9 Signs You’ve Already Had COVID, Mayo Clinic Says

a new study Just came out to confirm what too many suffering Americans already knew: A COVID-19 infection, even a mild one, can sometimes lead to debilitating symptoms which can last longer than a year, possibly a lifetime. It is called Long COVID, or Post-COVID syndrome (PCS) or post-acute consequences of SARS-CoV-2 (PASC). And it can happen to up to 30% of those who get COVID. “Honestly, anyone can develop it,” says dr. Billie Schultz, a Mayo Clinic physical medicine and rehabilitation expert. “So they looked at who is more likely to have these symptoms lingering, and… frankly, anyone can. It doesn’t depend on the severity of the COVID infection. It doesn’t necessarily depend on the age of the person. patient. does not necessarily depend on their level of education. It could really be anyone we see. Common signs and symptoms that linger over time include “the following. Read on – and to ensure your health and that of others, don’t miss this one Certain Signs You Have “Long” COVID and May Not Even Know It.

Wife passed out

Wife passed out

“Fatigue and what is called ‘brain fog’ appear to be some of the most common problems for long-distance patients recovering from COVID-19“The Mayo Clinic says. It results in a lack of concentration or memory problems. Long-term COVID “is more like an inflammatory process,” Schultz says. “There are cases where an infection causes this, but for the most part it’s an inflammatory process in the brain. So when I MRI someone’s brain, it looks exactly like this the same because it is more at this microscopic level. And we don’t necessarily know how long the inflammation lasts, but it does change the chemistry and change how the brain processes things.”

woman lying on the bed with a phone in her hand.woman lying on the bed with a phone in her hand.

woman lying on the bed with a phone in her hand.

dr. Anthony Faucic, the chief medical adviser to the president and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has said fatigue is a hallmark symptom of Lung COVID, along with brain fog and muscle aches. It affects most patients, according to a Mayo Clinic study published in Procedures Mayo Clinic– and many of them were warm, active people before that. “Most patients in the study had no pre-existing co-morbidities prior to COVID-19 infection, and many experienced no symptoms related to COVID-19 that were severe enough to be hospitalized,” says Greg Vanichkachorn, MD, medical director of Mayo Clinic’s COVID-19 Activity Rehabilitation Program and lead author of the study. “Most patients had normal or non-diagnostic lab and imaging results despite having debilitating symptoms. That’s one of the challenges in diagnosing PCS in a timely manner and then responding effectively.”

COVID is a respiratory disease and while it can disrupt all of your systems, your lungs are fragile, leading to shortness of breath or difficulty breathing. In addition, COVID can cause heart problems, which can also lead to chest tightness or shortness of breath.

young man sitting on the couch with kidney painyoung man sitting on the couch with kidney pain

young man sitting on the couch with kidney pain

dr. Fauci refers to the aches and pains associated with Lung COVID as “myalgia.” This kind of pain can develop “almost anywhere in your body, including your neck, back, legs, and even your hands,” says the Mayo Clinic. Sometimes it can even feel like other symptoms — one man’s costochondritis, which was pain in his ribs, resembled a heart attack.

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Man with chest pain - heart attack, outdoorsMan with chest pain - heart attack, outdoors

Man with chest pain – heart attack, outdoors

The toll that COVID takes on the heart can cause lasting damage. It “may damage heart muscle and affect heart function,” says cardiologist Wendy Post, MD “There are several reasons for this. The cells in the heart have angiotensin-converting enzyme-2 (ACE-2) receptors where the coronavirus attaches itself before entering the cells. Heart damage may also be due to high levels of inflammation found in the body’s immune system fights the virus, the inflammatory process can damage some healthy tissues, including the heart Coronavirus infection also affects the inner surfaces of veins and arteries, which can lead to inflammation of blood vessels, damage to very small blood vessels and blood clots, all of which can compromise blood flow to the heart or other parts of the body.”

Young woman sitting on a sofa, holding her head, having a strong headache.  Close up Portrait of a young woman with headache.Young woman sitting on a sofa, holding her head, having a strong headache.  Close up Portrait of a young woman with headache.

Young woman sitting on a sofa, holding her head, having a strong headache. Close up Portrait of a young woman with headache.

“What happens when you get this blood vessel inflammation is there’s vasodilation. What causes vasodilation? Headache, migraine? Yes,” says Lung COVID expert dr. Bruce Patterson. “And the vascular information, of course, causes the brain fog and what we call tinnitus or ringing in the ears.”

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Tired woman holding her head with her hands.Tired woman holding her head with her hands.

Tired woman holding her head with her hands.

Imagine taking a walk, doing the dishes, or working all day via Zoom, only to have a complete physical breakdown within two days. This “post-exertional malaise” is one of the most frustrating and difficult to manage symptoms for long haulers. How do you determine which X action led to which Y reaction? Apps like MyMee can help you track that with a specialist, but Long Haulers often find the only solution is to… not move much. It’s bad.

Worried young woman lying sleepless in bed at nightWorried young woman lying sleepless in bed at night

Worried young woman lying sleepless in bed at night

After reading all the above symptoms, you can imagine why Long Haulers have trouble sleeping. Whether it’s inflammation in the brain, pain on waking, fear of the syndrome, or a disruption in your past routine (no exercise???), there are a number of reasons why many lung transporters either have insomnia or have trouble falling asleep. It’s a shame, because rest is what they need.

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Sick woman trying to feel the smell of half fresh orange has symptoms of Covid-19, corona virus infection - loss of smell and tasteSick woman trying to feel the smell of half fresh orange has symptoms of Covid-19, corona virus infection - loss of smell and taste

Sick woman trying to feel the smell of half fresh orange has symptoms of Covid-19, corona virus infection – loss of smell and taste

More than 200 long-term COVID symptoms have been catalogued, including depression or anxiety, a persistent loss of smell or taste, a fast or pounding heartbeat, cough, persistent fever, fainting, heart problems, dizziness on standing, and more. “As we’ve learned from a year of coping with COVID-19, the signs and symptoms of viral and viral infection can vary widely from person to person,” the Mayo Clinic says. Dr Halena Gazelka. “And so are the long-term effects. Some people recover very quickly, while others seem to suffer for quite a long period of time.”

How long? No answers yet. For those who have brain fog, “We don’t know, but we use information from other conditions that affect the brain and cause cognition or brain fog-like symptoms as a kind of surrogate for how we cope and expect improvement,” Schultz says. “And so, as an example, if we use a patient with a concussion as an example, we expect improvement in those patients. And so we say, and that’s a change in brain chemistry with a concussion. And so we’re hopeful that we’ll see improvement will continue to see in these patients.”

Care worker on home visitCare worker on home visit

Care worker on home visit

“Probably the first and most important thing is to make sure you seek help from medical providers and given that COVID-19 and especially Long Hauler syndrome — these syndromes can affect multiple organ systems,” says Schultz. “People can be fatigued. People can have breathing problems, but also brain problems. It’s important to seek care in a multidisciplinary medical center where you can see specialties in all these areas.”

“As the pandemic continues, we expect to see more patients experiencing symptoms long after infection, and healthcare providers need to prepare for this, know what to look for and know how best to meet the needs of their patients,” said Dr. . Vanichkachorn.

So ask your doctor about multidisciplinary care and do not visit any of these to protect your life and that of others 35 places you are most likely to get COVID.