A dog sucker was & # 39; shocked & # 39; left behind when he found a 2800-year-old skull on the beach

A dog sucker was shocked & # 39; & # 39; left behind when he realized that & # 39; football & # 39; that he had shot on the beach on the Isle of Wight was actually a 2800-year-old skull

  • The dog walk found the skull on a beach at Binstead on the Isle of Wight
  • It was found by Anthony Plowright who initially thought it was an old football
  • The remains are dated between 800BC and 540BC – the Iron Age
  • The only thing left of the person is the upper part of the skull that is called the skull
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Kicking an image of what you thought was part of an old football during a walk on the beach – only to discover that it was actually part of a human skull.

That's what happened to Anthony Plowright.

He walked with his two dogs on the beach at Binstead on the Isle of Wight when he discovered what turned out to be the upper part of a human skull called the skull.

The coroner's office on Isle of Wight sent the dark brown remains to carbon dating and discovered it was around 2,800 years old.

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The skull, pictured here, belonged to someone who would have lived in the Iron Age, or according to the Isle of Wight coroners office about 2,800 years ago

The skull, pictured here, belonged to someone who would have lived in the Iron Age, or according to the Isle of Wight coroners office about 2,800 years ago

The only thing left of the person was the upper part of the skull called the skull - seen in this photo of the coroner of the Isle of Wight

The only thing left of the person was the upper part of the skull called the skull - seen in this photo of the coroner of the Isle of Wight

The only thing left of the person was the upper part of the skull called the skull – seen in this photo of the coroner of the Isle of Wight

The skull was discovered on June 4, 2018, but the Isle of Wight Coroner, Caroline Sumeray, has just released her findings.

The carbon dating states that the skull belongs to someone who would have lived in the early Iron Age – between about 800 BC. And 540 BC.

Mr. Plowright said: “I thought it was part of an old football when I first saw it, so I booted it over the beach. I soon realized it wasn't a ball.

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& # 39; I put it in a bag and took it home and emailed the police to tell them I found it. & # 39;

& # 39; I had absolutely no idea it was that old. & # 39;

The skull was discovered on a beach near Binstead in the north of the Isle of Wight by a man who walked his two dogs in the evening

The skull was discovered on a beach near Binstead in the north of the Isle of Wight by a man who walked his two dogs in the evening

The skull was discovered on a beach near Binstead in the north of the Isle of Wight by a man who walked his two dogs in the evening

The skull is donated to the Isle of Wight Museum Service who says they are looking forward to studying it.

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During the Iron Age, the people of the Isle of Wight were already trading via maritime links with nearby communities.

& # 39; Recent discoveries suggest that the inhabitants of the Isle of Wight have carried out a broader maritime activity within the Solent from prehistoric times, & quot; said Stephanie Smith of the British Museum.

& # 39; In the Iron Age and Roman times, the island was part of an extensive maritime network of interaction between Southern Great Britain and the continent, extending as far as the Mediterranean Sea. & # 39;

The skull - in the photo - is donated to the Isle of Wight Museum Service who says they are looking forward to studying it

The skull - in the photo - is donated to the Isle of Wight Museum Service who says they are looking forward to studying it

The skull – in the photo – is donated to the Isle of Wight Museum Service who says they are looking forward to studying it

WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT IRON TIME BRITTANNIA?

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The Iron Age in Britain began around 800 BC and ended in 43AD when the Bronze Age began.

As the name suggested, this period changed on a large scale thanks to the introduction of ironwork technology.

The population of Great Britain probably exceeded one million during this period.

This was made possible by new forms of agriculture, such as the introduction of new varieties of barley and wheat.

The invention of the iron plow made it possible for the first time to cultivate crops in heavy clay soils.

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Some of the most important advances during the introduction were the introduction of the potter's wheel, the lathe (used for woodworking) and rotating quern for grinding grain.

There are nearly 3000 Iron Age forts in the UK. Some were used as permanent settlements, others were used as locations for meetings, trade and religious activities.

At that time, most people lived in small farms with extended families.

The standard house was a round house made of wood or stone with a thatched or peat roof.

Funeral practices were varied, but it seems that most people were removed by & # 39; excarnation & # 39; – meaning that they were intentionally exposed.

There are also some marsh bodies from this period that show the evidence of violent deaths in the form of ritual and sacrificial deaths.

By the end of this period there was increasing Roman influence from the western Mediterranean and southern France.

It seems that before the Roman conquest of England in 43AD they had already made contact with many tribes and could have exerted some political influence.

After 43AD, the whole of Wales and England became part of the Roman Empire under the wall of Hadrian, while the Iron Age life in Scotland and Ireland lasted longer.

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