A virtual corpse could help solve the medical shortage of corpses

Researchers from the Medical University of Montpellier in France are using 3D scanners to create "virtual corpses". The virtual dissection can be used with a web interface or with a professional touch screen for surgical simulation

A worldwide shortage of corpses for medical use has pressured scientists to devise new ways to train future doctors.

Researchers from the Medical University of Montpellier in France are using 3D scanners to create "virtual corpses".

A worldwide increase in medical programs has led to an increase in the demand for corpses, since at the same time there are fewer unclaimed corpses around the world.

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Researchers from the Medical University of Montpellier in France are using 3D scanners to create "virtual corpses". The virtual dissection can be used with a web interface or with a professional touch screen for surgical simulation

Researchers from the Medical University of Montpellier in France are using 3D scanners to create "virtual corpses". The virtual dissection can be used with a web interface or with a professional touch screen for surgical simulation

Researchers hope that a virtual corpse can teach students the basics of dissection.

"In many faculties, in France and abroad, not all medical students have access to the opportunity to practice dissection to learn anatomy," Guillaume Captier, a surgeon and professor at Montepellier, told DailyMail.com.

"This is even more true in countries where dissection is prohibited or not practiced," he continued.

The Captier team created two separate virtual dissections: one in the neck area and one in the pelvis.

He performed the dissections on a real corpse, layer by layer. At each level, technician Benjamin Moreno scanned the flesh and body parts on the computer with an Artec 3D scanner, stacking them so that the entire body is visible.

The virtual dissection can be used with a web interface or with a professional touch screen for surgical simulation.

Since 2010, the High Health Authority (HAS) of France recommended that the teaching of surgery and technical gestures not be performed for the first time on a patient.

"This implies the need for simulation teaching, realistic enough to reproduce the surgical anatomy of operations and evaluate technical learning," said Captier.

"The goal is to create a 3D database of the main anatomical regions of interest and to develop a silico virtual dissection method to simulate realistic and customizable traditional anatomical dissection, which remains the standard for learning anatomy," he continued.

The virtual dissection can be used in learning the anatomy for students and apprentices in surgery before going to the operating room & # 39;

The Captier team created two separate virtual dissections: one in the neck area and one in the pelvis. At each level, technician Benjamin Moreno scanned the flesh and body parts on the computer with a 3D Artec scanner, stacking them so that the whole body is visible

The Captier team created two separate virtual dissections: one in the neck area and one in the pelvis. At each level, technician Benjamin Moreno scanned the flesh and body parts on the computer with a 3D Artec scanner, stacking them so that the whole body is visible

The Captier team created two separate virtual dissections: one in the neck area and one in the pelvis. At each level, technician Benjamin Moreno scanned the flesh and body parts on the computer with a 3D Artec scanner, stacking them so that the whole body is visible

HOW DO YOU FIND A DISAPPEARED CADAVER?

There are several scientific methods that can help locate missing bodies, one of the most important is to identify variations in the surface, such as depressions or small hills, which could indicate that a body has been buried below.

Search teams can also use & # 39; corpse dogs & # 39; specialized to smell remains or geophysical methods to scan identified areas.

The latter includes a ground penetrating radar, which uses radar pulses to obtain images of the subsoil.

The ground penetration radar is the best to locate bodies that have been wrapped in something (the wrap provides a good reflective surface).

In other cases, where the body is still decomposing, fluids such as corpse blood can be detected by machines that measure electrical resistivity: the force with which a material opposes the flow of an electric current.

The corpses have been scarce all over the world in recent years. The number of medical students is increasing, as is the number of programs that need corpses.

Full-fledged doctors also need corpses to continue their medical training. Researchers and pharmaceutical companies use the bodies to continue developing new procedures and treatments.

Some bodies that have the potential to be corpses instead go to organ donation, others go to the police to train the dogs and some even go to the auto companies to test the cars in the safety tests.

Improved means of communication have also limited the supply. Often, unclaimed bodies go to medical research. In some parts of the world, it is prohibited to donate bodies to be used as corpses.

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