Home Australia A sinkhole swallows the coast at Inskip Point, where tourists gather to take the ferry to the holiday island K’Gari.

A sinkhole swallows the coast at Inskip Point, where tourists gather to take the ferry to the holiday island K’Gari.

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Rangers filmed the moment a large section of coastline collapsed in a landslide, commonly known as a sinkhole, at Inskip Point in Queensland.

Australian park rangers filmed the moment a large section of the beach’s coastline collapsed into the ocean.

Queensland Department of Environment, Science and Innovation staff observed the landslide, also known as a sinkhole, at Inskip Point on the state’s southeast coast on Monday.

Witnesses were stunned as the sinkhole quickly devoured much of the sandy shoreline, crumbling into the waves.

The department explained: “Inskip Point is a sandy land mass that has been formed by wind and waves.”

The beach is the closest point on the mainland to K’Gari, formerly Fraser Island, and tourists flock to the spot to take the ferry ride to the island.

The same beach made the news after a sinkhole, longer than a football field and several meters deep, swallowed a car, a caravan, a caravan and tents.

Rangers filmed the moment a large section of coastline collapsed in a landslide, commonly known as a sinkhole, at Inskip Point in Queensland.

The steep edge left by the landslide was well above the height of an adult and the sand formed a layer over the salt water.

The steep edge left by the landslide was well above the height of an adult and the sand formed a layer over the salt water.

The department said sinkholes in the area were common.

‘The peninsula is a very dynamic environment where strong winds and waves naturally impact the sandy coastline.

“These events at Inskip Point are commonly called sinkholes, but are technically known as landslides or nearshore landslides.”

They said that while “they can’t be predicted,” Inskip Point is a well-known sinkhole site.

Despite the coastal collapse, beach sand will soon be replenished as cliffs collapse further south along the Cooloola coast, causing sand to shift northwards.

‘Following similar events near Inskip Point, QPWS introduced a buffer zone along the coast with no camping or vehicles allowed in this zone. “The beach section remains open to pedestrians and daytime activities,” the department said.

“Campground boundaries are maintained behind vegetated dune areas to reduce impacts on vegetation stabilization and reduce potential risk to campers.”

The department noted that the landslides

The department noted that landslides “cannot be predicted,” but Inskip Point is a well-known sinkhole site.

The department introduced a

The department introduced a “buffer zone” near the sinkhole that prohibits camping and vehicles.

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