A quiet suburb promises to fight against real estate developers who try to ruin their city and # 039;

Thousands of angry residents are fighting against a proposed development in their quiet suburb for fear of creating an unsustainable population in the area

Thousands of angry residents are fighting for a proposed development in their quiet suburb for fear that it will create an unsustainable population in the area.

Residents of Dingley Village, in southeastern Melbourne, made 8000 submissions to the Kingston Council regarding development, a record for the area.

The development is set for Kingswood Golf Club after the land was purchased by the ISPT property management company, on behalf of Australian Super, in 2014.

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Thousands of angry residents are fighting against a proposed development in their quiet suburb for fear of creating an unsustainable population in the area

Thousands of angry residents are fighting against a proposed development in their quiet suburb for fear of creating an unsustainable population in the area

The developers asked the Council of Kingston that the land be redesigned for a new development that could accommodate 760 new homes

The developers asked the Council of Kingston that the land be redesigned for a new development that could accommodate 760 new homes

The developers asked the Council of Kingston that the land be redesigned for a new development that could accommodate 760 new homes

The developers submitted a request to the Council of Kingston to redesign the land for a new development that could house 760 new homes.

The land will also be subdivided into 514 lots, including six superlots.

Simone Hardham said that one of the main concerns for current residents is the increase in population if more than 700 new houses are built, claiming that the area could not cope.

"There is simply no space, it is a big concern, it is not a row house that is being built next door and we do not like it because it will block our sight, this will affect our entire community," he said. He said.

Other residents claim that they were never approached about the proposed development.

Longtime resident David Madill, whose home is located on the golf course, said the idea was a "failure".

Simone Hardham said that one of the main concerns for current residents is the increase in population if more than 700 new houses are built, claiming that the area could not cope.

"They gave us a set of plans and we said: This is what you get, whether you like it or not, it's a planning failure, it's a culture of developers who think they can go in and do anything and then leave," He told A Current Affair.

He said the community enjoyed the lives of the birds that nested around the golf club and, despite assurances that the development would plant more trees, said residents feared it could affect wildlife.

"I do not think you can go to many other places and see thirty rare species of birds fly to your backyard and sit there and watch while doing gardening," he said.

There are amendments in the planning scheme that attempt to address problems related to vegetation and wildlife.

Residents of Dingley Village, in southeastern Melbourne, made 8,000 submissions against the development to Kingston Council, a record for the area

Residents of Dingley Village, in southeastern Melbourne, made 8,000 submissions against the development to Kingston Council, a record for the area

Residents of Dingley Village, in southeastern Melbourne, made 8,000 submissions against the development to Kingston Council, a record for the area

This includes an Overlay of Vegetation Protection, Overlap of Environmental Importance and Significant Landscape Overlay to protect significant vegetation on the site, according to a council statement.

The Kingston Council issued a statement in July informing the public of the proposal and opened a "consultation period" for residents, which was what led to the 8,000 submissions.

Kingston Mayor Steve Staikos said the council knew that the development would attract the interest of the communities.

"After the comment period of the community, the council must vote whether or not they wish to refer the matter to an independent panel for advice." he said.

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