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A new Netflix show takes a bunch of pampered 20-somethings and dumps them in the wilds of Cumbria

When 26-year-old Rae Hume was invited to participate in a new reality TV show, she envisioned herself partying and preening a la Love Island. Her luggage consisted of makeup – “eyeshadow palettes, contour kits, everything” – and mini skirts, with lots of heels.

“I just knew it was a new show called something like Living Your Best Life,” she says. “I packed a lot of party clothes, but I secretly hoped that we would show up and that there would be a pile of Pretty Little Thing stuff for us to choose from.”

When they arrived, the ten participants were told to open their suitcases and take out the most important things. “I only brought a few things with me, but all my makeup,” she recalls.

“I thought we’d get most of our stuff later. Maybe we went on a nice trip.’

Rae Hume, 26, (right) was invited to join a new reality TV show, figuring it would be similar to Love Island.  Snowflake Mountain is Netflix's controversial new reality show that puts spoiled twenty-somethings to the test

Rae Hume, 26, (right) was invited to join a new reality TV show, figuring it would be similar to Love Island. Snowflake Mountain is Netflix’s controversial new reality show that puts spoiled twenty-somethings to the test

But she and the other twenty-somethings were in for a shock. They watched as the suitcases were loaded onto a trailer and then unceremoniously blown to pieces.

Rae was speechless. There were tears, objections – especially from the youngster who had brought a suitcase full of Gucci and Burberry – but the worst was to come. They would have to wear only the clothes they had in their ‘essential’ bags for the next three weeks, and they would camp for the time being in the wilderness, in the Lake District, without their cell phones.

Because this wasn’t Love Island or Geordie Shore – the kind of show everyone involved (mostly wannabe influencers with no real job plans that might involve hard grafts) thought they signed up for. They were instead on survival training, with no running water, no shops, and absolutely no wifi. The horror!

Welcome to Snowflake Mountain, Netflix’s controversial new reality show, which claims to offer tough love to ten twenty-somethings whose own parents consider them ‘snowflakes’ – shy, oversensitive, indiscipline, overly dependent on their parents, unable to handle the to find a sink to wash a plate, let alone take care of oneself.

The show features two military survival types, Matt Tate and Joel Graves, who teach the contestants basic skills

The show features two military survival types, Matt Tate and Joel Graves, who teach the contestants basic skills

Does Love Island make you scream in horror at the state of the world? Then this might be the reality show for you.

“I was speechless when I heard it. I was able to laugh, but some of the others were in tears,” says Rae of Rochester, Kent. “I was expecting a villa with a pool and maybe a hot tub. Instead, I was handed an ax and they wanted me to cut down a tree.’ Also with her nails! (In true snowflake fashion, Rae is also hilariously high maintenance in the nail department).

Some parents, like that of spoiled New Yorker Francesca, had actively begged the program makers to take their obnoxious offspring (Francesca’s mother said, “Please take her now”); others, like Rae’s, were in cahoots with the team.

“They’ve been talking to my parents behind my back,” Rae reveals. “So they knew what was happening before I knew it.”

I expected a villa with a pool and hot tub

The highly controversial show has been accused of trolling an entire generation—while being praised for finally standing up to snowflake nonsense. It involves two military survival types, Matt Tate and Joel Graves, which teach the participants basic skills. While you may wonder how many of the tasks will equip them for real life—they have to dig their own toilets, build a fire, and learn to skin a deer—it quickly becomes apparent that some of these young adults, or “children,” never done something for themselves.

“They had genuine questions about how to wash the dishes,” said Joel, who is an ex-US Navy and has seen action in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Eight of the first ten participants (an eleventh arrives later, in Love Island ‘bombshell’ fashion) are from the US. The American contingent includes Olivia, a self-proclaimed Disney princess, Deandra, a “chaos Queen” fired from every job she’s ever held, and a man with a “nice job” named Solomon, who earns more than £400 a week. week on care.

Not all young people have ambition. Randy, for example, aspires to become a pro wrestler nicknamed “the white collar, billion dollar, big baller, spark plug brawler.”

Where does Rae fit in? Well, she’s one of only two Britons – the other being Liam Brown, from Warwickshire – to be selected.

