A Portland City employee receives a $ 80,000 payout for claims he had imposed on colleagues in hazing

The city of Portland is finalizing a $ 80,000 settlement to end a lawsuit by a former employee who said he was subjected to & # 39; extreme hazing & # 39; in brotherhood style by urban transport operators.

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Adam Rawlins said he had been the target of horrible jokes for months in 2016, including an incident in which he was depicted while being locked up in a dark barn and bound by duct tape and cable ties, the Oregonian / OregonLive reported.

He also said in the US court that he was often forced to take off his shirt and then shoot with metal screws, wooden strips, popcorn kernels, and hard candies fired from an air compressor that caused bruises, blisters, and stretch marks.

Rawlins had to sit in the back of a city truck, while a colleague & # 39; hit the nipples and twisted & # 39; on his chest, the suit claims.

Adam Rawlins sued the city of Portland last year and said for months he was the subject of & # 39; extreme verbal and physical hazing & # 39 ;, including being tied with duct tape and zip-ties and locked in a dark shed (photo) )

Adam Rawlins sued the city of Portland last year and said for months he was the subject of & # 39; extreme verbal and physical hazing & # 39 ;, including being tied with duct tape and zip-ties and locked in a dark shed (photo) )

He said he was pushed, bumped and daily called derogatory names.

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A consultant later adopted by the city found a & # 39; non-snitch & # 39; culture within the Portland Bureau of Transportation maintenance operation, which promoted a workplace where disrespectful comments, racially charged political comments, and sexist views are common. .

The consultant discovered that the outgrowth seemed to be isolated.

Rawlins sued the city in Multnomah County Circuit Court last year in search of $ 250,000 before taking his case to the federal court to pursue $ 660,000, the Oregonian / OregonLive reported.

The Portland City Council will receive the proposed scheme for approval on Wednesday.

The city's risk management department predicted that & # 39; there is a risk that the city could be held liable & # 39 ;.

& # 39; That's why we think it's wise to make a compromise right now to avoid the risk of a negative jury price & # 39 ;, the division wrote in a note.

Rawlins' lawyer, Benjamin Rosenthal, intended to claim that the maintenance department of the transportation agency had a history in which employees could hire new employees who were still in their probationary periods.

There was reportedly a & # 39; non-snitch & # 39; culture within the Portland Bureau of Transportation maintenance operation
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There was reportedly a & # 39; non-snitch & # 39; culture within the Portland Bureau of Transportation maintenance operation

There was reportedly a & # 39; not snitch & # 39; culture within the Portland Bureau of Transportation maintenance operation (photo)

There was reportedly a & # 39; not snitch & # 39; culture within the Portland Bureau of Transportation maintenance operation (photo)

There was reportedly a & # 39; snitch & # 39; culture within the Portland Bureau of Transportation maintenance operation (photo right)

The lawsuit also said that many employees and a supervisor were aware of the hazing, but & # 39; did not take any form of immediate appropriate and corrective action to stop it & # 39 ;.

The hazing left Rawlins humiliated, depressed, painful and sleep deprived of stress, but he didn't complain about higher ups because he was worried about losing his job as a utility worker, Rosenthal said Oregonian / OregonLive last year.

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& # 39; He's a young child, he's twenty, he just wanted to keep working there, & # 39; Rosenthal told the outlet. & # 39; So he was scared to complain. & # 39;

A personnel survey was conducted when managers discovered the allegations at a higher level.

In May 2017 Willamette week reported in a nine-page & # 39; s staff report – discovered that some hazing had taken place and painted a picture of a workplace culture that rewarded loyalty and & # 39; snitching & # 39; discouraged.

The newspaper reported that the primary target of the investigation was an 11-year-old city worker named Jerry Munson, who led a small sewer maintenance team and used a specially rigged high-pressure air gun to fire various hard objects at his subordinates for years.

Allegedly, Munson dropped fries on the floor after an employee had cleaned it on his first workday and said, "Pick them up, b — h & # 39 ;. When the worker did that, Munson said: & Wow, you are now a life for life & # 39 ;.

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Rawlins resigned from his city job as a utility worker earlier this year.

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