A remedy for baldness is en route using human stem cells

A cure for baldness is en route, while scientists successfully & # 39; unlimited & # 39; grow hair on mice using stem cells – and now refine the process for use in humans

  • A potential remedy for baldness was presented at the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) conference on Thursday in Los Angeles
  • Scientists from Sanford Burnham Prebys have created hair follicles that grow through the skin using man-made pluripotent stem cells
  • In tests, scientists transplanted human stem cells and mouse cells together on scaffolding placed under the skin of hairless mice and were able to grow hair follicles
  • Now they are refining the process that needs to be applied to people
  • The process uses dermal papilla cells – which are located in the hair follicles and regulate hair growth and are derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.
  • This process differs from others because human iPSCs offer an unlimited supply of cells and can be derived from a simple blood test.
  • & # 39; This is a crucial breakthrough in the development of cell-based treatments for hair loss and the regenerative medicine field & # 39 ;, said Alexey Terskikh.
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A cure for baldness can be on the horizon with human stem cells to get an & # 39; unlimited amount & & # 39; grow natural hair.

The groundbreaking findings were shared at the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) conference on Thursday in Los Angeles.

Scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have created hair follicles that grow through the skin using man-made pluripotent stem cells on mice – which could eventually be used to resolve human baldness.

The astonishing findings received a Merit Award at the conference and Stemson Therapeutics has licensed the technology, according to Eureka Alert.

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A potential cure for baldness was presented at the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) conference on Thursday in Los Angeles, where scientists could grow hair on hairless rats using human stem cells. The hair growth on a hairless rat pictured above, fluorescence microscopy image of hair follicles under the skin enclosed right

A potential cure for baldness was presented at the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) conference on Thursday in Los Angeles, where scientists could grow hair on hairless rats using human stem cells. The hair growth on a hairless rat pictured above, fluorescence microscopy image of hair follicles under the skin enclosed right

In trials, scientists transplanted human stem cells onto mouse cells and attached them to tiny scaffolding to control the direct growth of the hair and help them integrate into the skin. Those scaffolds were then placed under the skin of mice and the hair came through.

Now scientists hope to apply the same process to people.

& # 39; Our new protocol described today takes away the key technological challenges that our discovery of real use has kept & # 39; said Dr. Alexey Terskikh, associate professor at the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute in La Jolla , California.

& # 39; Now we have a robust, highly controlled method for generating natural looking hair that grows through the skin using an unlimited source of human iPSC-derived dermal papilla cells. This is a crucial breakthrough in the development of cell-based treatments for hair loss and regenerative medicine, ”he added.

So how does this technology work? The cell used is called dermal papilla, which is located in the hair follicles and controls hair growth, thickness and length.

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The dermal papilla cells are derived from induced pluripotent stem cells that act as embryonic stem cells from normal adult cells, according to the Morning Call.

Alexey V. Terskikh, a scientist at the Sanford-Burnham Medical Discovery Institute, leads the pioneering process of hair cell growth

Alexey V. Terskikh, a scientist at the Sanford-Burnham Medical Discovery Institute, leads the pioneering process of hair cell growth

Alexey V. Terskikh, a scientist at the Sanford-Burnham Medical Discovery Institute, leads the pioneering process of hair cell growth

Now scientists are applying the process to people combining human iPSC-derived epithelial and dermal papilla cells to make it grow

Now scientists are applying the process to people combining human iPSC-derived epithelial and dermal papilla cells to make it grow

Now scientists are applying the process to people combining human iPSC-derived epithelial and dermal papilla cells to make it grow

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In 2015, Terskikh successfully allowed her to grow under the skin of the mouse using those stem cells, but without any control over growth. The refined protocol now determines how much hair is grown and in which direction.

Heal baldness with the help of human stem cells

Scientists from the Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute have grown hair on mice by mixing human stem cells and mouse cells.

The process uses dermal papilla cells, which are located in the hair follicles and regulate hair growth and length.

They are derived from man-made pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) that act as embryonic stem cells from normal adult cells & # 39 ;.

In tests, the stem cells are inoculated with mouse cells and placed on biodegradable scaffolds introduced under the skin of mice.

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The scaffold then controls the growth and direction of the growth of hair that comes through the skin.

On Thursday, the more advanced process was presented at the conference and includes the placement of 3D biodegradable scaffolding – made from the same material as soluble stitches – with mouse epithelial cells in combination with human dermal papilla cells and placed under the skin of naked mice, which are not have body hair. .

When the biodegradable scaffold disappears, there is only a healthy hair that grows as normal.

Scientists are now applying the process to people combining human IPSC-derived epithelial and dermal papilla cells to grow hair.

This process differs from others in follicle regeneration because human iPSCs offer an unlimited supply of cells and can be derived from a simple blood draw.

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& # 39; Hair loss deeply affects the lives of many people. An important part of my practice involves both men and women who are looking for solutions to their hair loss, & Dr. 39 explained. Richard Chaffoo, a triple certified plastic surgeon who founded La Jolla Hair MD and is a medical adviser to Stemson Therapeutics.

& # 39; I am determined to promote this groundbreaking technology that could improve the lives of millions of people struggling with hair loss, & # 39; he added.

Stemson hopes to grow it for customers who use their own IPS cells. Because these cells come from their own blood, they are probably accepted by their immune system.

The company's long-term goal is to provide transplants made from cells taken from other donors, allowing the hair to be grown in advance and more affordable.

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