Despite being 24 when she applied, she still lived at home. Her mother, Jane, did all her cooking and washing and lent her money to put gas in her car. Was she a snowflake? Yes, she says.

When they arrived at the show, the ten contestants were told to open their bags and take out the most important things.

When they arrived at the show, the ten contestants were told to open their bags and take out the most important things.

‘I’m holding my hand against it. I haven’t done very well in adult life. I wanted to be Peter Pan. And I’m not very good at applying myself, so I fluttered from job to job.

“I never saved money, despite my parents trying to earn me. And I never thought I would ever leave my mother and father’s house. They still did everything for me – out of love, of course.

‘I’m dyslexic, and a bit organised, so my mother would micromanage me. When I wanted to lose weight, I went to Slimming World and my mom would also come and write down the recipes for me.

‘I had never actually been away from them for more than a week. The biggest shock was that they took our phones. We also had no running water, but the shock was the lack of telephones.”

Each day, Matt and Joel create the team’s survival tasks designed to teach responsibility, discipline and teamwork. Similar to I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out Of Here!, participants eat only when they work together and complete tasks.

There are tears and tantrums.  It helps, of course, that there was a cash prize for those who lasted: $50,000 (£41,000) for the winner, but money will be deducted from the final prize pool for each participant who quits

There are tears and tantrums. It helps, of course, that there was a cash prize for those who lasted: $50,000 (£41,000) for the winner, but money will be deducted from the final prize pool for each participant who quits

There are tears and tantrums. It helps, of course, that there was a cash prize for those who held out: $50,000 (£41,000) for the winner, but money is deducted from the final prize pool for each entrant who quits, which, says Rae, “kinda forced us to work as a team. If you were selfish, everyone lost it.” If the participants are ungrateful or fail to bear their weight, they are forced to leave their tents and sleep in the open air. It’s the snowflake equivalent of the naughty step.

However, did it succeed? Rae insists it did.

‘It has changed my life. I learned so much about myself – that I could be a disciplined person. I grew up. I came home and left. I now live with my boyfriend. Granted, still on the same street as my parents, but I’ve moved, and it’s great. I can now walk around and sit and have a conversation without my mom nagging me to clean up my bedroom.

‘I think everyone should experience something like this. One of the mottos they taught us was “Discipline equals freedom”. I love that. I’m going to live my life to it now. Maybe I’ll get it tattooed.’ While she wouldn’t put herself in the “righteous brat” category, she does think most people her age are snowflakes too, and her contemporaries need to get a grip.

“I think a lot of my generation is — not every member of it. My sister is four years younger than me, and she has always been very responsible. She got a job and stayed with it and bought her own house, so she adopted our parents’ values ​​and people like her deserve it. Then there are people like me – who want to live in the moment – and I think we are in the majority!’

It has changed my life. I learned so much. I grew up

Rae’s parents run a fashion store near their Rochester home and although she started working there in her teens, you couldn’t tell she’s developed a fierce work ethic. She had vague ambitions to study musical theater, but when showbiz success didn’t fall into her lap, she took a series of 9-5 jobs that clearly bored her.

‘Oh, I’ve done a lot. I worked in an ice cream parlor. I worked as a delivery man, that was not for me. I worked for a cinematography company that did weddings, but it was under a lot of pressure because if I didn’t get something in the picture… At the end of the day I just didn’t feel a burning sensation in my stomach about any of them.”

It’s a curiously modern idea that without a burning feeling you’ve found your true calling, just leave your job. And it left Rae aimless; she lived for Friday night, reasoning that if she could earn enough for a single vacation, she would be fine.

‘I now understand what my father and mother meant. You have to have goals in life and work towards them. It’s not just about being materialistic.’

She has discovered a sense of focus, she says. So what does she want to focus on now? Her career as an influencer. hmm.

The irony is that all of the contestants achieved a huge head start in their pre-show goal of becoming social media personalities.

So is Rae ready for independent adulthood? She admits that she still has a way to go. Before coming to London for this piece, she stopped by to talk to her mother. “She printed out all my travel arrangements for me, made me an itinerary, and calculated all the trains.”

  • Snowflake Mountain came out on Netflix yesterday.

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