A new life cycle: the pride of the lions that will be killed is saved

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A pride of four lions that will be killed for their hides and bones have been rescued from an animal farm and given new homes.

Georges, Elma, Eva and Julie were taken from one of the legal lion farms in South Africa by the animal organization Wild at Life on Thursday.

The animals are thought to have lived in appalling conditions, while Georges spent four years alone in a cramped pen.

A pack of four lions who will be killed for their hides and bones have been rescued from an animal farm and given new homes

A pack of four lions who will be killed for their hides and bones have been rescued from an animal farm and given new homes

Georges, Elma, Eva and Julie were taken from one of the legal lion farms in South Africa by the animal organization Wild at Life on Thursday.

Georges, Elma, Eva and Julie were taken from one of the legal lion farms in South Africa by the animal organization Wild at Life on Thursday.

The animals are thought to have lived in appalling conditions, while Georges spent four years alone in a cramped pen

The animals are thought to have lived in appalling conditions, while Georges spent four years alone in a cramped pen

The farmers who locked up Georges reportedly waited for his mane to grow so that it looked ‘handsome enough’ for someone to pay up to £ 10,000 to shoot him like a trophy.

The execution is said to have taken place in his enclosed area, from which there would be no escape or chance to hide.

However, because Georges was born with a crooked tail, he was eventually excluded from this particular money-making option – and it was decided that he would instead be slaughtered for his bones.

According to Wild at Life, the lion bone trade is a lucrative and legal stream for farmers in South Africa and has emerged as an alternative to tiger bones for use in traditional Chinese medicine.

The animals were all lightly anesthetized before being gently lifted one at a time by a team of six and placed on their waiting transport.

The animals were all lightly anesthetized before being gently lifted one at a time by a team of six and placed on their waiting transport.

Georges was born with a crooked tail and it was decided that he would instead be slaughtered for his bones

Georges was born with a crooked tail and it was decided that he would be slaughtered for his bones instead

Charity founder Asli Han Gedik and her team oversaw the rescue of Georges and the three lionesses, Elma, Eva and Julie.

The animals were all lightly sedated before being gently lifted one at a time by a team of six people and placed in their waiting transport before traveling for five hours to their new home, where they all settled “ curiously but gently. ”

Julie got out of the trailer first and went to investigate and climb a tree – something she had never touched before.

“Our main mission is to combat the illegal wildlife trade and save the victims of poaching and canned hunting farms so they can live the peaceful, safe lives they deserve,” Asli Han Gedik told Jam Press.

To this end, our work to save lions bred to be shot will continue until there is none to be saved.

“Until they finally hit grass for the first time in their lives.” [sic]

The stunned animals traveled for five hours to their new home, where they have all settled

The stunned animals traveled for five hours to their new home, where they have all settled “curiously but gently.”

The animals are thought to have lived in terrible conditions with Georges spending four years alone in a cramped pen (photo)

The animals are thought to have lived in terrible conditions with Georges spending four years alone in a cramped pen (photo)

The Shrine of the Pride features numerous features found in their natural habitat, including tall grass to lounge in the sun and an array of acacia, jackalberry and marula trees to provide shade and enrichment.

Lions have interdigital glands, which they use on trees to transmit a scent when they bend their toes.

This aids in territorial marking and other types of olfactory messages to each other.

About 7,000 lions are believed to be held in small enclosures on South African lion farms.

“Thousands of farmed lions such as Georges, Eva, Elma and Julie are born into a life of squalor every year in brutal commercial breeding facilities,” Carly Åhlén, project director of Wild at Life, told Jam Press.

Earlier this month, South Africa announced that it will no longer breed lions in captivity, keep lions in captivity, or use captive lions or their derivatives commercially.

Charity founder Asli Han Gedik and her team oversaw the rescue of Georges and the three lionesses, Elma, Eva and Julie

Charity founder Asli Han Gedik and her team oversaw the rescue of Georges and the three lionesses, Elma, Eva and Julie

Georges, Eva, Elma and Julie will become symbols of hope in the campaign against lion breeding

Georges, Eva, Elma and Julie will become symbols of hope in the campaign against lion breeding

While this latest move by the government is brave, we must remember that this is just the beginning of a new battle.

Stakeholders such as the South African Predators Association will certainly face a legal challenge.

“If all goes well, we will have to work out other rules to ensure the well-being of the surviving lions.”

Georges, Eva, Elma and Julie will become symbols of hope in the campaign against lion breeding.

The foursome will live for the first time in their lives as part of a pride, free from the threat of a bullet.

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