Advertisements
The beekeeper of Brisbane, Paul Wood, was called in to remove 70,000 insects and buried a huge amount of honeycomb deep in the beams of the property on Tuesday

Homeowner shock as a huge two-meter-long beehive with 70,000 insects and 15kg of honey inside is found in their ceiling

  • Homeowners remained baffled when they discovered a two-meter hive
  • Paul Wood beekeeper from Brisbane was hired to remove the 70,000 insects
  • He estimated that the bees had built the hive for about two years
  • Mr Wood managed to squeeze out about 10-15 kg of honey from the hive
Advertisements

Homeowners remained astonished when they discovered a two-meter-long hive in their ceiling.

The Brisbane beekeeper, Paul Wood, was called in to bury Tuesday 70,000 insects and a huge amount of honeycomb deep in the beams of the property.

& # 39; I am exhausted, it was more than five hours of work and it was a very difficult task & # 39 ;, Wood told Daily Mail Australia.

Scroll down for video

Advertisements

The beekeeper of Brisbane, Paul Wood, was called in to remove 70,000 insects and buried a huge amount of honeycomb deep in the beams of the property on Tuesday

The beekeeper of Brisbane, Paul Wood, was called in to remove 70,000 insects and buried a huge amount of honeycomb deep in the beams of the property on Tuesday

The homeowners were unaware of the beehive nestled in the ceiling of their living room because the bees had entered through an opening in the side of the building

The homeowners were unaware of the beehive nestled in the ceiling of their living room because the bees had entered through an opening in the side of the building

The homeowners were unaware of the beehive nestled in the ceiling of their living room because the bees had entered through an opening in the side of the building

& # 39; This was difficult because the beams were very close and the floor cavity was very deep – quite unusual. The comb was quite long, it contained around 10-15 kg of honey

He estimated that the bees had built the hive for about two years.

The homeowners were unaware of the beehive nestled in the ceiling of their living room because the bees had entered through an opening in the side of the building.

Advertisements

& # 39; It was fairly quiet in the house, the most important sign being bees coming and going from outside, & # 39; said Mr. Wood.

Wood said that the process of removing the bees is done very carefully and specifically to not hurt them.

& # 39; I use a thermal camera to find the hive and the hot part of the hive, the hot part of the beehives is where the queen lives, & # 39; he said.

Wood said his first priority is to ensure that the queen bee is safe.

& # 39; I then cut the ceiling to expose the hive and vacuum the bees, & # 39; he said.

Advertisements

& # 39; Each beehive has a personality, I like to work nice and slow, slow is the best. I try not to use smoke, I usually get a stitch or two, but you just play the game. & # 39;

Wood said the process to remove the bees was done very carefully and specifically to not hurt them (photo: the hole he had to cut to remove the bees)

Wood said the process to remove the bees was done very carefully and specifically to not hurt them (photo: the hole he had to cut to remove the bees)

Wood said the process to remove the bees was done very carefully and specifically to not hurt them (photo: the hole he had to cut to remove the bees)

Me Wood said it is very common to have hives in homes because they have difficulty finding trees to live in.

& # 39; There are not many trees planting and we are cutting too many. It is a mistake that we continue to reduce them, and there is no natural alternative. & # 39;

Advertisements

He said that when the temperature starts to rise, people can expect more bees to buzz around.

In August, Mr Wood was called for a similar position in Bracken Ridge, north of Brisbane.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news (t) Brisbane