A quarter of Americans say that men have to work while women stay at home and take care of their families

About 25 percent of Americans believe men should be breadwinners, while women stay at home and take care of the family – including 5 percent who fully agree, according to a new survey.

That number has declined in recent decades, but still represents a significant proportion of the population who think women do not belong in the workplace, according to the General Social Survey, an extensive survey that has followed American beliefs and beliefs since 1972.

Researchers first asked the respondents in 1977 whether they agreed or disagreed with the statement: & # 39; It is much better for all involved if the man is the performer outside the house and the woman takes care of the house and the family. & # 39;

This chart follows from 1972-2018 the proportion of Americans who agree and disagree with the statement that women should stay at home to take care of their families while men go to work

This chart follows from 1972-2018 the proportion of Americans who agree and disagree with the statement that women should stay at home to take care of their families while men go to work

At the time, 65 percent of Americans believed that women belonged. The number fell sharply in 1985 to 47.2 percent of American adults and has since experienced a largely downward trend.

Rosabeth M. Kanter, a Harvard Business Professor and author of & # 39; Men and Women of the Corporation & # 39 ;, told DailyMail.com that she was not surprised by the results of the research.

& # 39; First, it has fallen in recent decades, with more people accepting two breadwinners or two domestic partners as normal, & # 39; she said. & # 39; Second, there are low-income families for whom it would be a great luxury to have that lifestyle. & # 39;

& # 39; The opportunity is much more open and women have real power – that is, control over resources, the ability to set the agenda & # 39 ;, Kanter said.

When her book was published in 1977, there were many professions where there were only one or a few women in a male workgroup, even at the entry level & # 39 ;, she added. & # 39; Now the problem of minority or token status in the ranks has risen – (it is) more likely in higher echelons than below. & # 39;

In 2018 an opinion broke by men with 27 percent of men, compared with 22 percent of women who said that women should stay at home.

The problem was also partial: 30 percent of republicans said it would be better if women stayed at home, compared to 19 percent of democrats and 26 percent of independents.

Attitudes varied between classes, with 36 percent of the poorest Americans believing that women are better off at home, compared to 24 percent of the working class and 23 percent of the middle and upper class.

This chart shows how many Americans from different political parties agree or disagree with the statement that things would generally be better if women stayed at home to look after the family while men started working as primary breadwinners.

This chart shows how many Americans from different political parties agree or disagree with the statement that things would generally be better if women stayed at home to look after the family while men started working as primary breadwinners.

This chart shows how many Americans from different political parties agree or disagree with the statement that things would generally be better if women stayed at home to look after the family while men started working as primary breadwinners.

The study follows the heels of the # metoo era of reducing sexual harassment and inappropriate behavior at work – and follows the election of the largest proportion of women in Congress in American history.

& # 39; The fact that there is so much debate about getting parity in every area gives me hope, & # 39; Kanter said. & # 39; The number of female leaders is now high enough that leaders come together to advocate for women in boards of directors, women in elected positions, women who receive more venture capital (of which they receive very little). I expect that the change will accelerate. & # 39;

& # 39; There is a change of generation in what being older means, & # 39; Kanter said. & # 39; Millennials are more likely to work in equal parts – or he reduces his work obligations while accelerating. This will also change the perception. & # 39;

Age was a factor in the survey, with 38 percent of Americans aged 65 and over who said women would be better off at home, compared to 26 percent of 50-64 year-olds, 20 percent of 35-49 year-olds and 19 percent of those 18-34.

This chart shows how many Americans in each region of the country agree or disagree with the statement that things would generally be better if women stayed at home to look after the family while men started working as primary breadwinners.

This chart shows how many Americans in each region of the country agree or disagree with the statement that things would generally be better if women stayed at home to look after the family while men started working as primary breadwinners.

This chart shows how many Americans in each region of the country agree or disagree with the statement that things would generally be better if women stayed at home to look after the family while men started working as primary breadwinners.

Opinions also split regionally, with 32 percent of Southern people saying that women should be at home, compared to 25 percent in the West, 18 percent in the Northeast and 17 percent in the Midwest.

The unemployed would rather say that women should not work – 27 percent compared to 20 percent of employees.

Americans who did not finish high school were the largest demographic group to feel that way (48 percent), compared to 26 percent of those with a high school and 16 percent of those with a university degree or higher.

Attitudes did not break out in a racial sense, with 23 percent of white and black Americans feeling that families are better off if women stay at home.

In general, women are now in a better place than in the 1970s, but some differences persist, Kanter said.

& # 39; The domestic division of labor has not changed much & # 39 ;, Kanter said. & # 39; It is even more likely that women do even more at home while they work than male counterparts. There are also single mothers, gay partners, etc. Standards about what a family is have changed. & # 39;