A & # 039; underlined & # 039; sealion spent four days on earth before being rescued and returned to the ocean

The dishonest sea lion on the front deck of a resident, after the 1,700-pound male gradually moved away from the port of Sitka, in Sitka, Alaska and was stranded

An adventurous wolf has returned to the ocean after spending four days trapped in dehydrated and starved lands.

The sea creature was discovered for the first time around 2 am on August 31 running on a highway in southeastern Alaska, said the head of the Sitka Volunteer Fire Department to the Anchorage Daily News.

A bewildered driver recorded video footage of the marine mammal coming down a dark street and rescue personnel in the area were quickly notified.

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The dishonest sea lion on the front deck of a resident, after the 1,700-pound male gradually moved away from the port of Sitka, in Sitka, Alaska and was stranded

The dishonest sea lion on the front deck of a resident, after the 1,700-pound male gradually moved away from the port of Sitka, in Sitka, Alaska and was stranded

The sea lion Steller (or northerner) is the largest member of the Otariidae family, the "fur seal", which includes all sea lions and fur seals.

The sea lion Steller (or northerner) is the largest member of the Otariidae family, the "fur seal", which includes all sea lions and fur seals.

The sea lion Steller (or northerner) is the largest member of the Otariidae family, the "fur seal", which includes all sea lions and fur seals.

Police, firemen and scientists, above, became involved in the effort to return to the ocean safely after it swung out of the water and was lost.

Police, firemen and scientists, above, became involved in the effort to return to the ocean safely after it swung out of the water and was lost.

Police, firemen and scientists, above, became involved in the effort to return to the ocean safely after it swung out of the water and was lost.

The male 1,700-pound braided stellar sea lion was first seen sitting next to a road in a residential area by a baffled motorist

The male 1,700-pound braided stellar sea lion was first seen sitting next to a road in a residential area by a baffled motorist

The male 1,700-pound braided stellar sea lion was first seen sitting next to a road in a residential area by a baffled motorist

Officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Marine Mammal Strand Network of Alaska, the Sitka Police Department and firefighters attempted to take it to sea on Saturday.

Dave Miller, head of the Sitka Volunteer Fire Department, told the Anchorage Daily News: "It started to take off … it came down, oh, halfway to the water, with us like pushing it with the hose", said Miller. "And suddenly, he decided" I'm done with this, "and he went to the forest."

By Saturday afternoon, the animal was left alone to rest, Miller said. "You do not want to put too much emphasis on that," he said.

On September 2, the scientists tweeted: "NOAA asks the public to clear the area in Sitka where a male star sea lion is in danger, and is hiding in the forest; the incident attracts spectators.

& # 39; Please, for your own safety and the welfare of the animal, if you are in the area, leave & # 39 ;.

Police, firefighters and scientists became involved in the effort to return to the ocean safely after it left the water and was lost.

The volunteer firemen sprayed water on the sea lion, to try to convince him to return to the ocean, but it did not help.

The volunteer firemen sprayed water on the sea lion, to try to convince him to return to the ocean, but it did not help.

The volunteer firemen sprayed water on the sea lion, to try to convince him to return to the ocean, but it did not help.

But this method ended up scaring the sea lion, which then tried to escape

But this method ended up scaring the sea lion, which then tried to escape

But this method ended up scaring the sea lion, which then tried to escape

The fur seal began to go to the forest to escape the great group that tried to help him

The fur seal began to go to the forest to escape the great group that tried to help him

The fur seal began to go to the forest to escape the great group that tried to help him

The sea lion Steller (or northerner) is the largest member of the Otariidae family, the "ear seals", which includes all sea lions and sea lions.

Local police warned the drivers in the area and began the delicate process of trying to convince the sea lion to return to the ocean using a hose.

But his efforts were not successful because the animal had been stressed and dehydrated.

On September 3, four days after the first appearance of the sea lion, the rescuers made the decision to sedate him and transport him back to the port of Sitka.

The dehydrated creature took refuge under the trees, which caused NOAA Fisheries' previous tweet to members of the public to "stay away" from the area

The dehydrated creature took refuge under the trees, which caused NOAA Fisheries' previous tweet to members of the public to "stay away" from the area

The dehydrated creature took refuge under the trees, which caused NOAA Fisheries' previous tweet to members of the public to "stay away" from the area

The gigantic creature was knocked out by a NOAA veterinarian using a dart and rolling over the barrel of an excavator, before being placed in the back of a pick-up truck.

NOAA spokeswoman Julie Speegle said the dozing sea lion was given medication to counteract the sedatives and was carefully monitored in the ocean after its release.

Despite his ordeal, the mammal was eating a fish moments after jumping into the harbor waves from the boat ramp of Southeast Alaska University.

The decision was made to sedate the sea lion mammoth and place it in the front loader

The decision was made to sedate the sea lion mammoth and place it in the front loader

The decision was made to sedate the sea lion mammoth and place it in the front loader

He was taken directly to the ocean, where scientists watched him closely

He was taken directly to the ocean, where scientists watched him closely

He was taken directly to the ocean, where scientists watched him closely

After a four-day effort, the sea lion successfully returned to the ocean at the port of Sitka.

After a four-day effort, the sea lion successfully returned to the ocean at the port of Sitka.

After a four-day effort, the sea lion successfully returned to the ocean at the port of Sitka.

Speegle said: "We tried to persuade the sea lion in the right direction to the water with a fire hose.

"It worked for a while, it was on the right track, but when it came to a road, it veered into the forest.

"He is an adult man and weighs around 1,700 pounds, so there was no manual movement."

& # 39; At this point, I was tired and dehydrated.

"We decided to let him calm down, he was scared and confused, he seemed stressed because he was obviously looking for the ocean."

He spent Sunday night under the cover of the forest, "but he was not leaving," Speegle said.

"On Monday, our veterinarian came down and at 1 pm they managed to sedate him using a dart.

"It was then that they were able to use a front loader and a truck to transport it back to the port.

"We saw him for a few hours to make sure everything was fine, but the first thing he did was eat a fish, so that was a very good sign," Speegle added.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration The fishing experts observed while eating their first fish. The video of its release, above, was filmed by Cindy Bonner Duncan

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration The fishing experts observed while eating their first fish. The video of its release, above, was filmed by Cindy Bonner Duncan

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration The fishing experts observed while eating their first fish. The video of its release, above, was filmed by Cindy Bonner Duncan

Sea lions feed on cod, herring, haddock and salmon, along with octopus and squid.

The Sitka Volunteer Fire Department, which sprayed water on the creature, posted a video of its return to the ocean on Facebook.

Local residents were happy to see that the sea lion had been successfully rescued, and one person commented: "Good luck! Stay away from the killer whales.

The scientists who participated in the rescue said it was not clear why the sea lion had ventured so far from the coast, but NOAA is keeping an eye on the adventurous animal.

Speegle said: "We collected some data for analysis to check your general health and we gave you a satellite tag so we can track your location.

"We are involved in many rescues, but this situation was something out of the ordinary."

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