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66 paramedic from Colorado, who went to NYC to volunteer and died of the coronavirus, given the hero’s procession

The retired Colorado paramedic, who died of coronavirus after volunteering to be deployed to New York during the pandemic, had an honorary procession when his body was returned to his home state for burial.

Paul Cary, 66, from Aurora, Colorado, was part of the New York State COVID Response team in Ambulnz when he volunteered to be deployed to the state’s coronavirus epicenter, New York City.

Cary, a 32-year-old paramedic of the Aurora Fire Rescue firefighter, began working in the city on April 1.

He was commissioned to work with FEMA and was stationed at the Bronx Zoo and transporting patients throughout NYC, an Ambulanz spokesperson said 9 News.

Veteran firefighter paramedic Paul Cary, 66, volunteered to be sent from Colorado to New York City to help front liner workers battle New York City's coronavirus

Veteran firefighter paramedic Paul Cary, 66, volunteered to be sent from Colorado to New York City to help front liner workers battle New York City’s coronavirus

Cary started working in NYC on April 1 and developed symptoms of coronavirus on April 19 or 20. He died on April 30 in NYC. His coffin is displayed here and arrives in Denver, Colorado on May 3.

Cary started working in NYC on April 1 and developed symptoms of coronavirus on April 19 or 20. He died on April 30 in NYC. His coffin is displayed here and arrives in Denver, Colorado on May 3.

Cary started working in NYC on April 1 and developed symptoms of coronavirus on April 19 or 20. He died on April 30 in NYC. His coffin is displayed here and arrives in Denver, Colorado on May 3.

Firefighters salute Cary's chest as it is unloaded from the plane that flew it to Denver

Firefighters salute Cary's chest as it is unloaded from the plane that flew it to Denver

Firefighters salute Cary’s chest as it is unloaded from the plane that flew it to Denver

Ambulnz paramedics and Aurora firefighters carry Cary's casket to a waiting ambulance. Cary was a 32-year-old paramedic veteran with Aurora Fire Rescue

Ambulnz paramedics and Aurora firefighters carry Cary's casket to a waiting ambulance. Cary was a 32-year-old paramedic veteran with Aurora Fire Rescue

Ambulnz paramedics and Aurora firefighters carry Cary’s casket to a waiting ambulance. Cary was a 32-year-old paramedic veteran with Aurora Fire Rescue

Aurora firefighter Tom Johnson is spotted as Cary's body arrives at Denver Airport on Sunday evening

Aurora firefighter Tom Johnson is spotted as Cary's body arrives at Denver Airport on Sunday evening

Aurora firefighter Tom Johnson is spotted as Cary’s body arrives at Denver Airport on Sunday evening

Then, on April 19 or 20, he developed symptoms of coronavirus and was admitted to The Bronx’s Montefiore Hospital the following day.

He died on April 30 of complications from the coronavirus, Ambulnz officials said The Denver Channel.

However, Cary didn’t die alone because one of his two children – his son, Chris – had managed to fly from Colorado to NYC to be hospitalized by his side.

In NYC on Sunday, a caravan of ambulances accompanied his body as it traveled from a Staten Island funeral home to Newark Airport for the trip back to Colorado, according to ABC 7.

The flight of Cary’s body landed at Denver International Airport in Colorado on Sunday at around 7:00 PM.

His flag-wrapped chest was greeted by firefighters as it was released from flight.

Firefighters and other first responders stood up while watching Cary's procession on Sunday evening

Firefighters and other first responders stood up while watching Cary's procession on Sunday evening

Firefighters and other first responders stood up while watching Cary’s procession on Sunday evening

More than 80 rescue vehicles and four helicopters participated in Cary's hero procession

More than 80 rescue vehicles and four helicopters participated in Cary's hero procession

More than 80 rescue vehicles and four helicopters participated in Cary’s hero procession

The emergency vehicle procession can be seen here departing from Denver International Airport

The emergency vehicle procession is seen here from Denver International Airport

The emergency vehicle procession is seen here from Denver International Airport

Workers stopped to watch the massive funeral procession as it passed through Denver

Workers stopped to watch the massive funeral procession as it passed through Denver

Workers stopped to watch the massive funeral procession as it passed through Denver

Local residents waved American flags and held thank you signs as the procession passed

Local residents waved American flags and held thank you signs as the procession passed

Local residents waved American flags and held thank you signs as the procession passed

Cary's coffin also had a large procession when he was taken from the Staten Island funeral home in NYC to the airport for his flight back to Colorado on Sunday afternoon

Cary's coffin also had a large procession when he was taken from the Staten Island funeral home in NYC to the airport for his flight back to Colorado on Sunday afternoon

Cary’s coffin also had a large procession when he was taken from the Staten Island funeral home in NYC to the airport for his flight back to Colorado on Sunday afternoon

More than 80 rescue vehicles and four helicopters were part of the procession that accompanied Cary’s hearse to Denver’s Olinger Hampden Mortuary & Cemetery, where a small ceremony took place for him.

Neighbors were seen wearing masks and waving American flags and thank-you plates as the procession passed.

“We were devastated to learn that our father and grandfather, Paul Cary, became the last victim to die of COVID-19. Our family regrets his loss and knows that all his friends and family will miss him greatly, “Cary’s family said in a statement to the Denver Channel after his death.

“He risked his own health and safety to protect others and left this world a better place. We have peace in knowing that Paul did to the end that he loved and believed in. ‘

After signing up for deployment at the end of March, he actually signed up for a second 30-day tour before getting sick with the coronavirus.

“That’s not something you can train for, it’s in your blood, in your culture and that’s what Paul is all about,” Ambulnz CEO Stan Vashovsky told ABC 7.

Cary is survived by his two children and four grandchildren.

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