Violence is never an option and if the ABC insists on the use of violent rhetoric, I must insist that Scott Morrison attract funding

A viewer wrote: & # 39; Violence is never an option and if the ABC insists on the use of violent rhetoric, I must insist that Scott Morrison attract funding

One viewer enjoyed the bluntness of the debate that brought about change from politicians in the show

One viewer enjoyed the bluntness of the debate that brought about change from politicians in the show

Advertisements

One viewer enjoyed the bluntness of the debate that brought about change from politicians in the show

A viewer wrote: & # 39; Violence is never an option and if the ABC insists on the use of violent rhetoric, I must insist that Scott Morrison obtain funding from the ABC and withdraw his broadcasting license. & # 39;

Another added: & # 39; The ABC promotes violence? It would not be the first time. & # 39;

In another shocking part of the show, Mrs. Eltawahy called the prime minister a white supremacist.

& # 39; Your Prime Minister here is a mini version of Donald Trump – because we are talking about white capitalists, & # 39; she said.

Advertisements

& # 39; Your prime minister is a white evangelical Christian like Mike Pence in the US, so you are on a parallel path here. & # 39;

Mrs Eltawahy then attacked the government for Mr Morrison's proposal to ban environmental boycott campaigns.

& # 39; If you start talking about banning boycotts, you should ask what happens to your so-called democracy & she said.

The outspoken Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy (photo) dominated the show

The outspoken Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy (photo) dominated the show

The outspoken Egyptian-American writer Mona Eltahawy (photo) dominated the show

Another controversial moment came when the panel discussed Tanya Day, an indigenous woman who was arrested because she was drunk in public and died in a police cell in 2017.

In response to a question about how institutions can be held more responsible for racism, Gorrie said the police should be closed.

& # 39; Its formation was in the interest of white sovereignty in this country, & # 39; she said.

& # 39; When we talk about accountability, I am not sure how far we can go to hold an organization like the police to account because it must be violent & # 39 ;.

& # 39; It's patriarchal, it's overwhelmingly white. I don't think it should exist. & # 39;

The show also came under fire for repeated use of foul language, which led Kelly to say: & We are trying to keep the language under control. If you have been offended by blasphemy, then perhaps leave now. & # 39;

Shortly thereafter, in the section on police racism, ma'am Eltawahy made no attempt to moderate her words and said: & # 39;You ask the person here who travels the world to say f *** the patriarchy. & # 39;

Death in a police cell: the tragedy of Tanya Day

Tanya Day, 55, was arrested by the police for being drunk on a train to Melbourne.

The police took her into custody after they found her sleeping with her feet on a chair and when she was asked for a ticket, she responded confused.

The CCTV footage from a cell at Castlemaine police station on December 5, 2017 showed that Mrs. Day slammed her forehead against a wall at 4.11 pm and seemed to lose movement in her right arm.

The fall resulted in a brain haemorrhage and Mrs. Day died 17 days later in a hospital in Melbourne.

Her family urged everyone to view it so that they could understand the suffering of their mother and the alleged negligence of racism by police and paramedics.

Tanya Day, 55, was arrested by the Victorian police for being drunk on a train to Melbourne

Tanya Day, 55, was arrested by the Victorian police for being drunk on a train to Melbourne

Tanya Day, 55, was arrested by the Victorian police for being drunk on a train to Melbourne

. (tagsToTranslate) dailymail (t) news (t) Scott Morrison