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Doris Stauffer, 73, died in hospice care five years ago after a battle of Alzheimer's for several years, despite doctors saying she did not carry the disease gene
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An Arizona man talked about his heartache when he heard that his mother's body, which he donated to a medical research center, had actually been sold to the army and puffed up in an experiment with & # 39; explosion tests & # 39 ;.

Doris Stauffer, 73, died in hospice care five years ago after struggling with Alzheimer's for several years, despite doctors saying she didn't carry the disease gene.

Medical officials feared that the condition might have mutated and hoped to study her brain after her death for further investigation.

However, when she died in 2014, her neurologist was unable to accept her remains, so her son, Jim, contacted a number of donation facilities that he hoped would continue the investigation.

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He eventually settled at the Biological Resource Center (BRC) in Maricopa County on the recommendation of a nurse, under the agreement that the company – led by Stephen Gore – would send her brain to a neurological research group.

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Doris Stauffer, 73, died in hospice care five years ago after a battle of Alzheimer's for several years, despite doctors saying she did not carry the disease gene

Doris Stauffer, 73, died in hospice care five years ago after a battle of Alzheimer's for several years, despite doctors saying she did not carry the disease gene

However, when she died in 2014, her neurologist was unable to accept her remains, so her son, Jim (above), contacted a number of other donation facilities that he hoped would be investigating his mother's condition continue. He eventually settled at the Biological Resource Center (BRC) in Maricopa County

However, when she died in 2014, her neurologist was unable to accept her remains, so her son, Jim (above), contacted a number of other donation facilities that he hoped would be investigating his mother's condition continue. He eventually settled at the Biological Resource Center (BRC) in Maricopa County

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However, when she died in 2014, her neurologist was unable to accept her remains, so her son, Jim (above), contacted a number of other donation facilities that he hoped would be investigating his mother's condition continue. He eventually settled at the Biological Resource Center (BRC) in Maricopa County

"I feel foolish," said Jim Stauffer FOX6, get to know the true fate of his mother's remains. & # 39; Because I am not a trusting person, but in this situation you have no idea that this is going on – you trust. I think trust is what they were doing. & # 39;

Jim remembered how a BRC official came to collect his mother's remains within 45 minutes of her death.

There he said that he had signed an agreement with the official detailing what would and would not happen to Doris.

A few days later, he received a wooden box that the & # 39; majority & # 39; of his mother's ashes, but no information was provided on how Doris's body was used or where the rest of her remains were.

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It would be another three years before he heard what had really happened to his mother when a Reuters reporter sent him a series of documents.

The data showed that BRC employees detached one of Doris Stauffer's hands for cremation. After returning that ashes to her son, the company sold and sent the rest of Stauffer's body – including her brain – to a taxpayer-funded US Army research project.

Doris's cadaver was then tied to a chair on "a sort of device" and an explosive device was lit under her.

The idea of ​​the experiment was to get an idea of ​​what the human body is going through when a vehicle is hit by an IED, the documents are detailed.

Jim remembered how a BRC official came to collect his mother's remains within 45 minutes of her death. A few days later, he received a wooden box that the & # 39; majority & # 39; of his mother's ashes, but no information was provided on how Doris's body was used or where the rest of her remains were

Jim remembered how a BRC official came to collect his mother's remains within 45 minutes of her death. A few days later, he received a wooden box that the & # 39; majority & # 39; of his mother's ashes, but no information was provided on how Doris's body was used or where the rest of her remains were

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Jim remembered how a BRC official came to collect his mother's remains within 45 minutes of her death. A few days later he received a wooden box with the & # 39; majority & # 39; of his mother's ashes, but no information was provided on how Doris's body was used or where the rest of her remains were

It would be another three years before he heard what had really happened to his mother when a Reuters reporter sent him a series of documents. The data showed that BRC employees detached one of Doris Stauffer's hands for cremation. After returning that ashes to her son, the company sold and sent the rest of Stauffer's body - including her brain - to a taxpayer-funded US Army research project

It would be another three years before he heard what had really happened to his mother when a Reuters reporter sent him a series of documents. The data showed that BRC employees detached one of Doris Stauffer's hands for cremation. After returning that ashes to her son, the company sold and sent the rest of Stauffer's body - including her brain - to a taxpayer-funded US Army research project

It would be another three years before he heard what had really happened to his mother when a Reuters reporter sent him a series of documents. The data showed that BRC employees detached one of Doris Stauffer's hands for cremation. After returning that ashes to her son, the company sold the rest of Stauffer's & her body – including her brain – to a taxpayer-funded US Army research project

"There was actually a word in these papers about doing things like this," Jim said. "Conducting these medical tests with possible explosions, and we said no. We have all checked the & # 39; no & # 39; box there. & # 39;

BRC and military data show that at least 20 other bodies were also used in the explosion experiments without the consent of the donors or their family members.

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The donated bodies were all sold to the army for $ 5,893 each. Project officials said they never received the consent forms from the donors or their families, along with the cadavers.

Instead, they were forced to rely on BRC's guarantees that the families or donors had all agreed to be used in the specified type of study.

Jim says he is still struggling with the reality of the creepy end of his mother's remains, and added that his memories of her are regularly plagued by visions of the experiment.

