A 35-foot tree branch fell on a tourist in Washington Square Park who broke her skull and backbone

A tree-length of 35 feet falls on a tourist in Washington Square Park in New York City, breaking her skull and backbone while sitting on a bench with her son

  • Penny Chang, 55, was hit by a falling tree branch in Washington Square Park
  • The blow of the branch broke her skull and backbone and opened her head
  • Chang was sitting on a bench with her son, Jacob, 19 years old, on the west side of the park in Greenwich Village when she was hit on Monday around 7:40 am
  • At Bellevue Hospital a change was made to critical but stable condition
  • Officials said a fungal disease called Massaria may have caused the limbs to die
  • Jacob was not injured and Chang was on the list in stable condition on Tuesday

A 35-meter-long tree trunk injured a Virginia tourist who visited Washington Square Park in New York City on Monday.

The limb fell from a plane tree in Washington Square Park and shattered the skull and backbone of Penny Chang, 55, who was in town with her 19-year-old son, Jacob.

Chang was taken to Bellevue Hospital, where she was classified as stable but critical on Tuesday, CBS News reported.

Last year a woman prosecuted the city for $ 200 million after a tree with rotting roots fell on her and her three children walking through Central Park, DailyMail.com reported earlier.

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A 35-foot tree branch (pictured) fell and injured Penny Chang, 55, a Virginia tourist who sat on a bench with her 19-year-old son Jacob in Washington Square Park in New York City on Monday

A 35-foot tree branch (pictured) fell and injured Penny Chang, 55, a Virginia tourist who sat on a bench with her 19-year-old son Jacob in Washington Square Park in New York City on Monday

Officials said the limbs may have fallen due to infection with Massaria, a fungal disease

Officials said the limbs may have fallen due to infection with Massaria, a fungal disease

Officials said the limbs may have fallen due to infection with Massaria, a fungal disease

Monday, in the Greenwich Village district of Lower Manhattan, Chang was beaten while sitting on a bench on the west side of Washington Square Park around 7:40 PM Eastern.

Her son, who was sitting next to her, was not injured, the authorities said.

The New York City Parks Department released a statement on Tuesday with a possible explanation for the fallen limbs.

& # 39; This morning's preliminary inspection indicates that the tree is showing signs of having Massaria, a fungus, which may cause the limb to stop working & # 39 ;, the agency said.

& # 39; We will conduct further inspections of the tree and surrounding trees and will address them accordingly. & # 39;

The branch broke Chang's skull and backbone and left a cut in the back of her head when it crashed on her around 7:40 am, east on Monday, on the west side of Washington Square Park (main body shown)

The branch broke Chang's skull and backbone and left a cut in the back of her head when it crashed on her around 7:40 am, east on Monday, on the west side of Washington Square Park (main body shown)

The branch broke Chang's skull and backbone and left a cut in the back of her head when it crashed on her around 7:40 am, east on Monday, on the west side of Washington Square Park (main body shown)

Her son, who was sitting next to her on the couch (see photo), was not injured, the authorities said

Her son, who was sitting next to her on the couch (see photo), was not injured, the authorities said

Her son, who was sitting next to her on the couch (see photo), was not injured, the authorities said

Massaria is a fungal disease that infects trees, especially trees that are more than 40 years old, according to Woodland Trust, a UK forest protection charity.

The disease usually does not affect the overall health of the tree, but causes limbs to die and fall.

Smaller branches infected with Massaria can die within a year after showing signs, including dead flaking bark with visible orange sapwood, although branches can decay and fall as quickly as within a few months of infection.

It is more difficult to recognize Massaria in large branches, because the bark tends to die off at the top.

The tree from which the limbs fell was last inspected by the city in November 2016 and June 2017, every time it was listed as being in reasonable condition, the City Parks department said.

It was last pruned a month later, in August 2017.

It is not known how old the tree is at the moment.

The tree from which the limbs fell was last inspected by the city in November 2016 and June 2017, every time it was listed as in reasonable condition, the City Parks department said. It was last pruned a month later, in August 2017

The tree from which the limbs fell was last inspected by the city in November 2016 and June 2017, every time it was listed as being in reasonable condition, the City Parks department said. It was last pruned a month later, in August 2017

The tree from which the limbs fell was last inspected by the city in November 2016 and June 2017, every time it was listed as being in reasonable condition, the City Parks department said. It was last pruned a month later, in August 2017

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