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Payton Hayes, five, from Sebring, Florida, was diagnosed when he was born with craniosynostosis, a birth defect where the bones of the skull fuse together before the brain is fully formed. Pictured: Payton is gifted with his custom made doll

A five-year-old boy from Florida who has undergone multiple operations, received a custom-made doll that had the same surgical scars as he did.

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Payton Haynes, from Sebring, has undergone two skull operations due to two different neurological disorders that left him with scars on his skull and on his lower abdomen.

His mother, Kristin Hayes, told Good morning America she wanted her son to see a doll that looked the same, because there was no toy on the market that looked like him.

After hearing this, students from the nearby Cracker Trail Elementary School contacted a non-profit organization that was able to make a doll with the same scars in the same places as Payton.

Payton Hayes, five, from Sebring, Florida, was diagnosed when he was born with craniosynostosis, a birth defect where the bones of the skull fuse together before the brain is fully formed. Pictured: Payton is gifted with his custom made doll

Payton Hayes, five, from Sebring, Florida, was diagnosed when he was born with craniosynostosis, a birth defect where the bones of the skull fuse together before the brain is fully formed. Pictured: Payton is gifted with his custom made doll

He had his first surgery when he was three months old. Last year, Payton had a second operation after being diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition where an accumulation of brain fluid occurred in the brain. On the photo: Payton with his customized doll

He had his first surgery when he was three months old. Last year, Payton had a second operation after being diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition where an accumulation of brain fluid occurred in the brain. On the photo: Payton with his customized doll

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He had his first surgery when he was three months old. Last year, Payton had a second operation after being diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition where an accumulation of brain fluid occurred in the brain. On the photo: Payton with his customized doll

When Payton was born, he was diagnosed with craniosynostosis, a birth defect where the bones of the skull fuse together before the brain is fully formed.

Surgery is needed to correct the shape of the head so that the brain can grow well.

His mother told Good Morning America that he had his first surgery when he was barely three months old.

More recently, last year, he was diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which there is an accumulation of brain fluid in the brain.

In December he underwent a nine-hour operation so that doctors could insert a shunt.

The operations started with a five-centimeter scar on the back of his skull and a scar on his stomach, Good Morning America reported.

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The idea for a similar doll came after the second grade students of the Cracker Trail primary school and her class raised $ 500 for fundraising.

& # 39; In the past, we have donated to The Humane Society, the children's museum, so we took a vote in class about what we are going to do this year & # 39 ;, Professor Liz Prendergast told DailyMail.com.

The class decided to donate to a child with a severe disease.

The two operations have left Payton (photo) with scars on his skull and on his stomach

The two operations have left Payton (photo) with scars on his skull and on his stomach

Students from a nearby primary school raised money and decided that they wanted to donate part of the money to the Payton family

Students from a nearby primary school raised money and decided that they wanted to donate part of the money to the Payton family

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The two operations left Payton (pictured, left and right) with scars on his skull and on his lower abdomen. Students from a nearby primary school raised money and decided that they wanted to donate part of the money to the Payton family

The school contacted Amy Jandrisevits, who runs a non-profit organization that makes custom dolls. Despite her long waiting list, she committed to make the doll in one weekend. Pictured: Payton with the doll by appointment of a doctor

The school contacted Amy Jandrisevits, who runs a non-profit organization that makes custom dolls. Despite her long waiting list, she committed to make the doll in one weekend. Pictured: Payton with the doll by appointment of a doctor

The school contacted Amy Jandrisevits, who runs a non-profit organization that makes custom dolls. Despite her long waiting list, she committed to make the doll in one weekend. Pictured: Payton with the doll by appointment of a doctor

Prendergast reached out to the charity Champions for Children, who brought them into contact with two families, one of them was Payton & # 39; s.

& # 39; I spoke with Kristin, Payton's mother, and we said we liked the idea of ​​buying something and giving it to the child, & # 39; said Prendergast.

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& # 39; And she said, "You know, a doll was made by a woman I followed on Facebook and if he could share it with his friends and show the scars of the doll and do it with a doll that would be so cool ". & # 39;

That woman was Amy Jandrisevits, who runs a non-profit organization, Doll Like Me, who makes custom dolls.

Jandrisevits told Prendergast that she had a long waiting list, but after hearing the Payton story, she decided to make the doll in one weekend.

The mother of the three spent six to seven hours at her dining room table before sending the doll to the school last night.

& # 39; This is a major problem, and I think these children have had a great lesson in empathy, & # 39; Jandrisevits told DailyMail.com.

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& # 39; It's such a great lesson for these kids. You cannot vote, you have no decisions in your medical care, but you can make something else in the life of another child. & # 39;

On Friday, the second-class class presented Payton with the doll (pictured, with Payton in orange), which he called Little Payton.

On Friday, the second-class class presented Payton with the doll (pictured, with Payton in orange), which he called Little Payton.

On Friday, the second-class class presented Payton with the doll (pictured, with Payton in orange), which he called Little Payton.

Payton's mother says he plans to use the doll to explain his scars to classmates and takes the doll to doctor's appointments. Pictured: Payton, center, with his family

Payton's mother says he plans to use the doll to explain his scars to classmates and takes the doll to doctor's appointments. Pictured: Payton, center, with his family

Payton's mother says he plans to use the doll to explain his scars to classmates and takes the doll to doctor's appointments. Pictured: Payton, center, with his family

On Friday, the class presented Payton with the doll, which he called Little Payton.

& # 39; I was really nervous because I told him we were giving him a gift and he asked: & # 39; Are you giving me a dinosaur? & # 39; & # 39; Said Prendergast.

& # 39; But when he saw it, he said: & # 39; He looks like me, he has my scar! & # 39; It didn't look like him, but he knew what that meant to see the scars and that is personal to him. It gives me cold shivers. & # 39;

Jandrisevits, who made the doll, said Payton's mother told her he would take the doll with her wherever she went, even to doctor's appointments.

& # 39; When I make dolls, nine out of ten times, I name them (children) by themselves or by a version of their name, & # 39; she said.

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& # 39; They really look into the face of a doll and want to see their own face. We cannot underestimate how important that is. & # 39;

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