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A mother of two, 28, reveals how a hug with her son saved her life after she discovered a lump

A mother of two has revealed how a hug with her son saved her life after revealing a cancerous bump on her chest.

Emily Makin, from Wigan, raised her arms to hug Harrison, now three, when she saw a mass on her right breast last summer.

Initially thinking that it was only a symptom of her period, Mrs. Makin went to check the lump in case. A doctor immediately referred her for further tests.

Ms. Makin, 28, was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer only one week later – an aggressive form of the disease.

In the same month, Mrs. Makin, married to the 35-year-old AJ, had a breast amputation to remove her right breast and a 4.5 cm tumor.

Mrs. Makin revealed that she had had no other symptoms in the run-up to her diagnosis and that she was in top condition after she joined Slimming World and started running.

Emily Makin, 28, of Wigan, Greater Manchester, raised her arms to hug Harrison, three, when she saw a lump at the top of her right breast. It turned out to be an aggressive form of breast cancer. Pictured with her other son Freddie, two, during chemotherapy

Emily Makin, 28, of Wigan, Greater Manchester, raised her arms to hug Harrison, three, when she saw a lump at the top of her right breast. It turned out to be an aggressive form of breast cancer. Pictured with her other son Freddie, two, during chemotherapy

After a series of tests, Ms Makin received a triple negative diagnosis of breast cancer in July 2018. On the photo, during chemotherapy with a wig

After a series of tests, Ms Makin received a triple negative diagnosis of breast cancer in July 2018. On the photo, during chemotherapy with a wig

After a series of tests, Ms Makin received a triple negative diagnosis of breast cancer in July 2018. On the photo, during chemotherapy with a wig

Mrs. Makin had no symptoms in the run-up and that summer, from 2018, and was recently married to AJ a few months earlier

Mrs. Makin had no symptoms in the run-up and that summer, from 2018, and was recently married to AJ a few months earlier

Mrs. Makin had no symptoms in the run-up and that summer, from 2018, and was recently married to AJ a few months earlier

Mrs. Makin was in top condition before her diagnosis, which was a shock

Mrs. Makin was in top condition before her diagnosis, which was a shock

Mrs. Makin was in top condition before her diagnosis, which was a shock

About the hug she had with her son, Mrs. Makin, a full-time mother, she said: “I raised my arms to hug my son and saw it.

“I had just finished my period, so at first I thought it could be hormonal and related to it.

“But it nagged at me. It was not something I wanted to leave, so a few days later I made an appointment for an emergency doctor.

“They once told me [the diagnosis] I just wanted to go somewhere and scream to let everything out. I was very angry, very “why me?” But when that was over, I realized I had to fight. ”

Mrs. Makin, who also has a son Freddie, two, told how, prior to her diagnosis, she saw no signs of what was to come.

Instead, she felt fitter and healthier than in years before everything changed that day in July 2018.

After visiting her doctor, Mrs. Makin was immediately referred to a breast clinic where she had undergone tests, including a core biopsy – where a needle is passed through the skin to take a tissue sample from a mass or lump.

Mrs. Makin said: “It was at the point of the mammogram that my thoughts began to go:” This is not right. ” I knew something serious was happening. “

About a week later, Mrs. Makin was recalled for the results, which unfortunately confirmed her worst fears.

Mrs. Makin, pictured with her sons during the treatment, went to the doctors while the lump, which she thought might be a side effect of her period, played in her mind

Mrs. Makin, pictured with her sons during treatment, went to the doctors while the lump, which she thought might be a side effect of her period, played in her mind

Mrs. Makin, pictured with her sons during the treatment, went to the doctors while the lump, which she thought might be a side effect of her period, played in her mind

Mrs. Makin had a breast amputation the same month as her diagnosis, removing her right breast and the 4.5 cm tumor, followed by chemotherapy (photo) and radiotherapy

Mrs. Makin had a breast amputation the same month as her diagnosis, removing her right breast and the 4.5 cm tumor, followed by chemotherapy (photo) and radiotherapy

Mrs. Makin had a breast amputation the same month as her diagnosis, removing her right breast and the 4.5 cm tumor, followed by chemotherapy (photo) and radiotherapy

Mrs. Makin decided to shave her head instead of waiting for her hair to fall out as a result of the treatment. On the photo after her radiotherapy was finished

Mrs. Makin decided to shave her head instead of waiting for her hair to fall out as a result of the treatment. On the photo after her radiotherapy was finished

Mrs. Makin decided to shave her head instead of waiting for her hair to fall out as a result of the treatment. On the photo after her radiotherapy was finished

She said, “A doctor and a nurse came to me and I remember seeing a breast cancer leaflet in the nurse’s pocket and realizing what was coming.

“I can’t blame the doctor, he was absolutely beautiful. He sat down and looked straight at me and said, “I’m really sorry, but it’s breast cancer.”

