A museum has gone to TikTok to show people what life was like in the UK

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A museum that has gone to TikTok to show people what life was like in the UK has made people’s stomachs churning – after sharing a clip of a typical lunch consisting of a cow stomach from 1899.

The Black Country Living Museum in Dudley, West Midlands, took to social media to share clips of actors looking to educate the younger generation about parts of the region’s history.

One clip shows a woman making her husband a traditional lunch of the time, consisting of cooked tripe and onions.

The woman cuts the cow’s stomach and vegetables into slices and cooks them together in a pan.

The Black Country Living Museum in Dudley, West Midlands, has gone to TikTok to show people what life was like in the UK – when a clip of an 1899 luncheon makes people’s stomachs turn (pictured)

The museum took to social media to share clips of actors as they shared parts of the region's history (pictured)

The museum took to social media to share clips of actors as they shared parts of the region’s history (pictured)

So that the man can take the food to work, the woman then puts the mixture in a bowl and wraps it in a cloth, before putting a spoonful of sugar, tea and condensed milk in a newspaper.

She writes him a note that reads, “Keep out the oss road yampy mon x,” which the actress further explains means “stay safe.”

The video, which has been viewed more than 4.2 million times, left many feeling nauseous.

In the comment section, one person wrote, “I think I’m going to get sick,” while a second wrote, “I’d be as skinny as I was alive then.”

A third added: “I would have starved to death because I couldn’t eat that.”

In the clip, the woman writes a note that reads: 'Keep out the oss road yampy mon x', which the actress says means 'stay safe'

In the clip, the woman writes a note that reads: ‘Keep out the oss road yampy mon x’, which the actress says means ‘stay safe’

In one clip, a woman makes her husband a traditional lunch of the era, which consisted of cooked tripe and onions, and TikTok users said they'd rather starve than eat it.

In one clip, a woman makes her husband a traditional lunch of the era, which consisted of cooked tripe and onions, and TikTok users said they’d rather starve than eat it.

The museum tells the story of one of the very first industrialized landscapes in Britain, with over forty reconstructed shops and houses.

The actors play characters who bring history to life by telling stories about what it was really like to live and work in this revolutionary period of history.

Social media users were also left hysterical over another video, in which an actor pretends to be a pharmacist helping women poison their husbands.

The caption on the clip reads: “Victorian pharmacists after a long day selling lethal doses of arsenic to angry housewives.”

To take the food to work, the woman puts the mixture in a bowl and wraps it in a cloth, before putting a spoonful of sugar, tea and condensed milk in a newspaper (photo)

To take the food to work, the woman puts the mixture in a bowl and wraps it in a cloth, before putting a spoonful of sugar, tea and condensed milk in a newspaper (photo)

Users were left hysterical with another video from the museum, in which an actor pretends to be a pharmacist helping women poison their husbands

Users were left hysterical with another video from the museum, in which an actor pretends to be a pharmacist helping women poison their husbands

People took to the clip's comment section to praise the account as

People took to the clip’s comment section to praise the account as “talented, funny and informative.”

The man jumps out of the pharmacy playing along to a slow song by Lana Del Rey and dances through the streets with his briefcase.

As he runs through the streets, men are leaning against the walls, coughing, while others are piled up on the sidewalk.

People took to the comment section to praise the account, with one calling it “talented, funny and informative.”

They wrote: ‘This is the BEST tiktok account. So creative, talented, fun, funny and informative,” while another wrote: “LMAO OMG THIS TOOK MY BREATH AWAY”.

In another short video, an actress explains how people in the Victorian era saved money on flour when baking bread by adding chalk to the ingredients, for example.

In another clip, an actress explains how people saved money on flour when baking bread by adding ideas like chalk to the ingredients

In another clip, an actress explains how people saved money on flour when baking bread by adding ideas like chalk to the ingredients

The actress looks like this standing in a replica house of the era, wearing a purple scarf draped over her shoulders and donning a simple dress

The actress looks like this standing in a replica house of the era, wearing a purple scarf draped over her shoulders and donning a simple dress

The man jumps out of the pharmacy as he plays along to a slow song by Lana Del Rey and dances through the streets with his briefcase

The man jumps out of the pharmacy as he plays along to a slow song by Lana Del Rey and dances through the streets with his briefcase

She says, ‘Did you know that a lot of the food that working-class Victorians ate was adulterated? Bread was a staple food in the Victorian period and was consumed before almost every meal.

“But most of the working-class Victorians who lived in back-to-backs like this didn’t have the time of facilities to bake their own bread from scratch.”

This is what the actress looks like standing in a replica house from that era, wearing a purple scarf draped over her shoulders and wearing a simple dress.

She adds: ‘So they depended on local bakers and shopkeepers to get their bread. The problem was that at every point in the supply chain, adulterants such as chalk, alum, gypsum or paris were added.

“These counterfeiters could build up to dangerous levels and leave an already impoverished population very malnourished. It can even have deadly consequences for babies.’

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