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A 20-year-old Florida woman developed an ovarian tumor the size of an exercise ball

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A 20-year-old woman from Florida developed an ovarian cyst the size of an exercise ball that was removed from her abdomen.

Allison Fisher, of Jacksonville, said the lump was so large that she felt like she was pregnant with 10 children and could no longer bend over or see her feet.

She regularly had stomach pains, bloating, and even had a period that lasted for a whole year. But this Florida native put off visiting doctors, fearing the costs and hoping they would “go away.”

She finally decided to see the paramedics after her mother had cancer and they diagnosed a giant ovarian cyst and sent her for surgery to remove it.

It measured 20 inches by 20 inches, the size of an exercise ball or a very large watermelon, and weighed 104 pounds, which was a fifth of her body weight.

Allison Fisher, 20, of Jacksonville, Florida, had a tumor so large it weighed 104 pounds and was the size of an exercise ball. Pictured above is before surgery to remove the tumor

Ms Fisher said the lumpectomy had “saved my life” and made her feel “like a human being” again.

she told a local station News4Jax: “Well, for starters, I can see my feet again, and I haven’t been able to do that in years.”

I feel much lighter. I feel like a person, I can wear clothes, and I can do things that normal people can do.

Ms. Fisher said she is now learning to drive. She is also working on gastric bypass surgery to help with her weight gain.

She weighed 500 lbs before the tumor was removed, and is now down to 400 lbs. She aims to get her weight down from 150lbs to 200lbs.

Doctors say they were also able to save Ms. Fisher’s fertility because, during surgery, they saved her left ovary.

Ms. Fisher initially worried that something wasn’t right when she was 14, but doctors told her to lose weight and made her join Weight Watchers.

She started her period when she was seventeen years old. It lasted for a year and stopped, before later returning abnormally heavy. never had a regular menstrual cycle before,

Ms. Fisher took the photo before her surgery

And show above again after that

Before and after: Ms. Fisher is shown before and after surgery to remove the tumor. Immediately after that, she became 100 pounds lighter, which equated to losing about a fifth of her body weight

Miss Fisher (in red) is learning to drive and says she plans to have weight loss surgery.  Featured above with Dr. Martin Martineau leading the surgery.  Also pictured is Nicole Antinucci (left), physician assistant, and Kendall Pogby (right), registered nurse

Miss Fisher (in red) is learning to drive and says she plans to have weight loss surgery. Featured above with Dr. Martin Martineau leading the surgery. Also pictured is Nicole Antinucci (left), physician assistant, and Kendall Pogby (right), registered nurse

In 2020, she started having stomachaches and had a period that lasted for a whole year.

But she put off seeing the doctors because she did not have health insurance and was afraid that they would only ask her to lose weight.

Her mother, Eileen, was diagnosed with cancer in 2021. After witnessing everything her mother had suffered through, Ms. Fisher said, she decided to visit the doctors again.

At this point, strangers asked her if she was pregnant and her stomach became hard.

She went to Riverside Hospital at Ascension St. Vincent in Jacksonville in November, where x-rays revealed a lump, but it was not cancerous. Doctors recommended surgery for her.

Just before Christmas, she was rushed to the emergency room there after experiencing bleeding from her vagina that was so bad she thought she had a hemorrhage.

Then the doctors took her to the operating room to remove the tumor.

This was done using minimally invasive robotic technology, where doctors make a small incision and then use robotic arms to cut through and remove the tumor piece by piece.

Describing her stomach before undergoing surgery, Ms. Fisher told News4Jax: ‘I allowed myself that if I ignored it, it would go away. I was afraid, I was really afraid.

I felt like I was pregnant with ten kids. I couldn’t lie on my stomach, it felt like all my organs had been smashed.

She added: ‘It was also the height of the pandemic and I was scared to go out. I didn’t want to try to find doctors. I also didn’t have health insurance, so I completely ignored my problems.

“(But) after watching my mother’s fight and what she went through I realized I shouldn’t put off my problems the way I was.”

Ms Fisher said she decided to seek help, after putting it off for years, after watching her mother Eileen (also pictured) struggle while battling cancer

Ms Fisher said she decided to seek help, after putting it off for years, after watching her mother Eileen (also pictured) struggle while battling cancer

Ovarian cysts are usually fluid-filled sacs that can form on or on the surface of an ovary.

Most of the time, these are harmless and most women don’t realize they have them unless they show up on a scan.

But in some cases it can start to grow, causing symptoms that include pelvic pain, feeling bloated, and menstrual pain.

The doctor who performed the operation, Dr Martin Martineau, said: ‘Tumors of this size are extremely rare, so as soon as I met Alison I knew this was going to be a team approach – and our team was ready.

“Robotic-assisted technology is minimally invasive and we only make small incisions, so it often means less pain, less scarring and faster recovery for our patients.”

“This remarkable surgical outcome was made possible by our multidisciplinary team, including intensive care physicians, gynecologic oncology team, hospital physicians, nursing teams and dieticians, who all assisted Alison at this critical moment.”

Ms. Fisher appears above with Dr. Martin Martineau on the local news talking about her cyst.  She is speaking out to encourage others to come forward

Ms. Fisher appears above with Dr. Martin Martineau on the local news talking about her cyst. She is speaking out to encourage others to come forward

The cyst was removed using a robotic machine (pictured is Mrs. Fisher using the machine) which makes small incisions before gradually removing the tumor

The cyst was removed using a robotic machine (pictured is Mrs. Fisher using the machine) which makes small incisions before gradually removing the tumor

Once the tumor was removed, doctors said they located her left ovary, which was still a normal size but had been twisted three times.

They untied her and said that this should preserve her fertility and give her a chance to bear children.

Ms. Fisher shared her story to encourage others to come forward when they have medical problems, rather than putting off a doctor’s visit.

It was not clear how much the surgery would cost.

What is CYST OVARIAN?

An ovarian cyst is a fluid-filled sac that develops on a woman’s ovaries. They are very common and usually do not cause any symptoms.

Most ovarian cysts occur naturally and go away within a few months without the need for any treatment.

symptoms

An ovarian cyst usually only causes symptoms if it has split, is very large, or blocks blood flow to the ovaries.

May cause:

  • Pelvic pain – can range from a dull, heavy sensation to a sudden, sharp, sharp pain
  • Pain during sex
  • Difficulty emptying the bowels Frequent need to urinate
  • Heavy periods, irregular periods or lighter-than-usual periods
  • Flatulence and flatulence
  • Feeling very full after eating a little food
  • Difficulty conceiving – although fertility is not affected in most women with ovarian cysts

Ovarian cysts can sometimes be caused by an underlying condition, such as endometriosis.

The vast majority of ovarian cysts are noncancerous (benign), although a small number are cancerous (malignant). Precancerous cysts are more common in women who have gone through menopause.

Surgical treatment may be needed to remove cysts if they are large, causing symptoms, or potentially cancerous.

In some cases, it may be necessary to have surgery to remove your ovaries, in which case you will not be able to produce any eggs.

source: NHS

(tags to translate) Daily Mail

Merryhttps://whatsnew2day.com/
Merry C. Vega is a highly respected and accomplished news author. She began her career as a journalist, covering local news for a small-town newspaper. She quickly gained a reputation for her thorough reporting and ability to uncover the truth.

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