“Then the tears began to pour down my face. I just wanted to come home with AJ and the boys and lock myself up from the world.

“There was a lot of talk about what it all meant and what would happen, but I couldn’t handle anything. I had only heard the word cancer. “

Triple negative breast cancer is a rare breast cancer that occurs in about one in five women with breast cancer. It is more common in women younger than 40 and in black women.

Every year 55,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK – 150 cases per day. Figures show that about 270,000 cases happen in the US every year.

On July 19, Ms. Makin had her first round of treatment, a single breast amputation, at Royal Albert Edward Infirmary in Wigan.

She said: “That was an easy decision for me to make. I was adamant, I wanted it because I just wanted the cancer to disappear and I felt that I was getting better.

“I wasn’t attached to my breasts. They had done their job, fed my children – I didn’t need them.

“I knew AJ wouldn’t care what I looked like either. He is so good and supportive. ”

Speaking of her breast amputation, Mrs. Makin, pictured during chemo, said: “I was not attached to my breasts. They had done their job, fed my children – I didn’t need them. I knew AJ [pictured] I also didn’t care what I looked like. He is so good and supportive ‘

Speaking of her diagnosis, Mrs. Makin, pictured at the end of her hospital chemotherapy, said, “I couldn’t handle anything. I only heard the word cancer ‘

Mrs. Makin no longer receives treatment and is now waiting for a mammogram to determine whether or not she is in remission. Pictured early 2019

Mrs. Makin no longer receives treatment and is now waiting for a mammogram to determine whether or not she is in remission. Pictured early 2019

Mrs. Makin no longer receives treatment and is now waiting for a mammogram to determine whether or not she is in remission. Pictured early 2019

Mrs. Makin took control of her hair during chemotherapy and said: “First I shaved half of it and colored it pink, then I went for a purple mohawk before I finally became a green skinhead”

Then Mrs. Makin received chemotherapy from September to December.

She wanted to take back some control and decided to shave her head instead of waiting for her blonde locks to fall out as a result of the treatment.

Mrs. Makin said: “It was all I had control over. Cancer did not take that away from me either.

‘First I shaved half of it and colored it pink, then I went for a purple mohawk before finally becoming a green skinhead.

“So much happened that it was really important for me to hold on to those little moments of positivity.”

After ending chemotherapy on December 28, Ms. Makin then received radiotherapy from January to February 18, to ensure that all cancer cells were gone.

She no longer receives treatment and is now waiting for a mammogram to determine whether or not she is in remission.

Mrs. Makin, who blogged during her trip, is currently preparing to run the Race For Life on May 22 to raise money for Cancer Research UK.

She said, “I would run all the time before my diagnosis threw me in a whirlwind, and was really keen to get back to it, so I started a week to 5 km program a week after stopping chemotherapy.

“I don’t want people to be paranoid, but to be aware of changes in their bodies and how they can check themselves for nodules.

“I never thought this would happen to me, especially not so young, so I hope my story can help others.”

Mrs. Makin supports Race for Life in collaboration with Tesco. Join your local event at www.raceforlife.org.

Mrs. Makin is currently preparing to run the Race For Life on May 22 to raise money for Cancer Research UK

Mrs. Makin is currently preparing to run the Race For Life on May 22 to raise money for Cancer Research UK

Mrs. Makin is currently preparing to run the Race For Life on May 22 to raise money for Cancer Research UK

HOW TO CHECK YOUR BREASTS

What should you pay attention to?

  • Changes in the skin texture, for example folds / dimples

This is why it is so important to feel your breasts AND look at you. Dimples in the skin and wrinkles can resemble orange peels

  • Swelling in your armpit or around your collarbone

It is important not only to check your breasts, but also your upper chest and armpit, as these areas also contain breast tissue

This is fluid that comes out of the nipple without squeezing it

  • A sudden, unusual change in shape or form

Most women naturally have a boob larger than the others or experience that their breasts gradually change as they age.

Many changes are completely normal, but if you notice a sudden, unusual change in size or shape, have it checked

  • Nipple inversion and changes in direction

All this means that your nipple is pulled into the boob or looks different than normal. This can be a change in position or form. That is why it is important to pay special attention to your nipple during your regular checks

  • A rash or scab of the nipple or environment

There are many reasons why your skin may become irritated, especially if you are breastfeeding, but if you notice redness or rash on the skin and / or around the nipple or crust of the nipple, make sure you check it out with your doctor

What to feel

Some breasts are lumpy by nature and this can be completely normal. The key is to know how your breasts feel so that you would notice if new lumps appear or if your breasts feel thicker in an area compared to the rest

  • Constant, unusual pain in your chest or armpit

Some chest pain can be completely normal, especially around your period. But keep an eye out for inexplicable pain in your chest or armpit that is almost always there

Source: CoppaFeel!

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