"I see no way to ever come by," he said. "Every time there is a memory, every time there is a photo that you look at, there is this ugly thing that happened right there and was staring right at you."

Doris's carcass was then tied up in a chair on some sort of device and an explosive exploded under her

Doris's carcass was then tied up in a chair on some sort of device and an explosive exploded under her

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Doris's carcass was then tied to a chair on & # 39; a kind of device & # 39; and an explosive exploded under her

The idea of ​​the experiment was to get an idea of ​​what the human body goes through when a vehicle is hit by an IED¿

The idea of ​​the experiment was to get an idea of ​​what the human body goes through when a vehicle is hit by an IED¿

The idea of ​​the experiment was to get & # 39; an idea of ​​what the human body is going through when a vehicle is hit by an IED & # 39;

Jim is one of the 33 plaintiffs in a lawsuit against BRC and his owner Stephen Gore, comparing the horrific details of how the center abuses the bodies of loved ones with the horror novel Frankenstein.

Gore, 52, was found guilty of running an illegal business in 2015 after it was discovered that he had sold body parts.

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More than 1,755 human body parts were found in the facility, which required 142 body bags to move and weighed 10 tons, according to Reuters.

In a statement for the new lawsuit, former FBI agent Mark Cwynar described several disturbing scenes & # 39; at the Phoenix location.

Cwynar told about the head of a little woman sewn on a large male torso that was in a & # 39; Frankenstein way & # 39; hung on the wall. Its placement was described as & # 39; an apparent morbid joke & # 39 ;.

He also talked about a & # 39; cooler box filled with male genitals & # 39 ;, & # 39; infected heads & # 39; and & # 39; bucket with heads, arms and legs & # 39; without identification labels.

There was also blood and body fluid on the bottom of the freezer.

Researchers found the small head of a woman sewn on a large male torso that was used in a & # 39; Frankenstein way & # 39; hung on a wall. Body parts are removed from the site above
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Researchers found the small head of a woman sewn on a large male torso that was used in a & # 39; Frankenstein way & # 39; hung on a wall. Body parts are removed from the site above

A lawsuit filed against the Biological Resource Center in Phoenix, Arizona, claims that the body donation clinic has misled families and abused the bodies of their loved ones. During the raid on the center (above), an FBI agent said more than 1,755 human body parts were found

The FBI and police looted the site in 2014 as part of a multi-state investigation into illegal trade and sale of human body parts

The FBI and police looted the site in 2014 as part of a multi-state investigation into illegal trade and sale of human body parts

The FBI and police looted the site in 2014 as part of a multi-state investigation into illegal trade and sale of human body parts

The first raids in 2014 took place as part of a multi-state investigation into the illegal trade in and sale of human body parts.

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The BRC picked up the bodies of deceased loved ones from family homes, and from there they sold the parts to intermediaries for profit.

The bodies were cut with the help of chainsaws and band saws, tools that should not be used when dismantling carcasses.

There was even a price list for body parts, including an entire upper body for $ 4,000, an intact torso for $ 2,900, a back for $ 1,900, a leg from mid-thigh to toe tip for $ 600, a head for $ 500 and a knee for $ 375.

A complete, intact body can cost anywhere between $ 5,000 and $ 10,000.

After the investigation, business owner Gore pleaded guilty in October 2015 to federal allegations of running an illegal company.

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He admitted that the bodies were not being used in a way permitted by donors and that he & # 39; overwhelmed & # 39; was in an industry without regulation.

His wife, children, and siblings argued for a mild punishment, which described him as a & # 39; family man & # 39 ;, Fox 10 Phoenix reported.

Owner Stephen Gore admitted that he & # 39; opener & # 39; could have been about what would happen after bodies were donated. Pictured: Gore with his wife and daughters

Owner Stephen Gore admitted that he & # 39; opener & # 39; could have been about what would happen after bodies were donated. Pictured: Gore with his wife and daughters

Owner Stephen Gore admitted that he & # 39; opener & # 39; could have been about what would happen after bodies were donated. Pictured: Gore with his wife and daughters

A screenshot of a 2013 training video from the BRC shows a construction saw used by technicians to remove a man's spine.

A screenshot of a 2013 training video from the BRC shows a construction saw used by technicians to remove a man's spine.

A screenshot of a 2013 training video from the BRC shows a construction saw used by technicians to remove a man's spine.

Gore has no more than a high school diploma, nor any licenses or certifications that apply to operations of the body donation program. Pictured: Gore, on the right, with his wife and three children

Gore has no more than a high school diploma, nor any licenses or certifications that apply to operations of the body donation program. Pictured: Gore, on the right, with his wife and three children

Gore has no more than a high school diploma, nor any licenses or certifications that apply to operations of the body donation program. Pictured: Gore, on the right, with his wife and three children

Gore was sentenced in 2015 to a one-year suspended prison sentence, suspended for four years, and forced to repay $ 121,000.

& # 39; I could have been more open about the donation process in the brochure that we put publicly & # 39 ;, said Gore, AZ Central said.

His highest level of education is high school, and he is said to have received no permits or certifications that apply to operations of the body donation program.

DailyMail.com could only find a license that Gore received as an insurance agent in the state of Florida for Gore & Associates Insurance Services LLC.

Gore has been contacted by DailyMail.com for comment, but has not responded.

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