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A taxi driver who has run down and killed a pedestrian is exempted from fatal injury from dangerous driving

Distracted taxi driver who ran down and killed a pedestrian is cleared of causing his death from dangerous driving

  • Amanpreet Singh ran down and killed Manjit Dhadwal, 61, on a road in Adelaide
  • Singh, a taxi driver, has been found guilty of aggravated driving without due care
  • He was acquitted for more serious causes of death from dangerous driving

A Adelaide taxi driver who ran down and killed a pedestrian has been found guilty of aggravated driving without due care.

However, Amanpreet Singh was acquitted on a more serious charge of death from dangerous driving after 61-year-old Manjit Dhadwal was killed in a wet night in November 2017.

District Court judge Barry Beazley ruled on Tuesday that Singh was distracted by monitors in his taxi and did not see the victim on the road for the impact on the Anzac Highway in Kurralta Park.

A Adelaide taxi driver who has run down and killed a pedestrian has been found guilty of aggravated driving without due care (file picture)

A Adelaide taxi driver who has run down and killed a pedestrian has been found guilty of aggravated driving without due care (file picture)

But he said he should have known that there might be people crossing the road at the time because of a nearby bus shelter.

“This is not a case where the suspect could not have seen the deceased,” said the judge.

“He could have been seen, albeit closer to the point of impact, and despite his dark clothes and indeed the irresponsible decision to cross the road in his alcoholic state.”

The judge said he did not have to determine whether Singh could have prevented the collision.

“The question is whether the suspect drove with the care one would expect from a reasonably sensible driver in his position,” he said.

“I accept that he didn’t expect anyone to cross the road at the time, but he didn’t look any further until the moment of the collision.”

Judge Beazley said he was beyond reasonable doubt that the accused was distracted while driving and that the distraction was more than “mere inattention.”

In defense of the charges, Singh denied that he was tired or otherwise seriously inattentive and denied that he should have seen Mr. Dhadwal before the collision.

He was referring to the general darkness on the roadway, including the shadowing of trees, combined with the bad weather; the dark clothing of the deceased; and the absence of other people around.

Singh will be sentenced later.

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