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A woman who has suffered a miscarriage in quarantine is forced to stay in her hotel for another five days

A woman who had suffered a miscarriage in quarantine was forced to remain in her hotel room for five more days after being denied parole.

The Melbourne woman underwent a compulsory 14-day COVID-19 quarantine at the Mercure hotel after returning from abroad on April 15 when she miscarried.

She was taken to Royal Women’s Hospital, but immediately returned to the room after receiving medical treatment.

Shortly after she returned, her husband sent an email to the Victorian Department of Health asking the couple and their three-year-old son to perform the rest of their mandatory isolation at their Tarneit home in the west of the city.

A Melbourne woman who miscarried at a hotel during mandatory quarantine was forced to remain in the room for five more days after the Victorian Department of Health messed up her case (stock)

A Melbourne woman who miscarried at a hotel during mandatory quarantine was forced to remain in the room for five more days after the Victorian Department of Health messed up her case (stock)

“Since she miscarried, she has been struggling to hide her emotions from our three-year-old,” her husband wrote to the department, ABC news reports.

“My three-year-old asked why Mommy is bleeding and” Why is Mommy crying? “It is very difficult for us to grieve in quarantine [a] one room hotel.

‘I am especially concerned about the after-effects [sic] in this situation where she can’t even open the door to breathe … I’m more concerned about the long-term impact on her mental well-being. ‘

Later in the evening, the service apologized for the loss of the family, saying their request would be considered.

While they waited, the couple regularly made unsuccessful requests to medical personnel working at the hotel for permission to leave.

Five days later, the family still received no response from the government.

The man sent the department another email, but when an official replied six hours later that the family could leave the next day, he made a surprising confession.

He said the request had been granted the day after her miscarriage, but he had failed to tell because he was dealing with an ‘extremely large number of emails’ and had missed the request regarding the family exemption.

The regulator apologized for his mistake, saying her case had led to improvements in procedures to ensure it didn’t happen to anyone else.

While the woman praised the treatment she received from doctor’s nurses and hotel staff, she said she was troubled by the DHHS’s inaction.

The case is one of many cases identified in an investigation by the broadcaster indicating that the mental health needs of those who have been quarantined have not been adequately addressed.

Quarantined people have complained that they struggled to get help for mental health issues while performing mandatory 14-day quarantine in hotel rooms (stock)

Quarantined people have complained that they struggled to get help for mental health issues while performing mandatory 14-day quarantine in hotel rooms (stock)

Quarantined people have complained that they struggled to get help for mental health issues while performing mandatory 14-day quarantine in hotel rooms (stock)

In several states, quarantined people said they struggled to get help with mental health problems, leading to periods of extreme anxiety, panic attacks, and self-harm concerns.

In April, a Queensland man quarantined in Sydney suffered a panic attack due to a lack of communication from health officials.

The man had tested positive for COVID-19 and was in quarantine in his third week, but struggled to get information about the steps he needed to take to be released.

After three days of confusion, he had a panic attack, but the hotel staff told him there was nothing they could do to help.

He spent three hours shaking and crying in his room before calling the COVID-19 helpline for help, eventually being connected to a nurse and accessing a psychologist after a two to three day wait.

The man, now fully recovered and returned to his home in Noosa, has since received an apology from the Sydney Local Health district.

Similarly, a Melbourne man reported an episode of mental health while staying at the Novotel South Wharf on April 22.

He had complained of chest pain from a panic attack caused by his divorce from his wife, but had received no response from the hotel staff.

The couple were separated after an argument, but their subsequent request to be reunited in one room was declined.

When the ambulance arrived, he said he was extremely excited and not in his normal state, screaming and shouting in the presence of police officers, which could have easily led to his arrest.

A Victorian DHHS spokesman declined to comment on the matter, but said he knew that quarantine could be “challenging and disturbing.”

Questions will be conducted in multiple states about the mental health treatment available to those in mandatory quarantine. Depicted are passengers disembarking from Melbourne Airport to enter mandatory isolation on April 12, 2020

Questions will be conducted in multiple states about the mental health treatment available to those in mandatory quarantine. Depicted are passengers disembarking from Melbourne Airport to enter mandatory isolation on April 12, 2020

Questions will be conducted in multiple states about the mental health treatment available to those in mandatory quarantine. Depicted are passengers disembarking from Melbourne Airport to enter mandatory isolation on April 12, 2020

Dr Julie Manasseh said it was clear that mental health needs were not considered in a hurry to create safe facilities that could contain COVID-19.

As a general practitioner, she worked in two quarantine hotels in Perth on behalf of a contractor hired by the West Australian Health Department, often consulting ailing guests over the phone.

She said problems were often related to mental health issues and the situation of isolation, rather than medical issues, because no one told them about what happened and they were trapped in a room for 14 days.

It’s because studies will be held in multiple states on the mental health treatment available to those in mandatory quarantine.

In Victoria, the coroner investigates the case of a man believed to have died by suicide on April 11 in quarantine at a Melbourne hotel.

Meanwhile, the WA Ombudsman is investigating multiple complaints about the treatment of a Navy veteran with post-traumatic stress disorder who has suffered an extreme setback in a quarantine hotel.

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